This HTML5 document contains 199 embedded RDF statements represented using HTML+Microdata notation.

The embedded RDF content will be recognized by any processor of HTML5 Microdata.

PrefixNamespace IRI
dbpedia-dehttp://de.dbpedia.org/resource/
n29http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:FilePath/Torah_and_jad.jpg?width=
dcthttp://purl.org/dc/terms/
yago-reshttp://yago-knowledge.org/resource/
dbohttp://dbpedia.org/ontology/
foafhttp://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/
dbpedia-wikidatahttp://wikidata.dbpedia.org/resource/
dbpedia-eshttp://es.dbpedia.org/resource/
n21http://dbpedia.org/resource/Simcha_(disambiguation)
yagohttp://dbpedia.org/class/yago/
dbthttp://dbpedia.org/resource/Template:
rdfshttp://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#
n17http://dbpedia.org/resource/Template:Script/
n31http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/4689/jewish/shemini-atzeret-simchat-torah.
n9http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Simchat_Torah&action=
dbpedia-pthttp://pt.dbpedia.org/resource/
dbpedia-cshttp://cs.dbpedia.org/resource/
n30http://rdf.freebase.com/ns/m.
rdfhttp://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#
n26http://wikidata.org/entity/
owlhttp://www.w3.org/2002/07/owl#
dbpedia-ithttp://it.dbpedia.org/resource/
n24http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:FilePath/Torah_and_jad.
n12http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Simchat_Torah&oldid=
n22http://fr.dbpedia.org/resource/Sim'
wikipedia-enhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
dbphttp://dbpedia.org/property/
dbchttp://dbpedia.org/resource/Category:
xsdhhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#
dbpedia-idhttp://id.dbpedia.org/resource/
dbpedia-nlhttp://nl.dbpedia.org/resource/
dbrhttp://dbpedia.org/resource/
Subject Item
n21:
dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Simchat_Torah
rdf:type
yago:ReligiousHoliday115183802 yago:Abstraction100002137 yago:Measure100033615 yago:Leisure115137676 yago:Day115157225 yago:CalendarDay115157041 yago:TimeOff115118453 yago:FundamentalQuantity113575869 yago:Holiday115183428 yago:TimePeriod115113229 yago:JewishHolyDays yago:Vacation115137890
dbo:thumbnail
n29:300
owl:sameAs
dbpedia-id:Simchat_Torah yago-res:Simchat_Torah dbpedia-de:Simchat_Tora dbpedia-nl:Simchat_Thora dbpedia-cs:Simchat_Tóra dbpedia-pt:Simchat_Torá n22:hat_Torah dbpedia-es:Simjat_Torá n26:Q431678 dbpedia-wikidata:Q431678 dbpedia-it:Simchat_Torah n30:01x14x
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
wikipedia-en:Simchat_Torah
rdfs:comment
Simchat Torah or Simhat Torah (Hebrew: שִׂמְחַת תּוֹרָה, lit., "Rejoicing with/of the Torah", Ashkenazi: Simchas Torah) is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei (occurring in mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar). Simchat Torah or Simhat Torah (Hebrew: שִׂמְחַת תּוֹרָה‎, lit., "Rejoicing with/of the Torah", Ashkenazi: Simchas Torah) is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei (occurring in mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar).
rdfs:label
Simchat Torah
dbo:abstract
Simchat Torah or Simhat Torah (Hebrew: שִׂמְחַת תּוֹרָה‎, lit., "Rejoicing with/of the Torah", Ashkenazi: Simchas Torah) is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei (occurring in mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar). The main celebrations of Simchat Torah take place in the synagogue during evening and morning services. In Orthodox as well as many Conservative congregations, this is the only time of year on which the Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark and read at night. In the morning, the last parashah of Deuteronomy and the first parashah of Genesis are read in the synagogue. On each occasion, when the ark is opened, the worshippers leave their seats to dance and sing with the Torah scrolls in a joyous celebration that can last for several hours. The morning service is also uniquely characterized by the calling up of each member of the congregation for an aliyah. There is also a special aliyah for all the children (Boys under the age of 13). Simchat Torah or Simhat Torah (Hebrew: שִׂמְחַת תּוֹרָה‎, lit., "Rejoicing with/of the Torah", Ashkenazi: Simchas Torah) is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei (occurring in mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar). The main celebrations of Simchat Torah take place in the synagogue during evening and morning services. In Orthodox as well as many Conservative congregations, this is the only time of year on which the Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark and read at night. In the morning, the last parashah of Deuteronomy and the first parashah of Genesis are read in the synagogue. On each occasion, when the ark is opened, the worshippers leave their seats to dance and sing with the Torah scrolls in a joyous celebration that can last for several hours. The morning service is also uniquely characterized by the calling up of each member of the congregation for an aliyah. There is also a special aliyah for all the children (Boys under the age of 13 ). Simchat Torah or Simhat Torah (Hebrew: שִׂמְחַת תּוֹרָה‎, lit., "Rejoicing with/of the Torah", Ashkenazi: Simchas Torah) is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei (occurring in mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar). The main celebrations of Simchat Torah take place in the synagogue during evening and morning services. In Orthodox as well as many Conservative congregations, this is the only time of year on which the Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark and read at night. In the morning, the last parashah of Deuteronomy and the first parashah of Genesis are read in the synagogue. On each occasion, when the ark is opened, the worshippers leave their seats to dance and sing with the Torah scrolls in a joyous celebration that can last for several hours. The morning service is also uniquely characterized by the calling up of each member of the congregation for an aliyah. There is also a special aliyah for all the children. Simchat Torah or Simhat Torah (Hebrew: שִׂמְחַת תּוֹרָה, lit., "Rejoicing with/of the Torah", Ashkenazi: Simchas Torah) is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei (occurring in mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar). The main celebrations of Simchat Torah take place in the synagogue during evening and morning services. In Orthodox as well as many Conservative congregations, this is the only time of year on which the Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark and read at night. In the morning, the last parashah of Deuteronomy and the first parashah of Genesis are read in the synagogue. On each occasion, when the ark is opened, the worshippers leave their seats to dance and sing with the Torah scrolls in a joyous celebration that can last for several hours. The morning service is also uniquely characterized by the calling up of each member of the congregation for an aliyah. There is also a special aliyah for all the children (under 13 for boys and 12 for girls). Simchat Torah or Simhat Torah (Hebrew: שִׂמְחַת תּוֹרָה‎, lit., "Rejoicing with/of the Torah", Ashkenazi: Simchas Torah) is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei (occurring in mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar). The main celebrations of Simchat Torah take place in the synagogue during evening and morning services. In Orthodox as well as many Conservative congregations, this is the only time of year on which the Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark and read at night. In the morning, the last parashah of Deuteronomy and the first parashah of Genesis are read in the synagogue. On each occasion, when the ark is opened, the worshippers leave their seats to dance and sing with the Torah scrolls in a joyous celebration that can last for several hours. The morning service is also uniquely characterized by the calling up of each member of the congregation for an aliyah. There is also a special aliyah for all the children (under 13 for boys and 12 for girls).
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
n9:edit
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
n31:htm
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
2020-10-26T09:03:48Z 2020-10-07T23:52:21Z 2020-02-13T03:46:09Z 2020-10-02T16:24:31Z 2020-10-02T16:23:23Z 2020-10-07T23:51:54Z 2020-12-06T18:49:06Z 2020-10-08T02:34:11Z 2021-04-07T06:29:03Z 2021-04-07T08:47:29Z 2020-07-21T21:45:17Z 2020-10-08T11:59:02Z 2020-07-21T20:38:35Z 2020-10-09T16:33:10Z 2020-10-09T18:33:41Z 2020-07-23T06:29:21Z 2020-06-15T20:36:53Z 2020-10-26T03:06:28Z 2021-01-20T15:47:13Z 2020-06-15T20:30:02Z 2021-01-07T00:42:43Z 2020-12-03T02:49:58Z 2020-10-02T16:24:22Z 2020-10-02T16:21:31Z
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
n9:history
dbo:wikiPageID
332243
dbo:wikiPageLength
17232 17032 17388 17496 17094 17097 17098 17099 17101 17092 17103 17108 17370 17372 17083 17084 17365 17072
dbo:wikiPageModified
2020-02-13T03:46:05Z 2020-10-02T16:24:18Z 2020-10-07T23:51:50Z 2020-10-26T09:03:44Z 2020-07-21T21:45:14Z 2020-07-23T06:29:15Z 2020-10-09T18:33:37Z 2021-01-07T00:42:37Z 2020-10-02T16:21:27Z 2020-07-21T20:38:30Z 2021-04-07T08:47:23Z 2020-10-08T11:58:58Z 2020-06-15T20:29:57Z 2020-06-15T20:36:49Z 2020-12-06T18:49:01Z 2020-10-07T23:52:17Z 2020-10-09T16:33:05Z 2021-04-07T06:28:58Z 2020-10-02T16:24:24Z 2020-12-03T02:49:52Z 2020-10-26T03:06:22Z 2020-10-08T02:34:05Z 2020-10-02T16:23:18Z
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
99 100 101 102
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
968839546 992029233 998781011 982479175 981486726 985466109 985499995 982411184 982673853 982411151 981487237 981487076 962747027 981487261 982690378 1016446376 969070255 982428730 940540588 1016459533 992714302 962747980 968847387
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
n12:982673853 n12:992714302 n12:962747027 n12:982411184 n12:981487076 n12:962747980 n12:982411151 n12:969070255 n12:981487261 n12:992029233 n12:940540588 n12:982690378 n12:968839546 n12:968847387 n12:985466109 n12:998781011 n12:1016459533 n12:982479175 n12:981486726 n12:985499995 n12:982428730 n12:981487237 n12:1016446376
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbt:More_footnotes dbt:Lang-he-n dbt:CURRENTYEAR dbt:Dubious dbt:Commons_category n17:Hebrew dbt:Reflist dbt:NEXTYEAR dbt:Hebrew dbt:LASTYEAR dbt:Moveable_date dbt:Sukkot dbt:Jewish_and_Israeli_holidays dbt:ISBN
dct:subject
dbc:Sukkot dbc:Hebrew_names_of_Jewish_holy_days dbc:Torah dbc:Shemini_Atzeret dbc:Hebrew_words_and_phrases_in_Jewish_law dbc:Tishrei_observances dbc:Hallel
foaf:depiction
n24:jpg
Subject Item
wikipedia-en:Simchat_Torah
foaf:primaryTopic
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Simḥat_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Sukkot
dbo:similar
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Simhath_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Simhat_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Simchas_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Simhath_Torath
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Simchath_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Simkhat_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:שמחת_תורה
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Rejoicing_of_the_law
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Simchat_torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Chatan_Bereshit
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Bridegroom_of_Genesis
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Bridegroom_of_the_Law
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Bridegroom_of_the_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Bridegrooms_of_the_law
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Chatan_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Hakkafot
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Hatan_Bereshit
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Hatan_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Bridegroom_Of_Genesis
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah
Subject Item
dbr:Bridegroom_Of_The_Torah
dbo:wikiPageRedirects
dbr:Simchat_Torah