The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty of Lak a branch of Lurs origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia.

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  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty of Lak a branch of Lurs origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty of Lak founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty of Lak a branch of Lurs originfounded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was a Lak dynasty founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty of Lak a branch of Lurs or Kurds origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was a Lak dynasty, a branch of Lurs or Kurds, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was a Iranian dynasty, a branch of Lurs or Kurds, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, a branch of Lurs or Kurds, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, a branch of Kurds, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, According to many sources a branch of Kurds. According to some sources branch of Lurs origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, according to many sources a branch of Kurds, according to some sources a branch of Lurs origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, a branch of Lurs, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, a branch of Lurs , origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid and Sasanian era's. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Sa'adi were also renovated by Karim Khan. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo and were renamed en masse, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the names of the two main streets of Shiraz, the Karim Khan street and Lotf-Ali Khan street. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid and Sasanian era's. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Sa'adi were also renovated by Karim Khan. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo and were renamed en masse, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the names of the two main streets of Shiraz, the Karim Khan Zand street and Lotf Ali Khan street. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid and Sasanian era's. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Sa'adi were also renovated by Karim Khan. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo and were renamed en masse, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the two main streets of Shiraz, the Karim Khan Zand street and Lotf Ali Khan street. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Sa'adi were also renovated by Karim Khan. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo and were renamed en masse, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the two main streets of Shiraz, the Karim Khan Zand street and Lotf Ali Khan street. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo and were renamed en masse, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the two main streets of Shiraz, the Karim Khan Zand street and Lotf Ali Khan street. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo and were renamed en masse, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the two main streets of Shiraz, the Karim Khan Zand street and Lotf Ali Khan Zand street. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the Karim Khan Zand and Lotf Ali Khan Zand streets, the two main streets of Shiraz. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the Karim Khan Zand and Lotf Ali Khan Zand streets, the two main streets of Shiraz. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the nearby sites of the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the Karim Khan Zand and Lotf Ali Khan Zand streets, the two main streets of Shiraz. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the nearby sites of the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. Distinctive Zand art which was produced at the behest of the Zand rulers became the foundation of later Qajar arts arts and crafts. Following the death of Karim Khan, Zand Iran went into decline due to internal disputes amongst members of the Zand dynasty. Its final ruler, Lotf Ali Khan Zand, was eventually tortured and executed by Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar (r. 1789–1797) in 1794. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the Karim Khan Zand and Lotf Ali Khan Zand streets, the two main streets of Shiraz. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand (r. 1751–1779) that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the nearby sites of the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. Distinctive Zand art which was produced at the behest of the Zand rulers became the foundation of later Qajar arts arts and crafts. Following the death of Karim Khan, Zand Iran went into decline due to internal disputes amongst members of the Zand dynasty. Its final ruler, Lotf Ali Khan Zand (r. 1789–1794), was eventually tortured and executed by Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar (r. 1789–1797) in 1794. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the Karim Khan Zand and Lotf Ali Khan Zand streets, the two main streets of Shiraz. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand (r. 1751–1779) that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the nearby sites of the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. Distinctive Zand art which was produced at the behest of the Zand rulers became the foundation of later Qajar arts arts and crafts. Following the death of Karim Khan, Zand Iran went into decline due to internal disputes amongst members of the Zand dynasty. Its final ruler, Lotf Ali Khan Zand (r. 1789–1794), was eventually executed by Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar (r. 1789–1797) in 1794. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the Karim Khan Zand and Lotf Ali Khan Zand streets, the two main streets of Shiraz. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand (r. 1751–1779) that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the nearby sites of the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. Distinctive Zand art which was produced at the behest of the Zand rulers became the foundation of later Qajar arts and crafts. Following the death of Karim Khan, Zand Iran went into decline due to internal disputes amongst members of the Zand dynasty. Its final ruler, Lotf Ali Khan Zand (r. 1789–1794), was eventually executed by Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar (r. 1789–1797) in 1794. As noted by the The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, "Karim Khan Zand holds an enduring reputation as the most humane Iranian ruler of the Islamic era". When following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 the names of the past rulers of Iran became a taboo, the citizens of Shiraz refused to rename the Karim Khan Zand and Lotf Ali Khan Zand streets, the two main streets of Shiraz. (en)
  • JonathanZand (en)
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  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty of Lak a branch of Lurs origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty of Lak founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty of Lak a branch of Lurs originfounded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was a Lak dynasty founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty of Lak a branch of Lurs or Kurds origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was a Lak dynasty, a branch of Lurs or Kurds, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was a Iranian dynasty, a branch of Lurs or Kurds, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, a branch of Lurs or Kurds, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, a branch of Kurds, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, According to many sources a branch of Kurds. According to some sources branch of Lurs origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, according to many sources a branch of Kurds, according to some sources a branch of Lurs origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, a branch of Lurs, origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, a branch of Lurs , origin founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Iraq and Armenia. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid and Sasanian era's. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Sa'adi were also renovated by Karim Khan. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Sa'adi were also renovated by Karim Khan. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being derived from the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the nearby sites of the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the nearby sites of the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. Distinctive Zand art which was produced at the b (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand (r. 1751–1779) that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. The reign of its most important ruler, Karim Khan, was marked by prosperity and peace. With its capital at Shiraz, arts and architecture flourished under Karim Khan's reign, with some themes in architecture being revived from the nearby sites of the Achaemenid (550–330 BC) and Sasanian (224–651 AD) era's of pre-Islamic Iran. The tombs of the medieval Persian poets Hafez and Saadi Shirazi were also renovated by Karim Khan. Distinctive Zand art which was pr (en)
  • The Zand dynasty (Persian: سلسله زندیه‎, Selseleye Zandiye; ) was an Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand (r. 1751–1779) that initially ruled southern and central Iran in the 18th century. It later quickly came to expand to include much of the rest of contemporary Iran, as well as Azerbaijan, Bahrain, and parts of Armenia and Iraq. (en)
  • JonathanZand (en)
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