Western dress codes are dress codes in Western culture about what clothes are worn for what occasion. Classifications are traditionally divided into formal wear (full dress), semi-formal wear (half dress), and informal wear (undress). The first two sometimes in turn divided into day and evening wear. Anything below this level is referred to as casual wear, although sometimes in combinations such as "smart casual" or "business casual" in order to indicate higher expectation than none at all.

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  • Western dress codes are dress codes in Western culture about what clothes are worn for what occasion. Classifications are traditionally divided into formal wear (full dress), semi-formal wear (half dress), and informal wear (undress). The first two sometimes in turn divided into day and evening wear. Anything below this level is referred to as casual wear, although sometimes in combinations such as "smart casual" or "business casual" in order to indicate higher expectation than none at all. Formal i.e. white tie, semi-formal i.e. black tie, and informal i.e. suit, all have roots in 19th century customs subsequent to the replacement of the 18th century generic justaucorps, and has remained essentially fixed defined since the 20th century, despite decline following the counterculture of the 1960s. The 19th century frock coat rarely occurs except as formal alternative. For women, interpretations has fluctuated more dynamically according to fashion. For both men and women, hats corresponding the various levels of formality declined following the counterculture of the 1960s. Dress codes are typically explicitly instructed, but may also be expected by peer pressure of sensitivity. Ceremonial dress, military uniform, religious clothing, academic dress, and folk costume appropriate to the formality level are generally permitted alongside the respective dresscodes and may be permitted as supplementary alternative exceptions to the uniformity, often in the form of headgear (see biretta, kippah etc.). Conversely, since most cultures have at least intuitively applied some level equivalent to the more formal ones in Western dress code traditions, the latter's versatile framework open to amalgamation of international and local customs, have influenced its competitiveness as international standard formality scale. (en)
  • Western dress codes are dress codes in Western culture about what clothes are worn for what occasion. Classifications are traditionally divided into formal wear (full dress), semi-formal wear (half dress), and informal wear (undress). The first two sometimes in turn divided into day and evening wear. Anything below this level is referred to as casual wear, although sometimes in combinations such as "smart casual" or "business casual" in order to indicate higher expectation than none at all. Formal i.e. white tie, semi-formal i.e. black tie, and informal i.e. suit, all have roots in 19th century customs subsequent to the replacement of the 18th century generic justaucorps, and has remained essentially fixed defined since the 20th century, despite decline following the counterculture of the 1960s. The 19th century frock coat rarely occurs except as formal alternative. For women, interpretations have fluctuated more dynamically according to fashion. For both men and women, hats corresponding to the various levels of formality declined following the counterculture of the 1960s. Dress codes are typically explicitly instructed, but may also be expected by peer pressure of sensitivity. Ceremonial dress, military uniform, religious clothing, academic dress, and folk costume appropriate to the formality level are generally permitted alongside the respective dresscodes and may be permitted as supplementary alternative exceptions to the uniformity, often in the form of headgear (see biretta, kippah etc.). Conversely, since most cultures have at least intuitively applied some level equivalent to the more formal ones in Western dress code traditions, the latter's versatile framework open to amalgamation of international and local customs, have influenced its competitiveness as international standard formality scale. (en)
  • Western dress codes are dress codes in Western culture about what clothes are worn for what occasion. Classifications are traditionally divided into formal wear (full dress), semi-formal wear (half dress), and informal wear (undress). The first two are sometimes in turn divided into day and evening wear. Anything below this level is referred to as casual wear, although sometimes in combinations such as "smart casual" or "business casual" in order to indicate higher expectation than none at all. Formal i.e. white tie, semi-formal i.e. black tie, and informal i.e. suit, all have roots in 19th century customs subsequent to the replacement of the 18th century generic justaucorps, and has remained essentially fixed defined since the 20th century, despite decline following the counterculture of the 1960s. The 19th century frock coat rarely occurs except as formal alternative. For women, interpretations have fluctuated more dynamically according to fashion. For both men and women, hats corresponding to the various levels of formality declined following the counterculture of the 1960s. Dress codes are typically explicitly instructed, but may also be expected by peer pressure of sensitivity. Ceremonial dress, military uniform, religious clothing, academic dress, and folk costume appropriate to the formality level are generally permitted alongside the respective dresscodes and may be permitted as supplementary alternative exceptions to the uniformity, often in the form of headgear (see biretta, kippah etc.). Conversely, since most cultures have at least intuitively applied some level equivalent to the more formal ones in Western dress code traditions, the latter's versatile framework open to amalgamation of international and local customs, have influenced its competitiveness as international standard formality scale. (en)
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  • Western dress codes are dress codes in Western culture about what clothes are worn for what occasion. Classifications are traditionally divided into formal wear (full dress), semi-formal wear (half dress), and informal wear (undress). The first two sometimes in turn divided into day and evening wear. Anything below this level is referred to as casual wear, although sometimes in combinations such as "smart casual" or "business casual" in order to indicate higher expectation than none at all. (en)
  • Western dress codes are dress codes in Western culture about what clothes are worn for what occasion. Classifications are traditionally divided into formal wear (full dress), semi-formal wear (half dress), and informal wear (undress). The first two are sometimes in turn divided into day and evening wear. Anything below this level is referred to as casual wear, although sometimes in combinations such as "smart casual" or "business casual" in order to indicate higher expectation than none at all. (en)
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  • Western dress codes (en)
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