The United States presidential election of 1916 was the 33rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1916. Incumbent Democratic President Woodrow Wilson defeated Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican candidate. Wilson was only sitting Democratic president to win re-election between 1832 and 1936.Wilson was re-nominated without opposition at the 1916 Democratic National Convention.

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  • The United States presidential election of 1916 was the 33rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1916. Incumbent President Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic candidate, was pitted against Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican candidate. After a hard-fought contest, Wilson defeated Hughes by nearly 600,000 votes in the popular vote and secured a narrow majority in the Electoral College by winning several swing states with razor-thin margins. Wilson's re-election marked the first time that a Democratic Party candidate had won two consecutive Presidential elections since Andrew Jackson won re-election in the 1832 election.The election took place while Mexico was going through the Mexican Revolution and Europe was embroiled in World War I. Public sentiment in the still neutral United States leaned towards the British and French (Allied) forces, due to the harsh treatment of civilians by the German Army in large parts of Belgium and northern France. However, despite their sympathy with the Allied forces, most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war, and preferred to continue a policy of neutrality. Wilson's campaign used the popular slogan "He kept us out of war" to appeal to those voters who wanted to avoid a war in Europe or with Mexico. The progressive Hughes criticized Wilson for not taking the "necessary preparations" to face a conflict, which served to strengthen Wilson's image as an anti-war candidate. The Republicans had supported a moderate interventionist policy under the previous three administrations, while no Democratic president had presided over a major war since James K. Polk with the Mexican-American War.Despite the narrow margin of his win, the 1916 election saw an increase in Wilson's popular vote from his election in 1912, when he won in a landslide in the Electoral College. Wilson accomplished this due to the split in the Republican vote in 1912 between the incumbent William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt, the former Republican president who ran as a Progressive. In 1916, conservative and progressive Republicans were largely united under the moderate Hughes in their bid to oust Wilson. However, Wilson attracted many voters who had earlier supported Roosevelt. It is one of only three elections in which a nominee was elected president without the support of his state of residence (New Jersey). The other two were James K. Polk (Tennessee, 1844) and Richard Nixon (New York, 1968). Wilson, however, did win his state of birth (Virginia), like Nixon (born in California), but unlike Polk (born in North Carolina). (en)
  • The United States presidential election of 1916 was the 33rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1916. Incumbent President Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic candidate, was pitted against Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican candidate. After a hard-fought contest, Wilson defeated Hughes by nearly 600,000 votes in the popular vote and secured a narrow majority in the Electoral College by winning several swing states with razor-thin margins. Wilson's re-election marked the first time that a Democratic Party candidate had won two consecutive Presidential elections since Andrew Jackson won re-election in the 1832 election. This was the last election before ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which granted women the right to vote.The election took place while Mexico was going through the Mexican Revolution and Europe was embroiled in World War I. Public sentiment in the still neutral United States leaned towards the British and French (Allied) forces, due to the harsh treatment of civilians by the German Army in large parts of Belgium and northern France. However, despite their sympathy with the Allied forces, most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war, and preferred to continue a policy of neutrality. Wilson's campaign used the popular slogan "He kept us out of war" to appeal to those voters who wanted to avoid a war in Europe or with Mexico. The progressive Hughes criticized Wilson for not taking the "necessary preparations" to face a conflict, which served to strengthen Wilson's image as an anti-war candidate. The Republicans had supported a moderate interventionist policy under the previous three administrations, while no Democratic president had presided over a major war since James K. Polk with the Mexican-American War.Despite the narrow margin of his win, the 1916 election saw an increase in Wilson's popular vote from his election in 1912, when he won in a landslide in the Electoral College. Wilson accomplished this due to the split in the Republican vote in 1912 between the incumbent William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt, the former Republican president who ran as a Progressive. In 1916, conservative and progressive Republicans were largely united under the moderate Hughes in their bid to oust Wilson. However, Wilson attracted many voters who had earlier supported Roosevelt. It is one of only two elections in which a nominee was elected president without the support of his state of residence (New Jersey). The other was James K. Polk (Tennessee, 1844). Wilson, however, did win his state of birth (Virginia) unlike Polk (born in North Carolina). (en)
  • The United States presidential election of 1916 was the 33rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1916. Incumbent President Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic candidate, was pitted against Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican candidate. After a hard-fought contest, Wilson defeated Hughes by nearly 600,000 votes in the popular vote and secured a narrow majority in the Electoral College by winning several swing states with razor-thin margins. Wilson's re-election marked the first time that a Democratic Party candidate had won two consecutive Presidential elections since Andrew Jackson won re-election in the 1832 election. This was the last election before the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which granted women the right to vote.The election took place during the time of the Mexican Revolution and Europe's involvement in World War I. Although officially neutral in the European conflict, public opinion in the United States leaned towards the Allied forces headed by Great Britain and France against the German Empire and Austria-Hungary, due in large measure to the harsh treatment of civilians by the German Army in Belgium and northern France and the militaristic character of the German and Austrian monarchies. But in spite of their sympathy with the Allied forces, most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war and preferred to continue a policy of neutrality. Wilson's campaign used the popular slogan "He kept us out of war" to appeal to those voters who wanted to avoid a war in Europe or with Mexico. The progressive Hughes criticized Wilson for not taking the "necessary preparations" to face a conflict, which only served to strengthen Wilson's image as an anti-war candidate.Despite the narrow margin of his win, the 1916 election saw an increase in Wilson's popular vote from his election in 1912, when he won a landslide in the Electoral College. Wilson accomplished this as a result of a split in the Republican vote in 1912 between the incumbent President William Howard Taft, a conservative, and former President Theodore Roosevelt, who ran as a Progressive. In 1916, conservative and progressive Republicans were largely united under the moderate Hughes in their bid to oust Wilson. Nonetheless, Wilson attracted many voters who had earlier supported Roosevelt.The election of 1916 is one of only four elections in which a candidate was elected president without the support of his state of residence (in this case, New Jersey). The other three were the election of 1844, in which James K. Polk failed to carry Tennessee; the election of 1968, in which Richard Nixon failed to carry New York; and the election of 2016, in which Donald Trump did not win New York. Wilson, however, did win his state of birth (Virginia), as with Nixon (California), unlike Polk, who was born in North Carolina and Trump, who was born in New York. (en)
  • The United States presidential election of 1916 was the 33rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1916. Incumbent President Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic candidate, was pitted against Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican candidate. After a hard-fought contest, Wilson defeated Hughes by nearly 600,000 votes in the popular vote and secured a narrow majority in the Electoral College by winning several swing states with razor-thin margins. Wilson's re-election marked the first time that a Democratic Party candidate had won two consecutive Presidential elections since Andrew Jackson won re-election in the 1832 election. This was the last election before the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which granted women the right to vote.The election took place during the time of the Mexican Revolution and Europe's involvement in World War I. Although officially neutral in the European conflict, public opinion in the United States leaned towards the Allied forces headed by Great Britain and France against the German Empire and Austria-Hungary, due in large measure to the harsh treatment of civilians by the German Army in Belgium and northern France and the militaristic character of the German and Austrian monarchies. But in spite of their sympathy with the Allied forces, most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war and preferred to continue a policy of neutrality. Wilson's campaign used the popular slogan "He kept us out of war" to appeal to those voters who wanted to avoid a war in Europe or with Mexico. The progressive Hughes criticized Wilson for not taking the "necessary preparations" to face a conflict, which only served to strengthen Wilson's image as an anti-war candidate.Despite the narrow margin of his win, the 1916 election saw an increase in Wilson's popular vote from his election in 1912, when he won a landslide in the Electoral College. Wilson accomplished this as a result of a split in the Republican vote in 1912 between the incumbent President William Howard Taft, a conservative, and former President Theodore Roosevelt, who ran as a Progressive. In 1916, conservative and progressive Republicans were largely united under the moderate Hughes in their bid to oust Wilson. Nonetheless, Wilson attracted many voters who had earlier supported Roosevelt.The election of 1916 is one of only four elections in which a candidate was elected president without the support of his state of residence (in this case, New Jersey). The other three were the election of 1844, in which James K. Polk failed to carry Tennessee; the election of 1968, in which Richard Nixon failed to carry New York; and the election of 2016, in which Donald Trump did not win New York. Wilson, however, did win his state of birth (Virginia), as with Nixon (California). (en)
  • The United States presidential election of 1916 was the 33rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1916. Incumbent Democratic President Woodrow Wilson defeated Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican candidate. Wilson was only sitting Democratic president to win re-election between 1832 and 1936.Wilson was re-nominated without opposition at the 1916 Democratic National Convention. The 1916 Republican National Convention chose Hughes as a compromise between the conservative and progressive wings of the party. Hughes defeated John W. Weeks, Elihu Root, and several other candidates on the third ballot of the convention, becoming the only Supreme Court Justice to serve as a major party's presidential nominee. While conservative and progressive Republicans had been divided in the 1912 election between the candidacies of then-incumbent President William Howard Taft and former President Theodore Roosevelt, they largely united around Hughes in his bid to oust Wilson.The election took place during the time of the Mexican Revolution and Europe's involvement in World War I. Although officially neutral in the European conflict, public opinion in the United States leaned towards the Allied forces headed by Great Britain and France against the German Empire and Austria-Hungary, due in large measure to the harsh treatment of civilians by the German Army in Belgium and northern France and the militaristic character of the German and Austrian monarchies, but in spite of their sympathy with the Allied forces most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war and preferred to continue a policy of neutrality. Wilson's campaign used the popular slogans "He kept us out of war" and "America First" to appeal to those voters who wanted to avoid a war in Europe or with Mexico. Hughes criticized Wilson for not taking the "necessary preparations" to face a conflict, which only served to strengthen Wilson's image as an anti-war candidate. Ironically, the United States would enter the war in April 1917, one month after Wilson's inauguration as president.After a hard-fought contest, Wilson defeated Hughes by nearly 600,000 votes in the popular vote. He secured a narrow majority in the Electoral College by sweeping the Solid South and winning several swing states with razor-thin margins. The 1916 election saw an increase in Wilson's popular vote from the four-way election of 1912, but a major decline in the number of electoral votes won. Allan L. Benson of the Socialist Party and Frank Hanly of the Prohibition Party each finished with greater than 1% of the popular vote. (en)
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  • The United States presidential election of 1916 was the 33rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1916. Incumbent Democratic President Woodrow Wilson defeated Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican candidate. Wilson was only sitting Democratic president to win re-election between 1832 and 1936.Wilson was re-nominated without opposition at the 1916 Democratic National Convention. (en)
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