The turning radius or turning circle of a vehicle is the radius (or, depending on usage, diameter) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making.

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  • The turning radius or turning circle of a vehicle is the radius (or, depending on usage, diameter) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making. (en)
  • The turning radius (US) or turning circle (UK) of a vehicle is the radius (or, depending on usage, diameter) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making. The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal radius in which for example an aeroplane, a vehicle or a boat can be turned around. Theoretically speaking tightest turning radius possible for a vehicle is the one where the vehicle does not move either forwards or backwards while turning and effectively simply rotates on its own axis. Taking a rectangular vehicle capable of doing this, its turning circle would in fact be equal to the diagonal length of the vehicle. Most obviously boats can be turned in this way. On wheeled vehicles with common front wheel steering (i.e. one, two or even four wheels at the front capable of steering), the vehicle's turning radius is a measure of the space needed to turn the vehicle around while the steering is set to its maximum displacement from the central 'straight ahead' position - i.e. either extreme left or right. If a theoretical marker pen was placed on the point of the vehicle furthest from the center of the turn, it would draw a circle and the radius of that circle would give the value of that vehicle's turning radius. For example the 2017 Audi A4 has a turning radius of 5.8 m (19 ft), which corresponds to a turning diameter (sometimes called turning circle) of 11.6 m (38.1 ft). (en)
  • The turning circle of a vehicle can refer to either the radius or the diameter (turning radius or turning diameter, respectively) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making. The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal radius in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. Theoretically speaking tightest turning radius possible for a vehicle is the one where the vehicle does not move either forwards or backwards while turning and effectively simply rotates on its own axis. Taking a rectangular vehicle capable of doing this, its turning circle would in fact be equal to the diagonal length of the vehicle. Most obviously boats can be turned in this way. On wheeled vehicles with common front wheel steering (i.e. one, two or even four wheels at the front capable of steering), the vehicle's turning radius is a measure of the space needed to turn the vehicle around while the steering is set to its maximum displacement from the central 'straight ahead' position - i.e. either extreme left or right. If a theoretical marker pen was placed on the point of the vehicle furthest from the center of the turn, it would draw a circle and the radius of that circle would give the value of that vehicle's turning radius. For example the 2017 Audi A4 has a turning radius of 5.8 m (19 ft), which corresponds to a turning diameter (sometimes called turning circle) of 11.6 m (38.1 ft). (en)
  • The turning circle of a vehicle can refer to either the radius or the diameter (turning radius or turning diameter, respectively) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making. The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal radius in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. Theoretically speaking tightest turning circle possible for a vehicle is the one where the vehicle does not move either forwards or backwards while turning and effectively simply rotates on its own axis. Taking a rectangular vehicle capable of doing this, its turning circle would in fact be equal to the diagonal length of the vehicle. As an example, some boats can be turned in this way. On wheeled vehicles with the common type of front wheel steering (i.e. one, two or even four wheels at the front capable of steering), the vehicle's turning radius is a measure of the space needed to turn the vehicle around while the steering is set to its maximum displacement from the central 'straight ahead' position - i.e. either extreme left or right. If a theoretical marker pen was placed on the point of the vehicle furthest from the center of the turn, it would draw a circle and the radius of that circle would give the value of that vehicle's turning radius. For example the 2017 Audi A4 has a turning radius of 5.8 m (19 ft), which corresponds to a turning diameter (sometimes called turning circle) of 11.6 m (38.1 ft). (en)
  • The turning circle of a vehicle can refer to either the radius or the diameter (turning radius or turning diameter, respectively) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making. The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal radius in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. Theoretically speaking tightest turning circle possible for a vehicle is the one where the vehicle does not move either forwards or backwards while turning and effectively simply rotates on its own axis. Taking a rectangular vehicle capable of doing this, its turning circle would in fact be equal to the diagonal length of the vehicle. As an example, some boats can be turned in this way. On wheeled vehicles with the common type of front wheel steering (i.e. one, two or even four wheels at the front capable of steering), the vehicle's turning radius is a measure of the space needed to turn the vehicle around while the steering is set to its maximum displacement from the central 'straight ahead' position - i.e. either extreme left or right. If a theoretical marker pen was placed on the point of the vehicle furthest from the center of the turn, it would draw a circle and the radius of that circle would give the value of that vehicle's turning radius. For example the 2017 Audi A4 has a turning radius of 5.8 m (19 ft), which mathematically corresponds to a twice as big turning diameter (sometimes called turning circle) of 11.6 m (38.1 ft). (en)
  • The turning diameter of a vehicle refers to the minimum diameter (or "width") of available space required for that vehicle to make a circular turn (i.e. U-turn). The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal circle in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. On wheeled vehicles with the common type of front wheel steering (i.e. one, two or even four wheels at the front capable of steering), the vehicle's turning diameter is a measure of the space needed to turn the vehicle around while the steering is set to its maximum displacement from the central 'straight ahead' position - i.e. either extreme left or right. If a theoretical marker pen was placed on the point of the vehicle furthest from the center of the turn, it would draw a circle and the diameter of that circle would give the value of that vehicle's turning diameter. Theoretically speaking, the tightest turning circle possible for a vehicle is the one where the vehicle does not move either forwards or backwards while turning and effectively simply rotates on its own axis. Taking a rectangular vehicle capable of doing this, its turning circle would in fact be equal to the diagonal length of the vehicle. As an example, some boats can be turned in this way. Turning diameter is sometimes used i everyday speak as a generalized term rather than with numerical figures. For example, a vehicle with a very small turning circle may be described as having a "tight turning radius" (aka. being more difficult to turn). (en)
  • The turning diameter of a vehicle refers to the minimum diameter (or "width") of available space required for that vehicle to make a circular turn (i.e. U-turn). The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal circle in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. On wheeled vehicles with the common type of front wheel steering (i.e. one, two or even four wheels at the front capable of steering), the vehicle's turning diameter is a measure of the space needed to turn the vehicle around while the steering is set to its maximum displacement from the central 'straight ahead' position - i.e. either extreme left or right. If a theoretical marker pen was placed on the point of the vehicle furthest from the center of the turn, it would draw a circle and the diameter of that circle would give the value of that vehicle's turning diameter. Theoretically speaking, the tightest turning circle possible for a vehicle is the one where the vehicle does not move either forwards or backwards while turning and effectively simply rotates on its own axis. Taking a rectangular vehicle capable of doing this, its turning circle would in fact be equal to the diagonal length of the vehicle. As an example, some boats can be turned in this way. Turning diameter is sometimes used i everyday speak as a generalized term rather than with numerical figures. For example, a vehicle with a very small turning circle may be described as having a "tight turning radius" (aka. being more difficult to turn). The terms turning radius and turning circle are sometimes used, but can have different meanings (see the section on Alternative nomenclature below). (en)
  • The turning diameter of a vehicle refers to the minimum diameter (or "width") of available space required for that vehicle to make a circular turn (i.e. U-turn). The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal circle in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. On wheeled vehicles with the common type of front wheel steering (i.e. one, two or even four wheels at the front capable of steering), the vehicle's turning diameter is a measure of the space needed to turn the vehicle around while the steering is set to its maximum displacement from the central 'straight ahead' position - i.e. either extreme left or right. If a theoretical marker pen was placed on the point of the vehicle furthest from the center of the turn, it would draw a circle and the diameter of that circle would give the value of that vehicle's turning diameter. Theoretically speaking, the tightest turning circle possible for a vehicle is the one where the vehicle does not move either forwards or backwards while turning and effectively simply rotates on its own axis. Taking a rectangular vehicle capable of doing this, its turning circle would in fact be equal to the diagonal length of the vehicle. As an example, some boats can be turned in this way. Turning diameter is sometimes used in everyday speak as a generalized term rather than with numerical figures. For example, a vehicle with a very small turning circle may be described as having a "tight turning radius" (aka. being more difficult to turn). The terms turning radius and turning circle are sometimes used, but can have different meanings (see the section on Alternative nomenclature below). The OED describes turning circle as "the smallest circle within which a ship, motor vehicle, etc., can be turned round completely". (en)
  • The turning diameter of a vehicle refers to the minimum diameter (or "width") of available space required for that vehicle to make a circular turn (i.e. U-turn). The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal circle in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. On wheeled vehicles with the common type of front wheel steering (i.e. one, two or even four wheels at the front capable of steering), the vehicle's turning diameter is a measure of the space needed to turn the vehicle around while the steering is set to its maximum displacement from the central 'straight ahead' position - i.e. either extreme left or right. If a theoretical marker pen was placed on the point of the vehicle furthest from the center of the turn, it would draw a circle and the diameter of that circle would give the value of that vehicle's turning diameter. Theoretically speaking, the tightest turning circle possible for a vehicle is the one where the vehicle does not move either forwards or backwards while turning and effectively simply rotates on its own axis. Taking a rectangular vehicle capable of doing this, its turning circle would in fact be equal to the diagonal length of the vehicle. As an example, some boats can be turned in this way. Turning diameter is sometimes used in everyday speak as a generalized term rather than with numerical figures. For example, a vehicle with a very small turning circle may be described as having a "tight turning radius" (aka. being more difficult to turn). The terms turning radius and turning circle are sometimes used, but can have different meanings (see the section on Alternative nomenclature below). The Oxford English Dictionary describes turning circle as "the smallest circle within which a ship, motor vehicle, etc., can be turned round completely". (en)
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  • The turning radius or turning circle of a vehicle is the radius (or, depending on usage, diameter) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making. (en)
  • The turning radius (US) or turning circle (UK) of a vehicle is the radius (or, depending on usage, diameter) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making. The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal radius in which for example an aeroplane, a vehicle or a boat can be turned around. For example the 2017 Audi A4 has a turning radius of 5.8 m (19 ft), which corresponds to a turning diameter (sometimes called turning circle) of 11.6 m (38.1 ft). (en)
  • The turning circle of a vehicle can refer to either the radius or the diameter (turning radius or turning diameter, respectively) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making. The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal radius in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. For example the 2017 Audi A4 has a turning radius of 5.8 m (19 ft), which corresponds to a turning diameter (sometimes called turning circle) of 11.6 m (38.1 ft). (en)
  • The turning circle of a vehicle can refer to either the radius or the diameter (turning radius or turning diameter, respectively) of the smallest circular turn (i.e. U-turn) that the vehicle is capable of making. The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal radius in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. For example the 2017 Audi A4 has a turning radius of 5.8 m (19 ft), which mathematically corresponds to a twice as big turning diameter (sometimes called turning circle) of 11.6 m (38.1 ft). (en)
  • The turning diameter of a vehicle refers to the minimum diameter (or "width") of available space required for that vehicle to make a circular turn (i.e. U-turn). The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal circle in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. Turning diameter is sometimes used i everyday speak as a generalized term rather than with numerical figures. For example, a vehicle with a very small turning circle may be described as having a "tight turning radius" (aka. being more difficult to turn). (en)
  • The turning diameter of a vehicle refers to the minimum diameter (or "width") of available space required for that vehicle to make a circular turn (i.e. U-turn). The term thus refers to a theoretical minimal circle in which for example an aeroplane, a ground vehicle or a watercraft can be turned around. Turning diameter is sometimes used in everyday speak as a generalized term rather than with numerical figures. For example, a vehicle with a very small turning circle may be described as having a "tight turning radius" (aka. being more difficult to turn). (en)
rdfs:label
  • Turning radius (en)
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