The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics comprise 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics comprise 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. == p*nisThe word "tropic" comes from Ancient Greek τροπή (tropē), meaning "to turn" or "change direction", as the Sun appears to cease its southerly course when it reaches this latitude and begins moving back to the north. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics comprise 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. == p*nisThe word "tropic" comes from Ancient Greek τροπή (tropē), meaning "to turn" or "change direction", as the Sun appears to cease its southerly course when it reaches this latitude and begins moving back to the north. P*NIS(Main articles: Tropical climate and Wet season) "Tropical" is sometimes used in a general sense for a tropical climate to mean warm to hot and moist year-round, often with the sense of lush vegetation. Many tropical areas have a dry and wet season. The wet season, rainy season or green season is the time of year, ranging from one or more months, when most of the average annual rainfall in a region falls. Areas with wet seasons are disseminated across portions of the tropics and subtropics. Under the Köppen climate classification, for tropical climates, a wet-season month is defined as a month where average precipitation is 60 millimetres (2.4 in) or more. Tropical rainforests technically do not have dry or wet seasons, since their rainfall is equally distributed through the year. Some areas with pronounced rainy seasons see a break in rainfall during mid-season when the intertropical convergence zone or monsoon trough moves poleward of their location during the middle of the warm season; typical vegetation in these areas ranges from moist seasonal tropical forests to savannahs. When the wet season occurs during the warm season, or summer, precipitation falls mainly during the late afternoon and early evening hours. The wet season is a time when air quality improves, freshwater quality improves and vegetation grows significantly, leading to crop yields late in the season. Floods cause rivers to overflow their banks, and some animals to retreat to higher ground. Soil nutrients diminish and erosion increases. The incidence of malaria increases in areas where the rainy season coincides with high temperatures. Animals have adaptation and survival strategies for the wetter regime. The previous dry season leads to food shortages into the wet season, as the crops have yet to mature. However, regions within the tropics may well not have a tropical climate. Under the Köppen climate classification, much of the area within the geographical tropics is classed not as "tropical" but as "dry" (arid or semi-arid), including the Sahara Desert, the Atacama Desert and Australian Outback. Also, there are alpine tundra and snow-capped peaks, including Mauna Kea, Mount Kilimanjaro, and the Andes as far south as the northernmost parts of Chile and Perú. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics is the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics is the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.43662°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.43662°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.43661°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.43661°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.4366°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.4366°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43659°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43659°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43659°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43659°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, not least the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43658°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43658°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, not least the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43657°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43657°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, not least the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43657°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43657°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, not least the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43656°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43656°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, not least the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43656°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43656°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, not least the variance is very small. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43655°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43655°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, not least the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • Equatorial Region("Tropic" and "Tropical" redirect here. For other uses, see Tropic (disambiguation) and Tropical (disambiguation).) The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43655°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43655°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, not least the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43654°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43654°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, and the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43654°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43654°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, and the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43653°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43653°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, and the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43652°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43652°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, the approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, and the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43652°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43652°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfectly fixed due chiefly to the influence of the moon, but the limits of tropics are a geographic convention, being an averaged form, and the variance is very small. In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter. The word "tropical" sometimes refers to this sort of climate rather than to the geographical zone. The tropical zone includes deserts and snow-capped mountains, which are not tropical in the climatic sense. The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The tropics constitute 40% of Earth's surface area and contain 36% of Earth's landmass. As of 2014, the region was home to 40% of the world's population, and this figure was then projected to reach 50% by 2050. (en)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-04-22 07:02:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:22:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:22:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:23:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:24:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:24:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:25:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:26:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:26:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:27:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:27:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:27:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:28:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:28:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:28:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-13 09:48:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-13 09:49:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 09:13:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:27:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:41:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:43:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:44:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:45:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:53:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:54:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:16:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:16:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:17:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:18:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:25:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:34:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:35:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:42:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:43:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:43:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:51:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:51:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:52:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-05 07:19:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-07 10:21:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-10 04:17:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-18 17:07:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-21 13:11:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-21 13:13:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-28 02:12:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-28 02:13:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-28 02:14:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-29 01:07:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-29 01:30:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-02 08:10:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-02 08:14:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-11 05:39:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-21 08:21:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-21 20:14:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-30 19:04:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 10:55:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:33:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:33:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:35:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:35:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:38:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:39:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 11:18:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-03 15:40:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-03 16:33:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-05 22:04:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-09 15:59:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-26 18:08:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 19:54:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 19:54:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 19:55:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:02:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:03:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:03:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:04:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:04:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:04:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-23 00:40:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-27 10:05:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-29 11:25:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-06 08:58:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-13 09:16:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-16 05:51:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 22:23:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 22:24:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-09 05:39:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-30 13:54:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-04-15 20:58:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-04-15 20:59:12Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 66577 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 1589 (xsd:integer)
  • 11339 (xsd:integer)
  • 11340 (xsd:integer)
  • 11343 (xsd:integer)
  • 11344 (xsd:integer)
  • 11354 (xsd:integer)
  • 11355 (xsd:integer)
  • 11471 (xsd:integer)
  • 11475 (xsd:integer)
  • 11479 (xsd:integer)
  • 11489 (xsd:integer)
  • 11493 (xsd:integer)
  • 11496 (xsd:integer)
  • 11499 (xsd:integer)
  • 11506 (xsd:integer)
  • 11508 (xsd:integer)
  • 11509 (xsd:integer)
  • 11511 (xsd:integer)
  • 11514 (xsd:integer)
  • 11515 (xsd:integer)
  • 11526 (xsd:integer)
  • 11527 (xsd:integer)
  • 11530 (xsd:integer)
  • 11532 (xsd:integer)
  • 11534 (xsd:integer)
  • 11546 (xsd:integer)
  • 11547 (xsd:integer)
  • 11549 (xsd:integer)
  • 11553 (xsd:integer)
  • 11561 (xsd:integer)
  • 11571 (xsd:integer)
  • 11575 (xsd:integer)
  • 11597 (xsd:integer)
  • 11605 (xsd:integer)
  • 11612 (xsd:integer)
  • 11615 (xsd:integer)
  • 11629 (xsd:integer)
  • 11633 (xsd:integer)
  • 11637 (xsd:integer)
  • 11639 (xsd:integer)
  • 11645 (xsd:integer)
  • 11650 (xsd:integer)
  • 11651 (xsd:integer)
  • 11656 (xsd:integer)
  • 11658 (xsd:integer)
  • 11659 (xsd:integer)
  • 11664 (xsd:integer)
  • 11672 (xsd:integer)
  • 11676 (xsd:integer)
  • 11689 (xsd:integer)
  • 44855 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-04-22 07:02:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:22:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:23:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:24:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:24:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:25:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:26:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:26:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:27:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:27:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:27:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:28:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:28:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-03 20:28:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-13 09:48:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-13 09:49:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 09:13:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:27:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:41:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:43:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:44:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:45:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:53:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 22:54:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:16:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:16:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:17:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:18:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:25:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:34:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:35:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:42:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:43:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:43:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:51:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:51:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 23:52:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-05 07:19:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-10 04:17:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-21 13:11:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-21 13:13:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-28 02:12:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-28 02:13:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-29 01:07:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-29 01:30:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-02 08:09:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-02 08:14:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-11 05:39:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-21 08:21:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-21 20:14:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 10:55:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:33:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:33:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:35:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:35:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:38:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-09 07:39:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 11:18:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-03 15:40:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-03 16:33:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-05 22:04:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-26 18:07:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:03:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:03:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-23 00:40:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-27 10:05:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-29 11:25:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-06 08:58:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-13 09:16:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-16 05:51:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 22:23:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-09 05:39:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-04-15 20:58:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-04-15 20:59:08Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 18 (xsd:integer)
  • 91 (xsd:integer)
  • 92 (xsd:integer)
  • 93 (xsd:integer)
  • 94 (xsd:integer)
  • 342 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 952438910 (xsd:integer)
  • 954696918 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697013 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697110 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697176 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697333 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697389 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697439 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697546 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697598 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697612 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697656 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697673 (xsd:integer)
  • 954697704 (xsd:integer)
  • 956433961 (xsd:integer)
  • 956434004 (xsd:integer)
  • 960321296 (xsd:integer)
  • 960427548 (xsd:integer)
  • 960429290 (xsd:integer)
  • 960429521 (xsd:integer)
  • 960429602 (xsd:integer)
  • 960429692 (xsd:integer)
  • 960430704 (xsd:integer)
  • 960430864 (xsd:integer)
  • 960433413 (xsd:integer)
  • 960433450 (xsd:integer)
  • 960433548 (xsd:integer)
  • 960433647 (xsd:integer)
  • 960434461 (xsd:integer)
  • 960435526 (xsd:integer)
  • 960435579 (xsd:integer)
  • 960436371 (xsd:integer)
  • 960436497 (xsd:integer)
  • 960436564 (xsd:integer)
  • 960437581 (xsd:integer)
  • 960437655 (xsd:integer)
  • 960437741 (xsd:integer)
  • 960849912 (xsd:integer)
  • 972098267 (xsd:integer)
  • 974171115 (xsd:integer)
  • 974171321 (xsd:integer)
  • 975357018 (xsd:integer)
  • 975357206 (xsd:integer)
  • 975526003 (xsd:integer)
  • 975528028 (xsd:integer)
  • 976308485 (xsd:integer)
  • 976309790 (xsd:integer)
  • 977820831 (xsd:integer)
  • 979531064 (xsd:integer)
  • 979625050 (xsd:integer)
  • 982790987 (xsd:integer)
  • 987790785 (xsd:integer)
  • 987790797 (xsd:integer)
  • 987790969 (xsd:integer)
  • 987790998 (xsd:integer)
  • 987791226 (xsd:integer)
  • 987791290 (xsd:integer)
  • 990767303 (xsd:integer)
  • 992111766 (xsd:integer)
  • 992120362 (xsd:integer)
  • 992555719 (xsd:integer)
  • 996450510 (xsd:integer)
  • 999753177 (xsd:integer)
  • 999753197 (xsd:integer)
  • 1002130911 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003086207 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003520601 (xsd:integer)
  • 1005168530 (xsd:integer)
  • 1006521035 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007048983 (xsd:integer)
  • 1010322307 (xsd:integer)
  • 1011130742 (xsd:integer)
  • 1018015527 (xsd:integer)
  • 1018015602 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43665°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. (en)
  • The tropics is the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.9″ (or 23.43664°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. (en)
  • The tropics is the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.43662°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.43662°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.43661°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.43661°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of the Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.8″ (or 23.4366°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.4366°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.4366°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43659°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43659°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all the areas on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point) - thus the latitude of the tropics is roughly equal to the angle of the Earth's axial tilt. (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43659°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43659°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfe (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43658°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43658°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfe (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43657°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.7″ (or 23.43657°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfe (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43657°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43657°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfe (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43656°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43656°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfe (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43655°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43655°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perf (en)
  • Equatorial Region("Tropic" and "Tropical" redirect here. For other uses, see Tropic (disambiguation) and Tropical (disambiguation).) The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43655°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43655°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43654°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.6″ (or 23.43654°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perf (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43654°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43654°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perf (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43653°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43653°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perf (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43652°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43652°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, the approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perfe (en)
  • The tropics are the region of Earth surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43652°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn inthe Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′11.5″ (or 23.43652°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone). The tropics include all zones on Earth where the Sun contacts a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point). Thus the maximum latitudes of the tropics have the same value positive and negative. Likewise, they approximate, due to the earth not being a perfect sphere, the "angle" of the Earth's axial tilt. The "angle" itself is not perf (en)
rdfs:label
  • Tropics (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of