Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "western values". In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "western values". In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "western values". In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "western values". In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "western values". In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Especially in the United States, it also includes the right to keep and bear arms. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "western values". In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Especially in the United States, it also includes the right to keep and bear arms. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, gender identity, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "western values". In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Especially in the United States, it also includes the right to keep and bear arms. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "Western values". In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Especially in the United States, it also includes the right to keep and bear arms. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values, and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "Western values". In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Especially in the United States, it also includes the right to keep and bear arms. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideogloeies, and organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing secular government. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism. Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing secular government. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in the United States rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism in the United States relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, and gun ownership, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a far-right Neo-Nazi KKK White male supremacist homophobic ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a politically right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a right-wing political ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a right-wing political ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the mid 1850s from the |abolition movement, as well as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, the protection of religious freedoms, and the organisation around government involvement in social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a right-wing political ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the mid 1850s from the abolition movement, as well as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, the protection of religious freedoms, and the organisation around government involvement in social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political philosophy and variant of conservatism which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political philosophy and variety of conservatism which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions.[1] This can include moral issues.[2] Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism.[3] Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues.[4][5] It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "western values".[6] In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order.[7][5] Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism.[8][9] (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. Social conservatism encompasses a range of what may be thought of as bourgeois positions on social issues. It developed as a reaction to what was perceived as dangerous tendencies within the liberal movements toward political radicalism and a wholesale rejection of "western values".[6] In North America, since the mid to late 20th century, social conservatism arose as a response to federal action on social issues—such as freedom of religion, the reduction in criminal penalties, freedom of conscience and abortion—which members perceived as a threat to conservative values and societal order. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting accommodationism, and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political philosophy and variety of conservatism which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the early 1800s as a reaction to the percieved anti-Christian and anti-constitutional aspects of slavery, as articulated by William Wilberforce and Abraham Lincoln. They also engaged with the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other challenges to social institutions. Social conservatives often promoted the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political philosophy and variety of conservatism which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the early 1800s as a reaction to the perceived anti-Christian and anti-constitutional aspects of slavery, as articulated by William Wilberforce and Abraham Lincoln. They also engaged with the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other challenges to social institutions. Social conservatives often promoted the organisation and politicisation of social issues. Sociologist Harry F. Dahms suggests that social conservatism relates to a "commitment" to traditional values concerned with family structures, sexual relations, patriotism, gun ownership and military invasions, describing Christian doctrinal conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage) and gun-use conservatives (pro-NRA) as the two domains of ideology within. Social conservatives also value the rights of religious institutions to participate in the public sphere, thus supporting government-religious endorsement and opposing state atheism. (en)
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  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, and patriotism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, and patriotism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, gender identity, and patriotism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values, and established institutions. This can include moral issues. Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideogloeies, and organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism. Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in the United States rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a far-right Neo-Nazi KKK White male supremacist homophobic ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a politically right-wing ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a right-wing political ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a right-wing political ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the mid 1850s from the |abolition movement, as well as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, the protection of religious freedoms, and the organisation around government involvement in social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a right-wing political ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the mid 1850s from the abolition movement, as well as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, the protection of religious freedoms, and the organisation around government involvement in social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political ideology which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political philosophy and variant of conservatism which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political philosophy and variety of conservatism which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the late 1900s as a reaction to the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other anti-immigration ideologies, and the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is the belief that society is built upon a fragile network of relationships which need to be upheld through duty, traditional values and established institutions.[1] This can include moral issues.[2] Social conservatism is generally skeptical of social change, and believes in maintaining the status quo concerning social issues such as family life, sexual relations, and patriotism.[3] (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political philosophy and variety of conservatism which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the early 1800s as a reaction to the percieved anti-Christian and anti-constitutional aspects of slavery, as articulated by William Wilberforce and Abraham Lincoln. They also engaged with the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other challenges to social institutions. Social conservatives often promoted the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
  • Social conservatism is a political philosophy and variety of conservatism which places emphasis on traditional power structures over social pluralism, and seeks to "reverse or stem the direction of change". Social conservatism in North America rose in the early 1800s as a reaction to the perceived anti-Christian and anti-constitutional aspects of slavery, as articulated by William Wilberforce and Abraham Lincoln. They also engaged with the economic insecurity of lower-class Protestant Americans, McCarthyism and other challenges to social institutions. Social conservatives often promoted the organisation and politicisation of social issues. (en)
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  • Social conservatism (en)
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