Sepia, a photojournalistic magazine styled like Look and sometimes compared to Ebony, featured articles based primarily on achievements of African Americans. It was part of the rise of postwar publications and businesses aimed at black audiences. The magazine was founded in 1946 as Negro Achievements by Horace J. Blackwell, an African-American clothing merchant of Fort Worth, Texas. He had already founded The World's Messenger in 1942, featuring romance-true confession type stories of working-class blacks. Blackwell died in 1949.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Sepia, a photojournalistic magazine styled like Look and sometimes compared to Ebony, featured articles based primarily on achievements of African Americans. It was part of the rise of postwar publications and businesses aimed at black audiences. The magazine was founded in 1946 as Negro Achievements by Horace J. Blackwell, an African-American clothing merchant of Fort Worth, Texas. He had already founded The World's Messenger in 1942, featuring romance-true confession type stories of working-class blacks. Blackwell died in 1949. George Levitan, a Jewish-American man born in Michigan, who was a plumbing merchant in Fort Worth, bought the magazines and Good Publishing Company (aka Sepia Publishing) in 1950. He changed the magazine's name gradually; in 1954 he named it Sepia, and published it until his death in 1976. He changed the name of Messenger to Bronze Thrills and had success with that for some time as well, also publishing black-audience magazines Heb and Jive. After his death, Sepia was bought by Beatrice Pringle, who had been part of Blackwell's founding editorial team. She continued it until 1983, closing it despite respectable circulation. It was always overshadowed by Ebony, founded and published in Chicago. (en)
dbo:circulation
  • 160000 (xsd:integer)
dbo:city
dbo:country
dbo:depictionDescription
  • October 1960 cover of Sepia featuringBessie A. Buchanan (en)
dbo:editorTitle
  • Editorial director (en)
dbo:genre
dbo:issn
  • 0037-2374
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-01-27 15:26:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-28 12:41:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-09 12:13:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-19 12:20:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-11 23:01:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-23 02:15:09Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 2401103 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 11926 (xsd:integer)
  • 11928 (xsd:integer)
  • 11933 (xsd:integer)
  • 11948 (xsd:integer)
  • 11967 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-01-27 15:25:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-28 12:40:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-09 12:13:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-19 12:20:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-11 23:01:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-23 02:15:04Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 38 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 937842831 (xsd:integer)
  • 959368729 (xsd:integer)
  • 966826618 (xsd:integer)
  • 968442232 (xsd:integer)
  • 972412551 (xsd:integer)
  • 979835911 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbo:year
  • 1983-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Sepia, a photojournalistic magazine styled like Look and sometimes compared to Ebony, featured articles based primarily on achievements of African Americans. It was part of the rise of postwar publications and businesses aimed at black audiences. The magazine was founded in 1946 as Negro Achievements by Horace J. Blackwell, an African-American clothing merchant of Fort Worth, Texas. He had already founded The World's Messenger in 1942, featuring romance-true confession type stories of working-class blacks. Blackwell died in 1949. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Sepia (magazine) (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of