Rust v. Sullivan, 500 U.S. 173 (1991), was a case in the United States Supreme Court that upheld Department of Health and Human Services regulations prohibiting employees in federally funded family-planning facilities from counseling a patient on abortion. This ruling was made after the Department issued a regulation in 1988 expanding its interpretation of the Title X provision that no family planning funds "shall be used in programs where abortion is a method of family planning."

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  • Rust v. Sullivan, 500 U.S. 173 (1991), was a case in the United States Supreme Court that upheld Department of Health and Human Services regulations prohibiting employees in federally funded family-planning facilities from counseling a patient on abortion. This ruling was made after the Department issued a regulation in 1988 expanding its interpretation of the Title X provision that no family planning funds "shall be used in programs where abortion is a method of family planning." Many physicians and clinics challenged the regulation, arguing that it violated their First Amendment right to free speech and the right of women to seek an abortion under Roe v. Wade. The case reached the Supreme Court, where a 5–4 verdict allowed the regulation to go into effect, holding that the regulation was a reasonable interpretation of the Public Health Service Act, and that the First Amendment is not violated when the government merely chooses to "fund one activity to the exclusion of another." There were several arguments for why the supreme court case could have violated the First Amendment. The argument used in defense of the government not violating the first amendment and not staying neutral was coined "government speech" The argument that when the government decided to not fund planned parenthoods which engaged in abortions, it was participating in "government speech" which means they were speaking on its own behalf and simply holding the views of those who elected them, not regulating private speech. (en)
  • Rust v. Sullivan, 500 U.S. 173 (1991), was a case in the United States Supreme Court that upheld Department of Health and Human Services regulations prohibiting employees in federally funded family-planning facilities from counseling a patient on abortion. This ruling was made after the Department issued a regulation in 1988 expanding its interpretation of the Title X provision that no family planning funds "shall be used in programs where abortion is a method of family planning." Many physicians and clinics challenged the regulation, arguing that it violated their First Amendment right to free speech and the right of women to seek an abortion under Roe v. Wade. The case reached the Supreme Court, where a 5–4 verdict allowed the regulation to go into effect, holding that the regulation was a reasonable interpretation of the Public Health Service Act, and that the First Amendment is not violated when the government merely chooses to "fund one activity to the exclusion of another." There were several arguments for why the supreme court case could have violated the First Amendment. The argument used in defense of the government not violating the First Amendment and not staying neutral was coined "government speech" The argument was that when the government decided to not fund Planned Parenthood facilities which engaged in abortions, it was participating in "government speech" which means they were speaking on its own behalf and simply holding the views of those who elected them, not regulating private speech. (en)
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  • Rust v. Sullivan, 500 U.S. 173 (1991), was a case in the United States Supreme Court that upheld Department of Health and Human Services regulations prohibiting employees in federally funded family-planning facilities from counseling a patient on abortion. This ruling was made after the Department issued a regulation in 1988 expanding its interpretation of the Title X provision that no family planning funds "shall be used in programs where abortion is a method of family planning." (en)
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  • Rust v. Sullivan (en)
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  • (en)
  • Irving Rust, et al., Petitioners v. Louis W. Sullivan, Secretary of Health and Human Services; New York, et al., Petitioners v. Louis W. Sullivan, Secretary of Health and Human Services (en)
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