The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (221 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million).

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  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. Today, around 800 million people are native speakers worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. Additionally, the major Romance languages have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially the case for French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (221 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Because of the difficulty of imposing boundaries on a continuum, various counts of the modern Romance languages are given; for example, Dalby lists 23 based on mutual intelligibility. The following, more extensive list, includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. Today, around 800 million people are native speakers worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. Additionally, the major Romance languages have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially the case for French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Because of the difficulty of imposing boundaries on a continuum, various counts of the modern Romance languages are given; for example, Dalby lists 23 based on mutual intelligibility. The following, more extensive list, includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. Today, around 800 million people are native speakers worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. Additionally, the major Romance languages have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially the case for French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Because of the difficulty of imposing boundaries on a continuum, various counts of the modern Romance languages are given; for example, Dalby lists 23 based on mutual intelligibility. The following, more extensive list, includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • Egg }} The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. Today, around 800 million people are native speakers worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. Additionally, the major Romance languages have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially the case for French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Because of the difficulty of imposing boundaries on a continuum, various counts of the modern Romance languages are given; for example, Dalby lists 23 based on mutual intelligibility. The following, more extensive list, includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. Today, around 800 million people are native speakers of Romance languages worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. Additionally, the major Romance languages have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially the case for French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Because of the difficulty of imposing boundaries on a continuum, various counts of the modern Romance languages are given; for example, Dalby lists 23 based on mutual intelligibility. The following, more extensive list, includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. Today, around 800 million people are native speakers of Romance languages worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Because it is difficult to assign to rigid categories phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following, more extensive list, includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. Today, around 800 million people are native speakers of Romance languages worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Because it is difficult to assign to rigid categories phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following, more extensive list, includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish (Castilian), Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The 800 million people are native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign to rigid categories phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish (Castilian), Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The 800 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign to rigid categories phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish (Castilian), Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The 800 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign to rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes 35 current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish (Castilian), Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The 800 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign to rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish (Castilian), Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The 800 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish (Castilian), Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish (Castilian), Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish (Castilian), Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish (Castilian), Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. The more bogas native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Sardinian and then Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries.They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Sardinian and then Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the five major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, then Romanian, then Portuguese, and then French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and then Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (66 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and then Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), German (95 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa, as well as elsewhere. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers, and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua francas. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • F R O G G E R }} The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of these, Italian is the closest to Latin together with Sardinian, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is close to it as much as Romanian. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Old Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish)]]; * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • {{Sidebar| name = English language| bodyclass = hlist| contentstyle = padding-bottom:0.6em;| pretitle = Part of a series on the| title = English language | heading1 = Topics| content1 = * English language * English-speaking world * English as a second language * History of English | heading2 = Advanced topics| content2 = * English as a lingua franca * European language * Modern English * Loanwords in English | heading3 = Phonology| content3 = * Phonological history of English * English phonology | heading4 = Dialects| content4 = * English * American * Anguillian * Antiguan * Australian * Bahamian * Bajan * Bay Islands * Belizean * Bermudian * Brunei * Burmese * Cameroonian * Canadian * Caribbean * Falkland Islands * Fijian * Gambian * Guyanese * Ghanaian * Indian * Irish * Jamaican * Kenyan * Liberian * Malawian * Malaysian * Manx * Namlish * Nepali * New Zealand * Nigerian * Pakistani * Philippine * San Andrés–Providencia The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish)]]; * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • {{Infobox language family chiken buttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt|name = Romance|region = Originated in [[Ol |mapcaption = Official language Co-official or coexists with other languages Cultural or secondary language |map2 = Romance languages.png|mapcaption2 = European Romance languages}} The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish)]]; * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages or "Roman languages" (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (10 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (10 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Mirandese, Asturian, Leonese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (10 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian (standard known as Daco-Romanian), Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (10 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (ten million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (four million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (four million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (four million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.5 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary, and no count is definitively complete. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following, which could be expanded, includes those and some other living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Sardinian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Sardinian is the closest to Latin, followed by Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian and Moldovan, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and Occitan is closer to Latin than French. However, all Romance languages are closer to each other than to classical Latin. The more than 900 million native speakers of Romance languages are found worldwide, mainly in the Americas, Europe, and parts of Africa. The major Romance languages also have many non-native speakers and are in widespread use as lingua franca. This is especially true of French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Djibouti, Lebanon, and North Africa (excluding Egypt, where it is a minority language). Because it is difficult to assign rigid categories to phenomena such as languages, which exist on a continuum, estimates of the number of modern Romance languages vary. For example, Dalby lists 23, based on the criterion of mutual intelligibility. The following includes those and additional current, living languages, and one extinct language, Dalmatian: * Ibero-Romance: Portuguese, Galician, Asturleonese/Mirandese, Spanish, Aragonese, Ladino (Judaeo-Spanish); * Occitano-Romance: Catalan/Valencian, Occitan (lenga d'oc), Gascon; * Gallo-Romance: French/Oïl languages, Franco-Provençal (Arpitan); * Rhaeto-Romance: Romansh, Ladin, Friulian; * Gallo-Italic: Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol; * Italo-Dalmatian: Italian, Tuscan, Romanesco, Corsican, Sassarese, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Dalmatian (extinct in 1898), Venetian (classification disputed), Istriot; * Sardinian; * Eastern Romance: Romanian, Istro-Romanian, Megleno-Romanian, Aromanian. (en)
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  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (221 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). (en)
  • Egg }} The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. (en)
  • The Romance languages (nowadays rarely Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Sardinian and then Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries.They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of those, Sardinian and then Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the five major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, then Romanian, then Portuguese, and then French. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and then Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (66 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and then Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), German (95 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. (en)
  • F R O G G E R }} The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Among the various Romance languages, Sardinian and Italian are the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of these, Italian is the closest to Latin together with Sardinian, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is close to it as much as Romanian. (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (255 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is clos (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is clos (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Old Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and that Occitan is (en)
  • {{Sidebar| name = English language| bodyclass = hlist| contentstyle = padding-bottom:0.6em;| pretitle = Part of a series on the| title = English language | heading1 = Topics| content1 = * English language * English-speaking world * English as a second language * History of English | heading2 = Advanced topics| content2 = * English as a lingua franca * European language * Modern English * Loanwords in English | heading3 = Phonology| content3 = * Phonological history of English * English phonology | heading4 = Dialects| content4 = (en)
  • {{Infobox language family chiken buttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt|name = Romance|region = Originated in [[Ol |mapcaption = Official language Co-official or coexists with other languages Cultural or secondary language |map2 = Romance languages.png|mapcaption2 = European Romance languages}} (en)
  • The Romance languages or "Roman languages" (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), and Romanian (24 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (10 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin an (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (10 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (ten million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin an (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (65 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (four million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin a (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (480 million), Portuguese (270 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (four million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin a (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (four million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin a (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.5 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin an (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin an (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Sardinian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Sardinian is the closest to Latin, followed by Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, it is seen that Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated fr (en)
  • The Romance languages (less commonly Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that evolved from Vulgar Latin between the third and eighth centuries. They are a subgroup of the Italic languages in the Indo-European language family. The six most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (489 million), Portuguese (250 million), French (77 million), Italian (67 million), Romanian (24 million), and Catalan (4.1 million). Of the major Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin, followed by Spanish, Romanian, Portuguese, and the most divergent being French. Taking into account all the Romance languages, including national and regional languages, Sardinian and Italian are together the least differentiated from Latin and Occitan is clo (en)
rdfs:label
  • Romance languages (en)
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