A record producer or music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. A producer may also:

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  • A record producer or music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. A producer may also: * Select session musicians to play rhythm section accompaniment parts or solos * Co-write * Propose changes to the song arrangements * Coach the singers and musicians in the studio The producer typically supervises the entire process from preproduction, through to the sound recording and mixing stages, and, in some cases, all the way to the audio mastering stage. The producer may perform these roles themselves, or help select the engineer, and provide suggestions to the engineer. The producer may also pay session musicians and engineers and ensure that the entire project is completed within the record label's budget. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. People often confuse music producers with "beat makers," however, music producers have a much greater and broader skill-set than just putting together sounds. A producer may also: * Select session musicians to play rhythm section accompaniment parts or solos * Co-write * Propose changes to the song arrangements * Coach the singers and musicians in the studio The producer typically supervises the entire process from preproduction, through to the sound recording and mixing stages, and, in some cases, all the way to the audio mastering stage. The producer may perform these roles themselves, or help select the engineer, and provide suggestions to the engineer. The producer may also pay session musicians and engineers and ensure that the entire project is completed within the record label's budget. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—a role now often categorized as a audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, largely responsible for the musical sound itself, are mainly electronic composers, directing and creating a song's instrumental section while perhaps coaching the musical act. Taking varying roles during recording, producers may gather musical ideas for the project, help the artists improve their songs, as in lyrics or arrangements, and may even collaborate with the artists by appearing in the recording. A producer may also: * Select session musicians to play rhythm section accompaniment parts or solos * Co-write * Propose changes to the song arrangements * Coach the singers and musicians in the studio The producer typically supervises the entire process from preproduction, through to the sound recording and mixing stages, and, in some cases, all the way to the audio mastering stage. The producer may perform these roles themselves, or help select the engineer, and provide suggestions to the engineer. The producer may also pay session musicians and engineers and ensure that the entire project is completed within the record label's budget. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—a role now often categorized as an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, largely responsible for the musical sound itself, are mainly electronic composers, directing and creating a song's instrumental section while perhaps also coaching the musical act. Taking varying roles during recording, producers may gather musical ideas for the project, help the artists improve their songs, as in lyrics or arrangements, and may even collaborate with the artists by appearing in the recording. A producer may also: * Select session musicians to play rhythm section accompaniment parts or solos * Co-write * Propose changes to the song arrangements * Coach the singers and musicians in the studio The producer typically supervises the entire process from preproduction, through to the sound recording and mixing stages, and, in some cases, all the way to the audio mastering stage. The producer may perform these roles themselves, or help select the engineer, and provide suggestions to the engineer. The producer may also pay session musicians and engineers and ensure that the entire project is completed within the record label's budget. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas record producers, now largely responsible for the musical sound itself, are mainly electronic composers who direct and create a song's instrumental section while perhaps also coaching the musical act. (The executive producer, rather, manages funding.) Typically helping choose the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process—preproduction, recording, mixing, and even mastering—or the producer may both produce and engineer. Thus taking varying roles before, during, and after recording itself, producers may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, now largely responsible for the musical sound itself, are mainly electronic composers who direct and create a song's instrumental section while perhaps also coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead manages funding.) Typically helping choose the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process—preproduction, recording, mixing, and even mastering—or the producer may both produce and engineer. Thus taking varying roles before, during, and after literal recording, producers may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, directing or creating the musical sound and song structure, are mainly music composers who arrange the vocal and instrument contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead manages the financing and so on.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. Sometimes doubling as the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process of creating a finished recording: preproduction, recording, mixing, and perhaps even mastering. For some projects, a producer also chooses all of the recording artists. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, directing or creating the musical sound and song structure, are mainly music composers who arrange the vocal and instrument contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. Sometimes doubling as the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process of creating a finished recording: preproduction, recording, mixing, and perhaps even mastering. For some projects, the producer also chooses all of the recording artists. Music producers are likened to film directors. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, directing or creating the musical sound and song structure, are mainly music composers who arrange the vocal and instrumental contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. Sometimes doubling as the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process of creating a finished recording: preproduction, recording, mixing, and perhaps even mastering. For some projects, the producer also chooses all of the recording artists. Music producers are likened to film directors. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was once the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, directing or creating the musical sound and song structure, are mainly music composers who arrange the vocal and instrumental contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. Sometimes doubling as the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process of creating a finished recording: preproduction, recording, mixing, and perhaps even mastering. For some projects, the producer also chooses all of the recording artists. Music producers are likened to film directors. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. A producer may also: * Select session musicians to play rhythm section accompaniment parts or solos * Co-write * Propose changes to the song arrangements * Coach the singers and musicians in the studio The producer typically supervises the entire process from preproduction, through to the sound recording and mixing stages, and, in some cases, all the way to the audio mastering stage. The producer may perform these roles themselves, or help select the engineer, and provide suggestions to the engineer. The producer may also pay session musicians and engineers and ensure that the entire project is completed within the record label's budget.The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. Sometimes doubling as the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process of creating a finished recording: preproduction, recording, mixing, and perhaps even mastering. For some projects, the producer also chooses all of the recording artists. Music producers are likened to film directors. (en)
  • A record producer also known as a music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. The producer typically supervises the entire process from preproduction, through to the sound recording and mixing stages, and, in some cases, all the way to the audio mastering stage. The producer may perform these roles themselves, or help select the engineer, and provide suggestions to the engineer. The producer may also pay session musicians and engineers and ensure that the entire project is completed within the record label's budget.The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. Sometimes doubling as the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process of creating a finished recording: preproduction, recording, mixing, and perhaps even mastering. For some projects, the producer also chooses all of the recording artists. Music producers are likened to film directors. (en)
  • A record producer also known as a music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. The producer typically supervises the entire process from preproduction, through to the sound recording and mixing stages, and, in some cases, all the way to the audio mastering stage. The producer may perform these roles themselves, or help select the engineer, and provide suggestions to the engineer. The producer may also pay session musicians and engineers and ensure that the entire project is completed within the record label's budget.The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. Sometimes doubling as the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process of creating a finished recording: preproduction, recording, mixing, and perhaps even mastering. For some projects, the producer also chooses all of the recording artists. Music producers are likened to film directors. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, formerly a managerial role overseeing or a technical role operating a musical act's sound recording—roles now an A&R manager's or an audio engineer's—is mainly a creative role as a music composer, crafting and directing the musical sound and song structure by arranging the instrumental and vocal contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, help improve the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. Sometimes doubling as the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process of creating a finished recording: preproduction, recording, mixing, and perhaps even mastering. For some projects, the producer also chooses all of the recording artists. Music producers are likened to film directors. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, now a role distinct from merely supervising a music artist's sound recording or operating the technical equipment—roles now often an A&R director's or an audio engineer's—is primarily a creative role, directing and composing the musical sound and song structure by arranging instrumental and vocal elements while often coaching the artists. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, contribute to the song's lyrics or instrumentation, hire session musicians, play instruments, cowrite, or even publicly appear by name in the recording. Sometimes doubling as the engineer, the producer may supervise the entire process of creating a finished recording: preproduction, recording, mixing, and perhaps even mastering. For some projects, the producer also chooses all of the recording artists. Music producers are likened to film directors. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the audio equipment involved in making and refining a music recording—a role now typically an audio engineer's—is the primarily director and, especially in popular music, is commonly the composer of a song's musical sound and structure. Commanding studio time, and holding ultimate control over the recording project's creative and technical decisions, the producer chooses instrumental and vocal elements and arrangements, and is likened to a film director. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, refine lyrics or instrumentation, cowrite, hire session musicians, or play instruments. In popular genres, the producer often fully creates the instrumental section, while a star producer may openly perform vocals. In some projects, the producer chooses all of the recording artists. Conversely, some artists are their own producers, whereas some producers, composing only synthesized and sampled music, are the only artists. Meanwhile, some producers are their own engineers, not merely directing but in fact operating all steps of making a recording ready for release: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Early in the recording industry, "A&R men," as precursors of record producers, blended entrepreneurial, technical, and creative roles, alike today's producers and engineers. Still, many A&R directors had negligible creative influence. Into the 1950s, record production's goal was mainly a recording sounding as close as possible to the live performance. But advances in recording technology—especially tape recording in the late 1940s, promptly revised by Les Paul to develop multitrack recording, and electronic equipment in the 1950s—turned record production into a specialty. Thereupon, producers like Phil Spector, George Martin, and Brian Eno moved production into its present focus in popular music, creating songs impossible to originate live. And since the 1990s, digital recording has further expanded possibilities. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the audio equipment involved in making and refining a music recording—a role now typically an audio engineer's—is the primarily director and, especially in popular music, is commonly the composer of a song's musical sound and structure. Commanding studio time, and holding ultimate control over the recording project's creative and technical decisions, the producer chooses instrumental and vocal elements and arrangements, and is likened to a film director. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, refine lyrics or instrumentation, cowrite, hire session musicians, or play instruments. In popular genres, the producer often fully creates the instrumental section, while a star producer may openly perform vocals. In some projects, the producer chooses all of the recording artists. Conversely, some artists are their own producers, whereas some producers, composing only synthesized and sampled music, are the only artists. Meanwhile, some producers are their own engineers, not merely directing but in fact operating all steps of making a recording ready for release: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Early in the recording industry, "A&R men," as precursors of record producers, blended entrepreneurial, technical, and creative roles, alike today's producers and engineers. Still, many A&R directors had negligible creative influence. Into the 1950s, record production's goal was mainly a recording to sound as close as possible to the live performance. Yet advances in recording technology—especially tape recording in the late 1940s, promptly revised by Les Paul to originate multitrack recording, and electronic equipment in the 1950s—turned record production into a specialty. Thereupon, in popular music, producers like Phil Spector, George Martin, and Brian Eno moved production into its present focus, creating songs impossible to originate live. Since the 1990s, digital recording has further expanded possibilities. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the audio equipment involved in making and refining a music recording—a role now typically an audio engineer's—is primarily the director and, especially in popular music, is commonly the composer of a song's musical sound and structure. Commanding studio time, choosing instrumental and vocal elements and arrangements, and holding ultimate control over the recording project's creative and technical decisions, the producer is likened to a film director. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, suggest or refine lyrics or instrumentation, cowrite, hire session musicians, or play instruments. In popular genres, the producer often fully creates the instrumental section, while a star producer may openly perform vocals. In some projects, the producer chooses all of the recording artists. Conversely, some music artists do their own record production, whereas some producers, creating only synthesized and sampled instrumentation, are the sole artists. Meanwhile, some producers are their own engineers, not merely directing but in fact operating all steps of making a recording ready for release: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Early in the recording industry, "A&R men," as precursors of record producers, had blended entrepreneurial, technical, and creative roles, alike today's producers and engineers. Still, many A&R directors had negligible creative influence. Into the 1950s, record production's focus was making a recording that sounds as close as possible to the live performance. Yet advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul in 1948 revised to originate multitrack recording—and the 1950s emergence of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. Thereupon, in popular music, producers like Phil Spector, George Martin, and Brian Eno moved production into its present focus, creating songs impossible to originate live. Since the 1990s, digital recording has further expanded possibilities. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the audio equipment involved in making and refining a music recording—a role now typically an audio engineer's—is primarily the director and, especially in popular music, is commonly the composer of a song's musical sound and structure. Commanding studio time, choosing instrumental and vocal elements and arrangements, and holding ultimate control over the recording project's creative and technical decisions, the producer is likened to a film director. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) The producer may gather musical ideas or samples, suggest or refine lyrics or instrumentation, cowrite, hire session musicians, or play instruments. In popular genres, the producer often fully creates the instrumental section, while a star producer may openly perform vocals. In some projects, the producer chooses all of the recording artists. Conversely, some music artists do their own record production, whereas some producers, creating only synthesized and sampled instrumentation, are the sole artists. Meanwhile, some producers are their own engineers, not merely directing but in fact operating all steps of making a recording ready for release: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. The precursors of record producers were "A&R men," who, alike today's producers and engineers, blended entrepreneurial, technical, and creative roles. Yet they often exercised scant creative influence, as record production's main goal remained simply a record sounding like the live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul in 1948 revised to originate multitrack recording—and the 1950s emergence of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. Thereupon, in popular music, producers like Phil Spector, George Martin, and Brian Eno drove the present focus, unrealistic sounds and songs impossible to originate live. Since the 1990s, digital recording has further expanded possibilities. And the 2010s brought some efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers who are women. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the technology of making and refining a music recording—a role now an audio engineer's—is the recording project's creative and technical leader, who in popular genres typically composes the song's sound and structure. A record producer, often called simply a producer, commanding studio time and coaching the music artists, is likened to a film director. (The executive producer enables the project via financing and entrepreneurship.) Varying by project, the producer may choose all of the artists, openly perform vocals, or, if creating only synthesized and sampled instrumentation, be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. The precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, technical, and creative roles, but often had scant creative influence, as production focused on increasing records' sonic match to live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul in 1948 revised to originate multitrack recording—and the 1950s emergence of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialized profession. Thereupon, in popular music, producers like Phil Spector, George Martin, and Brian Eno drove the present focus, unrealistic sounds and songs impossible to originate live. Since the 1990s, digital recording has further expanded possibilities. And the 2010s brought some efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers who are women. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the technology of making and refining a music recording—a role now an audio engineer's—is the recording project's creative and technical leader, who in popular genres typically composes the song's sound and structure. A record producer, often called simply a producer, commanding studio time and coaching the music artists, is likened to a film director. (The executive producer enables the project via financing and entrepreneurship.) Varying by project, the producer may choose all of the artists, openly perform vocals, or, if creating only synthesized and sampled instrumentation, be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. The precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, technical, and creative roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, since production still focused on increasing records' sonic match to live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul in 1948 revised to originate multitrack recording—and the 1950s emergence of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialized profession. Thereupon, in popular music, producers like Phil Spector, George Martin, and Brian Eno drove the present focus, unrealistic sounds and songs impossible to originate live. Since the 1990s, digital recording has further expanded possibilities. And in the late 2010s, some efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the technology of making and refining a music recording—a role now an audio engineer's—is the recording project's creative and technical leader, who in popular genres typically creates the song's sound and structure. Whereas the executive producer enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, the record producer, often called simply the producer, commanding studio time and coaching the music artists, is likened to a film director. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If creating only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, technical, and creative roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul by 1950 had further innovated to originate multitrack recording—and the 1950s emergence of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. Thereupon, in popular music, producers like Phil Spector, George Martin, and Brian Eno led production's evolution into its present reliance on elaborate recording techniques and unrealistic sounds to create songs impossible to originate live. Since the 1990s, digital recording has further expanded possibilities, including production on an ordinary computer and solitary development of production skill in a home studio. In the 2010s, some efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, unlike an audio engineer, who simply operates the technology employed in a music recording's creation and refinement, is the recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If creating only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, technical, and creative roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul by 1950 had further innovated to originate multitrack recording—and the 1950s emergence of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. Thereupon, in popular music, producers like Phil Spector, George Martin, and Brian Eno led production's evolution into its present reliance on elaborate recording techniques and unrealistic sounds to create songs impossible to originate live. Since the 1990s, digital recording has further expanded possibilities, including production on an ordinary computer and solitary development of production skill in a home studio. In the 2010s, some efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, unlike an audio engineer, who simply operates the technology employed in a music recording's creation and refinement, is the recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like Phil Spector, George Martin, and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, unlike an audio engineer, who simply operates the technology employed in a music recording's creation and refinement, is the recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, Phil Spector and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • HuntingA record producer or music producer, unlike an audio engineer, who simply operates the technology employed in a music recording's creation and refinement, is the recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, Phil Spector and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, unlike an audio engineer, who operates the technology employed in a music recording's creation and refinement, is the recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, Phil Spector and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer is a recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, and an audio engineer operates the technology. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, Phil Spector and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer is a recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, and an audio engineer operates the technology. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, [[Eugene Killeen] and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer is a recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, and an audio engineer operates the technology. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, Eugene Killeen and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer is a recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, and an audio engineer operates the technology. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. And some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, [[Phil Spector) and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer is a recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, and an audio engineer operates the technology. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. Some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, Phil Spector and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer is a recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, and an audio engineer operates the technology. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artist, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. Some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, Phil Spector and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. (en)
  • {{(Infobox-ccupation)(|name)=(Record-producer)|(image)=||[official_names]=[Record producer music producer] (en)
  • A record producer or music producer is a recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, and an audio engineer operates the technology. Varying by project, the producer may also choose all of the artists, or openly perform vocals with them. If employing only synthesized or sampled instrumentation, the producer may be the sole artist. Conversely, some artists do their own production. Some producers are their own engineers, operating the technology across the project: preproduction, recording, mixing, and mastering. Record producers' precursors were "A&R men," who likewise could blend entrepreneurial, creative, and technical roles, but often exercised scant creative influence, as record production still focused, into the 1950s, on simply improving the record's sonic match to the artists' own live performance. Advances in recording technology, especially the 1940s advent of tape recording—which Les Paul promptly innovated further to develop multitrack recording—and the 1950s rise of electronic instruments, turned record production into a specialty. In popular music, then, producers like George Martin, Phil Spector and Brian Eno led its evolution into its present use of elaborate techniques and unrealistic sounds, creating songs impossible to originate live. After the 1980s, production's move from analog to digital further expanded possibilities. By now, DAWS, or digital audio workstations, like Logic Pro and Pro Tools, turn an ordinary computer into a production console, whereby a solitary novice can become a skilled producer in a thrifty home studio. In the 2010s, efforts began to increase the prevalence of producers and engineers who are women, heavily outnumbered by men and prominently accoladed only in classical music. I am your biggest fan CAN I LISTEN TO THE MUSIC (en)
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  • A record producer or music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. A producer may also: (en)
  • A record producer or music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. People often confuse music producers with "beat makers," however, music producers have a much greater and broader skill-set than just putting together sounds. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—a role now often categorized as a audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, largely responsible for the musical sound itself, are mainly electronic composers, directing and creating a song's instrumental section while perhaps coaching the musical act. Taking varying roles during recording, producers may gather musical ideas for the project, help the artists improve their songs, as in lyrics or arrangements, and may even collaborate with the artists by appearing in the recording. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—a role now often categorized as an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, largely responsible for the musical sound itself, are mainly electronic composers, directing and creating a song's instrumental section while perhaps also coaching the musical act. Taking varying roles during recording, producers may gather musical ideas for the project, help the artists improve their songs, as in lyrics or arrangements, and may even collaborate with the artists by appearing in the recording. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas record producers, now largely responsible for the musical sound itself, are mainly electronic composers who direct and create a song's instrumental section while perhaps also coaching the musical act. (The executive producer, rather, manages funding.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, now largely responsible for the musical sound itself, are mainly electronic composers who direct and create a song's instrumental section while perhaps also coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead manages funding.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, directing or creating the musical sound and song structure, are mainly music composers who arrange the vocal and instrument contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead manages the financing and so on.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, directing or creating the musical sound and song structure, are mainly music composers who arrange the vocal and instrument contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was classically the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, directing or creating the musical sound and song structure, are mainly music composers who arrange the vocal and instrumental contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer was once the overseer or operator of a musical act's sound recording and its refinement—roles now typically an audio engineer's—whereas today's record producers, directing or creating the musical sound and song structure, are mainly music composers who arrange the vocal and instrumental contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) (en)
  • A record producer also known as a music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. (en)
  • A record producer also known as a music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album. A producer has many, varying roles during the recording process. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, formerly a managerial role overseeing or a technical role operating a musical act's sound recording—roles now an A&R manager's or an audio engineer's—is mainly a creative role as a music composer, crafting and directing the musical sound and song structure by arranging the instrumental and vocal contributions while often coaching the musical act. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, now a role distinct from merely supervising a music artist's sound recording or operating the technical equipment—roles now often an A&R director's or an audio engineer's—is primarily a creative role, directing and composing the musical sound and song structure by arranging instrumental and vocal elements while often coaching the artists. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the audio equipment involved in making and refining a music recording—a role now typically an audio engineer's—is the primarily director and, especially in popular music, is commonly the composer of a song's musical sound and structure. Commanding studio time, and holding ultimate control over the recording project's creative and technical decisions, the producer chooses instrumental and vocal elements and arrangements, and is likened to a film director. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the audio equipment involved in making and refining a music recording—a role now typically an audio engineer's—is primarily the director and, especially in popular music, is commonly the composer of a song's musical sound and structure. Commanding studio time, choosing instrumental and vocal elements and arrangements, and holding ultimate control over the recording project's creative and technical decisions, the producer is likened to a film director. (The executive producer instead enables the project by arranging its financing and business partnerships.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the technology of making and refining a music recording—a role now an audio engineer's—is the recording project's creative and technical leader, who in popular genres typically composes the song's sound and structure. A record producer, often called simply a producer, commanding studio time and coaching the music artists, is likened to a film director. (The executive producer enables the project via financing and entrepreneurship.) (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, a role now distinct from simply operating the technology of making and refining a music recording—a role now an audio engineer's—is the recording project's creative and technical leader, who in popular genres typically creates the song's sound and structure. Whereas the executive producer enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, the record producer, often called simply the producer, commanding studio time and coaching the music artists, is likened to a film director. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, unlike an audio engineer, who simply operates the technology employed in a music recording's creation and refinement, is the recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship. (en)
  • HuntingA record producer or music producer, unlike an audio engineer, who simply operates the technology employed in a music recording's creation and refinement, is the recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer, unlike an audio engineer, who operates the technology employed in a music recording's creation and refinement, is the recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship. (en)
  • A record producer or music producer is a recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, and an audio engineer operates the technology. (en)
  • {{(Infobox-ccupation)(|name)=(Record-producer)|(image)=||[official_names]=[Record producer music producer] (en)
  • A record producer or music producer is a recording project's creative and technical leader, commanding studio time and coaching artists, and in popular genres typically creates the song's very sound and structure. The record producer, or simply the producer, is likened to a film director. The executive producer, on the other hand, enables the recording project through entrepreneurship, and an audio engineer operates the technology. I am your biggest fan CAN I LISTEN TO THE MUSIC (en)
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  • Record producer (en)
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