Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows four characters, represented by bare hand puppets with eyes and accessories, on their everyday adventures. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was a joint venture between Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. Two sets of 13-minute episodes aired on Noggin and Nickelodeon from April 2003 to February 2005.

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  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows four characters, represented by bare hand puppets with eyes and accessories, on their everyday adventures. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was a joint venture between Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. Two sets of 13-minute episodes aired on Noggin and Nickelodeon from April 2003 to February 2005. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Ulica Sezamkowa, the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The series features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch in starring roles. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simplified sentences, using only two to three words at a time. The puppets have been compared to those of ventriloquist Señor Wences and were billed as "furless" Muppets in promotional statements. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Melbourne Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has commented that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi posted a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among the preschool age group by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin original program, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows four characters, represented by bare hand puppets with eyes and accessories, on their everyday adventures. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was a joint venture between Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. Two sets of 13-minute episodes aired on Noggin and Nickelodeon from 2000 to February 2005. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Ulica Sezamkowa, the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The series features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch in starring roles. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simplified sentences, using only two to three words at a time. The puppets have been compared to those of ventriloquist Señor Wences and were billed as "furless" Muppets in promotional statements. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Melbourne Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has commented that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi posted a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among the preschool age group by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin original program, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows four characters, represented by bare hand puppets with eyes and accessories, on their everyday adventures. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was a joint venture between Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. Two sets of 13-minute episodes aired on Noggin and Nickelodeon from April 2003 to February 2005. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Ulica Sezamkowa, the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The series features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch in starring roles. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simplified sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Melbourne Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has commented that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi posted a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among the preschool age group by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin original program, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows four characters, represented by bare hand puppets with eyes and accessories, on their everyday adventures. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was a joint venture between Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. Two sets of 13-minute episodes aired on Noggin and Nickelodeon from April 2003 to February 2005. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Ulica Sezamkowa, the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The series features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch in starring roles. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Melbourne Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has commented that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi posted a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among the preschool age group by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows four characters, represented by bare hand puppets with eyes and accessories, on their everyday adventures. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. It was later developed into a full-length series, with longer 13-minute episodes airing from April 2003 to February 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Ulica Sezamkowa, the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The series features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch in starring roles. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Melbourne Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has commented that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi posted a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among the preschool age group by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. It was later developed into a full-length series, with longer 13-minute episodes airing from April 2003 to February 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Ulica Sezamkowa, the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The series features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch in starring roles. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has commented that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi posted a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among the preschool age group by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American educaional children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. It follows a hand puppet named Oobi, who has adventures with his sister an child friend, Uma, his cousin Kako and his grandfather Grandpu. Each episode takes place outside and inside Oobi's House, such as when Uma used the potty and when Oobi gets his first ever haircut. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. It was later developed into a full-length series, with longer 13-minute episodes airing from April 2003 to February 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Ulica Sezamkowa, the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios in New York, where Sesame Street is also taped. The series features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch in starring roles. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has commented that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi posted a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among the preschool age group by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. It was later developed into a long-form series, with 13-minute episodes airing from April 2003 to February 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The show features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch as the main characters. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their bare hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has commented that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among the preschool age group by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. It was later developed into a long-form series, with 13-minute episodes airing from April 2003 to February 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The show features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch as the main characters. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their bare hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. For its second season, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The show features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch as the main characters. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their bare hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. For its second season, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. Selig founded created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. Also, the production logo of its company, Little Airplane Productions also uses the bridge from the Sesame Street song, "I'm a Little Airplane" with a child. The show features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch as the main characters. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their bare hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi was an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. For its second season, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. Selig created the series shortly after leaving Sesame Street, which he had worked on since its first season. He developed the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for the Polish version of Sesame Street. Roles on Oobi were offered to veteran puppeteers from related Sesame Workshop shows. The Jim Henson Company, which designed the puppets on Sesame Street, held a stake in Noggin when Oobi was produced. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. The show features Muppet performers Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch as the main characters. Oobi's concept is based on a technique used by puppeteers learning to lip-sync, in which they use their bare hands and a pair of ping pong balls in place of a puppet. The characters' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. Selig was a longtime writer and performer for Sesame Street, and he came up with the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Sesame Street. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. All of the show's puppeteers were veteran Muppet performers. The main characters were played by Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch. The puppets' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. The show's ending credits feature a montage of families making and playing with their own bare-hand Oobi puppets. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American-Canadian children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. Selig was a longtime writer and performer for Sesame Street, and he came up with the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Sesame Street. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. All of the show's puppeteers were veteran Muppet performers. The main characters were played by Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch. The puppets' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. The show's ending credits feature a montage of families making and playing with their own bare-hand Oobi puppets. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • {{Infobox television| name = Oobi| image = Oobi title card.png| image_size = 250px | genre = * Puppetry * Comedy | creator = Josh Selig | director = * Tim Lagasse * Josh Selig * Pam Arciero * Kevin Lombard * Scott Preston | writer = * Scott Cameron * Natascha Crandall * Christine Nee * Sascha Paladino * Adam Rudman * Craig Shemin | starring = * Tim Lagasse * Stephanie D'Abruzzo * Noel MacNeal * Tyler Bunch | theme_music_composer = Jared Faber | composer = * Larry Hochman * Jeffrey Lesser * Christopher North | producer = * April Chadderdon * Lisa Simon | executive_producer = Josh Selig| location = * Kaufman Astoria Studios * Astoria, Queens, New York | cinematography = Randy Drummond | editor = * Ken Reynolds * John Tierney | camera = Videotape; Multi-camera | runtime = * 1–2 minutes (season 1) * 13 minutes (seasons 2–3) | company = Little Airplane ProductionsNoggin LLC| distributor = ViacomCBS Domestic Media Networks| country = United States| language = English| num_seasons = 3 | num_episodes = * Shorts: 48 * Long-form episodes: 52 | list_episodes = List of Oobi episodes | network = * Noggin * Nickelodeon | picture_format = NTSC (480i)| audio_format = Stereo| first_aired = 2000 | last_aired = * 2002(shorts) * April 7, 2003 – February 11, 2005(long-form) Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. Selig was a longtime writer and performer for Sesame Street, and he came up with the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Sesame Street. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. All of the show's puppeteers were veteran Muppet performers. The main characters were played by Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch. The puppets' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. The show's ending credits feature a montage of families making and playing with their own bare-hand Oobi puppets. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • {{Infobox television| name = Oobi| image = Oobi title card.png| image_size = 250px | genre = * Puppetry * Comedy | creator = Josh Selig | director = * Tim Lagasse * Josh Selig * Pam Arciero * Kevin Lombard * Scott Preston | writer = * Scott Cameron * Natascha Crandall * Christine Nee * Sascha Paladino * Adam Rudman * Craig Shemin | starring = * Tim Lagasse * Stephanie D'Abruzzo * Noel MacNeal * Tyler Bunch | theme_music_composer = Jared Faber | composer = * Larry Hochman * Jeffrey Lesser * Christopher North | producer = * April Chadderdon * Lisa Simon | executive_producer = Josh Selig| location = * Kaufman Astoria Studios * Astoria, Queens, New York | cinematography = Randy Drummond | editor = * Ken Reynolds * John Tierney | camera = Videotape; Multi-camera | runtime = * 1–2 minutes (season 1) * 13 minutes (seasons 2–3) | company = Little Airplane ProductionsNoggin LLC| distributor = ViacomCBS Domestic Media Networks| country = United States| language = English| num_seasons = 3 | num_episodes = * Shorts: 48 * Long-form episodes: 52 | list_episodes = List of Oobi episodes | network = * Noggin * Nickelodeon | picture_format = NTSC (480i)| audio_format = Stereo| first_aired = 2000 | last_aired = * 2002(shorts) * April 7, 2003 – February , 2005 Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. Selig was a longtime writer and performer for Sesame Street, and he came up with the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Sesame Street. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. All of the show's puppeteers were veteran Muppet performers. The main characters were played by Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch. The puppets' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. The show's ending credits feature a montage of families making and playing with their own bare-hand Oobi puppets. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The first episode aired in 2000, and the final episode aired on February 11, 2005. Selig was a longtime writer and performer for Sesame Street, and he came up with the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Sesame Street. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. All of the show's puppeteers were veteran Muppet performers. The main characters were played by Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch. The puppets' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. The show's ending credits feature a montage of families making and playing with their own bare-hand Oobi puppets. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • {{short description/ A Brazil show} Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. Selig was a longtime writer and performer for Sesame Street, and he came up with the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Sesame Street. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. All of the show's puppeteers were veteran Muppet performers. The main characters were played by Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch. The puppets' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. The show's ending credits feature a montage of families making and playing with their own bare-hand Oobi puppets. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
  • Oobi (later known as Oobi and Uma on YouTube) is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. Selig was a longtime writer and performer for Sesame Street, and he came up with the idea for Oobi while watching bare-handed puppeteers audition for Sesame Street. The show was filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street is also taped. All of the show's puppeteers were veteran Muppet performers. The main characters were played by Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal, and Tyler Bunch. The puppets' designs include glass eyes and accessories such as hats and hairpieces. The puppeteers' thumbs are used to represent mouth movement, and their fingers flutter and clench to indicate emotions. The characters talk in simple sentences, using only two to three words at a time. The show's ending credits feature a montage of families making and playing with their own bare-hand Oobi puppets. Oobi was a breakout success for Noggin. It received positive reviews from critics, with praise for the puppeteers' performances, the visual style, and the show's appeal toward multiple age groups. The Age reported that the show developed a strong cult following among older viewers, and Noel MacNeal has said that the show's fans range from amateur puppeteers to "college-age stoners." The show received a variety of awards, including from the Television Academy and Parents' Choice. Oobi had a Nielsen rating of 2.35 among Noggin viewers by 2004, becoming the highest-rated series ever to air on Noggin. It is the most widely distributed Noggin show, having aired in over 23 markets worldwide by 2005. A foreign adaptation titled Oobi: Dasdasi premiered in 2012 and ran for 78 episodes, airing in the Middle East and countries across Asia. (en)
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  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows four characters, represented by bare hand puppets with eyes and accessories, on their everyday adventures. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was a joint venture between Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. Two sets of 13-minute episodes aired on Noggin and Nickelodeon from April 2003 to February 2005. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows four characters, represented by bare hand puppets with eyes and accessories, on their everyday adventures. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was a joint venture between Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. Two sets of 13-minute episodes aired on Noggin and Nickelodeon from 2000 to February 2005. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows four characters, represented by bare hand puppets with eyes and accessories, on their everyday adventures. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. It was later developed into a full-length series, with longer 13-minute episodes airing from April 2003 to February 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. It was later developed into a full-length series, with longer 13-minute episodes airing from April 2003 to February 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. (en)
  • Oobi is an American educaional children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. It follows a hand puppet named Oobi, who has adventures with his sister an child friend, Uma, his cousin Kako and his grandfather Grandpu. Each episode takes place outside and inside Oobi's House, such as when Uma used the potty and when Oobi gets his first ever haircut. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. It was later developed into a full-length series, with longer 13-minute episodes airing from April 2003 to February 2005. The show has t (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. It was later developed into a long-form series, with 13-minute episodes airing from April 2003 to February 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. For its second season, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. (en)
  • Oobi was an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show follows the everyday adventures of four bare hand puppet characters with eyes and accessories. It began in 2000 as a series of two-minute interstitial shorts commissioned by Noggin, which was jointly owned by Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop at the time. For its second season, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. The show has three seasons: the first season of shorts and two later seasons of long-form episodes. (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. (en)
  • Oobi is an American-Canadian children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. (en)
  • {{Infobox television| name = Oobi| image = Oobi title card.png| image_size = 250px | genre = * Puppetry * Comedy | creator = Josh Selig | director = * Tim Lagasse * Josh Selig * Pam Arciero * Kevin Lombard * Scott Preston | writer = * Scott Cameron * Natascha Crandall * Christine Nee * Sascha Paladino * Adam Rudman * Craig Shemin | starring = * Tim Lagasse * Stephanie D'Abruzzo * Noel MacNeal * Tyler Bunch | theme_music_composer = Jared Faber | composer = * Larry Hochman * Jeffrey Lesser * Christopher North | producer = * April Chadderdon * Lisa Simon | cinematography = Randy Drummond (en)
  • Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The first episode aired in 2000, and the final episode aired on February 11, 2005. (en)
  • {{short description/ A Brazil show} Oobi is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. (en)
  • Oobi (later known as Oobi and Uma on YouTube) is an American children's television series created by Josh Selig for Nickelodeon and its sister channel Noggin. The show's concept is based on a training method used by puppeteers, in which they use their hands and a pair of glass eyes instead of a full puppet. The main character is a bare hand puppet named Oobi. The show's first season was a series of two-minute shorts. For its second and third seasons, it became a long-form series, with episodes lasting 13 minutes each. The show premiered in 2000, and the last new episode aired on February 11, 2005. (en)
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  • Oobi (TV series) (en)
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