The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) is a bipartisan non-governmental organization (NGO) established in 1975 to serve the members and staff of state legislatures of the United States (states, commonwealths, and territories). NCSL has three objectives: to improve the quality and effectiveness of state legislatures; to promote policy innovation and communication among state legislatures; and to ensure state legislatures a strong, cohesive voice in the federal system. All state legislators and staff members are automatically members of NCSL.

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  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) is a bipartisan non-governmental organization (NGO) established in 1975 to serve the members and staff of state legislatures of the United States (states, commonwealths, and territories). NCSL has three objectives: to improve the quality and effectiveness of state legislatures; to promote policy innovation and communication among state legislatures; and to ensure state legislatures a strong, cohesive voice in the federal system. All state legislators and staff members are automatically members of NCSL. NCSL maintains two offices: one in Denver, Colorado, and the other in Washington, D.C. Eight Standing Committees, composed of legislators and legislative staff appointed by the leadership of the legislatures, serve as the central organizing mechanism for NCSL members. Each Committee provides a means by which state legislators can share experience, information, and advice on a variety of state issues ranging from policy to management. Committees meet together twice each year at NCSL's Fall Forum and NCSL's Legislative Summit to adopt state-federal legislative policies that will ultimately guide NCSLs' lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C. These committee meetings also serve as an opportunity for states to network and establish flows of information as well as experience-based suggestions from other states. In addition to the Capitol Forum and the Summit, NCSL builds the state legislative community by hosting various web seminars, leadership meetings, and access to relevant websites and online documents throughout the year. Issues spanning multiple committee jurisdictions are tackled by NCSL's Task Forces. Unlike the permanent Standing Committees, Task Forces are created for a specific period time and aim to develop positions on highly complex and controversial issues such as immigration reform and welfare. Task Forces are composed of 20 to 30 legislators and legislative staff who are appointed by the NCSL president or staff chair. Day-to-day operations of the organization are in the hands of its Executive Director, Tim Storey. The organization is led by a legislator who serves as its president and by a legislative staffer who serves as staff chair. Twenty years after its founding, NCSL was led in 1994 by its first female president, former Congresswoman Karen McCarthy. Its first African-American president, Rep. Dan Blue, served in 1998–99. The 2019–20 president of NCSL is Representative Robin Vos of Wisconsin, and the staff chair is Martha Wigton of Georgia. Each year, NCSL's presidency alternates between legislators of the Republican and Democratic parties. The NCSL is considered part of the 'Big Seven', a group of organizations that represent local and state government in the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) is a bipartisan non-governmental organization (NGO) established in 1975 to serve the members and staff of state legislatures of the United States (states, territories and commonwealths of the U.S.). Its mission is to advance the effectiveness, independence and integrity of legislatures and to foster interstate cooperation and facilitate the exchange of information among legislatures. NCSL also represents legislatures in dealing with the federal government, especially in support of state sovereignty and state flexibility and protection from unfunded federal mandates and unwarranted federal preemption. The conference promotes cooperation between state legislatures in the U.S. and those in other countries. In addition, NCSL is committed to improving the operations and management of state legislatures, and the effectiveness of legislators and legislative staff. NCSL also encourages the practice of high standards of conduct by legislators and legislative staff. NCSL maintains two offices: one in Denver, Colorado, and the other in Washington, D.C. Eight Standing Committees, composed of legislators and legislative staff appointed by the leadership of the legislatures, serve as the central organizing mechanism for NCSL members. Each Committee provides a means by which state legislators can share experience, information, and advice on a variety of state issues ranging from policy to management. Committees meet together twice each year at NCSL's Fall Forum and NCSL's Legislative Summit to adopt state-federal legislative policies that will ultimately guide NCSLs' lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C. These committee meetings also serve as an opportunity for states to network and establish flows of information as well as experience-based suggestions from other states. In addition to the Capitol Forum and the Summit, NCSL builds the state legislative community by hosting various web seminars, leadership meetings, and access to relevant websites and online documents throughout the year. Issues spanning multiple committee jurisdictions are tackled by NCSL's Task Forces. Unlike the permanent Standing Committees, Task Forces are created for a specific period time and aim to develop positions on highly complex and controversial issues such as immigration reform and welfare. Task Forces are composed of 20 to 30 legislators and legislative staff who are appointed by the NCSL president or staff chair. Day-to-day operations of the organization are in the hands of its Executive Director, Tim Storey. The organization is led by a legislator who serves as its president and by a legislative staffer who serves as staff chair. Twenty years after its founding, NCSL was led in 1994 by its first female president, former Congresswoman Karen McCarthy. Its first African-American president, Rep. Dan Blue, served in 1998–99. The 2019–20 president of NCSL is Representative Robin Vos of Wisconsin, and the staff chair is Martha Wigton of Georgia. Each year, NCSL's presidency alternates between legislators of the Republican and Democratic parties. The NCSL is considered part of the 'Big Seven', a group of organizations that represent local and state government in the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) is a bipartisan non-governmental organization (NGO) established in 1975 to serve the members and staff of state legislatures of the United States (states, territories and commonwealths of the U.S.). Its mission is to advance the effectiveness, independence and integrity of legislatures and to foster interstate cooperation and facilitate the exchange of information among legislatures. NCSL also represents legislatures in dealing with the federal government, especially in support of state sovereignty and state flexibility and protection from unfunded federal mandates and unwarranted federal preemption. The conference promotes cooperation between state legislatures in the U.S. and those in other countries. In addition, NCSL is committed to improving the operations and management of state legislatures, and the effectiveness of legislators and legislative staff. NCSL also encourages the practice of high standards of conduct by legislators and legislative staff. NCSL maintains two offices: one in Denver, Colorado, and the other in Washington, D.C. Eight Standing Committees, composed of legislators and legislative staff appointed by the leadership of the legislatures, serve as the central organizing mechanism for NCSL members. Each Committee provides a means by which state legislators can share experience, information, and advice on a variety of state issues ranging from policy to management. Committees meet together twice each year at the NCSL Capitol Forum and NCSL's Legislative Summit to adopt state-federal legislative policies that will ultimately guide NCSLs' lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C. These committee meetings also serve as an opportunity for states to network and establish flows of information as well as experience-based suggestions from other states. In addition to the NCSL Capitol Forum and the Legislative Summit, NCSL builds the state legislative community by hosting various web seminars, leadership meetings, and access to relevant websites and online documents throughout the year. Issues spanning multiple committee jurisdictions are tackled by NCSL's Task Forces. Unlike the permanent Standing Committees, Task Forces are created for a specific period time and aim to develop positions on highly complex and controversial issues such as immigration reform and welfare. Task Forces are composed of 20 to 30 legislators and legislative staff who are appointed by the NCSL president or staff chair. Day-to-day operations of the organization are in the hands of its Executive Director, Tim Storey. The organization is led by a legislator who serves as its president and by a legislative staffer who serves as staff chair. Twenty years after its founding, NCSL was led in 1994 by its first female president, former Congresswoman Karen McCarthy. Its first African-American president, Rep. Dan Blue, served in 1998–99. The 2019–20 president of NCSL is Representative Robin Vos of Wisconsin, and the staff chair is Martha Wigton of Georgia. Each year, NCSL's presidency alternates between legislators of the Republican and Democratic parties. The NCSL is considered part of the 'Big Seven', a group of organizations that represent local and state government in the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) is a bipartisan non-governmental organization (NGO) established in 1975 to serve the members and staff of state legislatures of the United States (states, territories and commonwealths of the U.S.). Its mission is to advance the effectiveness, independence and integrity of legislatures and to foster interstate cooperation and facilitate the exchange of information among legislatures. NCSL also represents legislatures in dealing with the federal government, especially in support of state sovereignty and state flexibility and protection from unfunded federal mandates and unwarranted federal preemption. The conference promotes cooperation between state legislatures in the U.S. and those in other countries. In addition, NCSL is committed to improving the operations and management of state legislatures, and the effectiveness of legislators and legislative staff. NCSL also encourages the practice of high standards of conduct by legislators and legislative staff. NCSL maintains two offices: one in Denver, Colorado, and the other in Washington, D.C. Eight Standing Committees, composed of legislators and legislative staff appointed by the leadership of the legislatures, serve as the central organizing mechanism for NCSL members. Each Committee provides a means by which state legislators can share experience, information, and advice on a variety of state issues ranging from policy to management. Committees meet together twice each year at the NCSL Capitol Forum and NCSL's Legislative Summit to adopt state-federal legislative policies that will ultimately guide NCSL's lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C. These committee meetings also serve as an opportunity for states to network and establish flows of information as well as experience-based suggestions from other states. In addition to the NCSL Capitol Forum and the Legislative Summit, NCSL builds the state legislative community by hosting various web seminars, leadership meetings, and access to relevant websites and online documents throughout the year. Issues spanning multiple committee jurisdictions are tackled by NCSL's Task Forces. Unlike the permanent Standing Committees, Task Forces are created for a specific period time and aim to develop positions on highly complex and controversial issues such as immigration reform and welfare. Task Forces are composed of 20 to 30 legislators and legislative staff who are appointed by the NCSL president or staff chair. Day-to-day operations of the organization are in the hands of its Executive Director, Tim Storey. The organization is led by a legislator who serves as its president and by a legislative staffer who serves as staff chair. Twenty years after its founding, NCSL was led in 1994 by its first female president, former Congresswoman Karen McCarthy. Its first African-American president, Rep. Dan Blue, served in 1998–99. The 2019–20 president of NCSL is Representative Robin Vos of Wisconsin, and the staff chair is Martha Wigton of Georgia. Each year, NCSL's presidency alternates between legislators of the Republican and Democratic parties. The NCSL is considered part of the 'Big Seven', a group of organizations that represent local and state government in the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), established in 1975, is a "nonpartisan public officials’ association composed of sitting state legislators" from the states, territories and commonwealths of the United States. According to their website, the mission of the Conference is to advance the effectiveness, independence and integrity of legislatures and to foster interstate cooperation . . . especially in support of state sovereignty and state flexibility and protection from unfunded federal mandates and unwarranted federal preemption. The conference promotes cooperation between state legislatures in the U.S. and those in other countries. . . . [and] is committed to improving the operations and management of state legislatures, and the effectiveness of legislators and legislative staff. NCSL also encourages the practice of high standards of conduct by legislators and legislative staff. NCSL maintains two offices: one in Denver, Colorado, and the other in Washington, D.C. Eight Standing Committees, composed of legislators and legislative staff appointed by the leadership of the legislatures, serve as the central organizing mechanism for NCSL members. Each Committee provides a means by which state legislators can share experience, information, and advice on a variety of state issues ranging from policy to management. Committees meet together twice each year at the NCSL Capitol Forum and NCSL's Legislative Summit to adopt state-federal legislative policies that will ultimately guide NCSL's lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C. These committee meetings also serve as an opportunity for states to network and establish flows of information as well as experience-based suggestions from other states. In addition to the NCSL Capitol Forum and the Legislative Summit, NCSL builds the state legislative community by hosting various web seminars, leadership meetings, and access to relevant websites and online documents throughout the year. Issues spanning multiple committee jurisdictions are tackled by NCSL's Task Forces. Unlike the permanent Standing Committees, Task Forces are created for a specific period time and aim to develop positions on highly complex and controversial issues such as immigration reform and welfare. Task Forces are composed of 20 to 30 legislators and legislative staff who are appointed by the NCSL president or staff chair. Day-to-day operations of the organization are in the hands of its Executive Director, Tim Storey. The organization is led by a legislator who serves as its president and by a legislative staffer who serves as staff chair. Twenty years after its founding, NCSL was led in 1994 by its first female president, former Congresswoman Karen McCarthy. Its first African-American president, Rep. Dan Blue, served in 1998–99. The 2019–20 president of NCSL is Representative Robin Vos of Wisconsin, and the staff chair is Martha Wigton of Georgia. Each year, NCSL's presidency alternates between legislators of the Republican and Democratic parties. The NCSL is considered part of the 'Big Seven', a group of organizations that represent local and state government in the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), established in 1975, is a bipartisan organization established in 1975 that "serves legislators and staffs of nation's 50 states, its commonwealths and territories."[1] organization is headquartered in Washington, D.C. and Denver, Colo. NCSL monitors, tracks and researches state and state-federal legislation that impacts state politics. NCSL also has a nonprofit 501(c)(3) foundation, NCSL Foundation for State Legislatures. It's "composed of sitting state legislators" from the states, territories and commonwealths of the United States. The mission of the Conference is to advance the effectiveness, independence and integrity of legislatures and to foster interstate cooperation . . . especially in support of state sovereignty and state flexibility and protection from unfunded federal mandates and unwarranted federal preemption. The conference promotes cooperation between state legislatures in the U.S. and those in other countries. . . . [and] is committed to improving the operations and management of state legislatures, and the effectiveness of legislators and legislative staff. NCSL also encourages the practice of high standards of conduct by legislators and legislative staff. NCSL maintains two offices: one in Denver, Colorado, and the other in Washington, D.C. Eight Standing Committees, composed of legislators and legislative staff appointed by the leadership of the legislatures, serve as the central organizing mechanism for NCSL members. Each Committee provides a means by which state legislators can share experience, information, and advice on a variety of state issues ranging from policy to management. Committees meet together twice each year at the NCSL Capitol Forum and NCSL's Legislative Summit to adopt state-federal legislative policies that will ultimately guide NCSL's lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C. These committee meetings also serve as an opportunity for states to network and establish flows of information as well as experience-based suggestions from other states. In addition to the NCSL Capitol Forum and the Legislative Summit, NCSL builds the state legislative community by hosting various web seminars, leadership meetings, and access to relevant websites and online documents throughout the year. Issues spanning multiple committee jurisdictions are tackled by NCSL's Task Forces. Unlike the permanent Standing Committees, Task Forces are created for a specific period time and aim to develop positions on highly complex and controversial issues such as immigration reform and welfare. Task Forces are composed of 20 to 30 legislators and legislative staff who are appointed by the NCSL president or staff chair. Day-to-day operations of the organization are in the hands of its Executive Director, Tim Storey. The organization is led by a legislator who serves as its president and by a legislative staffer who serves as staff chair. Twenty years after its founding, NCSL was led in 1994 by its first female president, former Congresswoman Karen McCarthy. Its first African-American president, Rep. Dan Blue, served in 1998–99. The 2019–20 president of NCSL is Representative Robin Vos of Wisconsin, and the staff chair is Martha Wigton of Georgia. Each year, NCSL's presidency alternates between legislators of the Republican and Democratic parties. The NCSL is considered part of the 'Big Seven', a group of organizations that represent local and state government in the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), established in 1975, is a "nonpartisan public officials’ association composed of sitting state legislators" from the states, territories and commonwealths of the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), established in 1975, is run by Robin Vos, possibly the greatest leader of the cannabis prohibition movement, and best ever friend of his divorce attorney, also this - "nonpartisan public officials’ association composed of sitting state legislators" from the states, territories and commonwealths of the United States. (en)
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  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) is a bipartisan non-governmental organization (NGO) established in 1975 to serve the members and staff of state legislatures of the United States (states, commonwealths, and territories). NCSL has three objectives: to improve the quality and effectiveness of state legislatures; to promote policy innovation and communication among state legislatures; and to ensure state legislatures a strong, cohesive voice in the federal system. All state legislators and staff members are automatically members of NCSL. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) is a bipartisan non-governmental organization (NGO) established in 1975 to serve the members and staff of state legislatures of the United States (states, territories and commonwealths of the U.S.). Its mission is to advance the effectiveness, independence and integrity of legislatures and to foster interstate cooperation and facilitate the exchange of information among legislatures. NCSL also represents legislatures in dealing with the federal government, especially in support of state sovereignty and state flexibility and protection from unfunded federal mandates and unwarranted federal preemption. The conference promotes cooperation between state legislatures in the U.S. and those in other countries. In addition, NCSL is committed to (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), established in 1975, is a "nonpartisan public officials’ association composed of sitting state legislators" from the states, territories and commonwealths of the United States. According to their website, the mission of the Conference is NCSL maintains two offices: one in Denver, Colorado, and the other in Washington, D.C. The NCSL is considered part of the 'Big Seven', a group of organizations that represent local and state government in the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), established in 1975, is a bipartisan organization established in 1975 that "serves legislators and staffs of nation's 50 states, its commonwealths and territories."[1] organization is headquartered in Washington, D.C. and Denver, Colo. NCSL monitors, tracks and researches state and state-federal legislation that impacts state politics. NCSL also has a nonprofit 501(c)(3) foundation, NCSL Foundation for State Legislatures. It's "composed of sitting state legislators" from the states, territories and commonwealths of the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), established in 1975, is a "nonpartisan public officials’ association composed of sitting state legislators" from the states, territories and commonwealths of the United States. (en)
  • The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), established in 1975, is run by Robin Vos, possibly the greatest leader of the cannabis prohibition movement, and best ever friend of his divorce attorney, also this - "nonpartisan public officials’ association composed of sitting state legislators" from the states, territories and commonwealths of the United States. (en)
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  • National Conference of State Legislatures (en)
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