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  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions. They revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. Initially, French power rose quickly as the armies of Napoleon conquered much of Europe. In his military career, Napoleon fought about 60 battles and lost seven, mostly at the end of his reign. The great French dominion collapsed rapidly after the disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to Saint Helena.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. The first two coalitions were defeated during the French Revolutionary Wars, while the third (at Austerlitz), the fourth (at Jena, Eylau, and Friedland) and the fifth coalition (at Wagram) were fought under the leadership of Napoleon. These victories gave Napoleon's Grande Armée a sense of invulnerability, especially when it approached Moscow and occupied it after the Russians abandoned it. After the retreat from Russia, the French forces were defeated by the sixth coalition at Leipzig and in France itself, and by the seventh coalition at Waterloo. Following Napoleon's final defeat, the Allies then reversed all French gains outside its 1789 borders at the Congress of Vienna.The wars resulted in the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and sowed the seeds of nationalism that led to the consolidations of Germany and Italy later in the century. The global Spanish Empire began to unravel as French occupation of Spain weakened Spain's hold over its colonies, providing an opening for nationalist revolutions in Spanish America. As a result of the Napoleonic wars and the losses of the other great powers, the British Empire became the foremost world power for the next century, thus beginning Pax Britannica.Scholars disagree about when the French Revolutionary Wars ended and the Napoleonic Wars began. Bonaparte's coup seizing power in France was on 9 November 1799, and 18 May 1803 was when renewed war broke out between Britain and France, ending the year-old period of general peace following the Treaty of Amiens. Most fighting ceased following Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815, although skirmishing continued as late as 3 July 1815 at the Battle of Issy. The Treaty of Paris ended the wars on 20 November 1815. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions. They revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. Initially, French power rose quickly as the armies of Napoleon conquered much of Europe. In his military career, Napoleon fought about 60 battles and lost seven, mostly at the end of his reign. The great French dominion collapsed rapidly after the disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to Saint Helena.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. The first two coalitions were defeated during the French Revolutionary Wars, while the third (at Austerlitz), the fourth (at Jena, Eylau, and Friedland) and the fifth coalition (at Wagram) were fought under the leadership of Napoleon. These victories gave Napoleon's Grande Armée a sense of invulnerability, especially when it approached Moscow and occupied it after the Russians abandoned it. After the retreat from Russia, the French forces were defeated by Russian winter weather and by the sixth coalition at Leipzig and in France itself, and by the seventh coalition at Waterloo. Following Napoleon's final defeat, the Allies then reversed all French gains outside its 1789 borders at the Congress of Vienna.The wars resulted in the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and sowed the seeds of nationalism that led to the consolidations of Germany and Italy later in the century. The global Spanish Empire began to unravel as French occupation of Spain weakened Spain's hold over its colonies, providing an opening for nationalist revolutions in Spanish America. As a result of the Napoleonic wars and the losses of the other great powers, the British Empire became the foremost world power for the next century, thus beginning Pax Britannica.Scholars disagree about when the French Revolutionary Wars ended and the Napoleonic Wars began. Bonaparte's coup seizing power in France was on 9 November 1799, and 18 May 1803 was when renewed war broke out between Britain and France, ending the year-old period of general peace following the Treaty of Amiens. Most fighting ceased following Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815, although skirmishing continued as late as 3 July 1815 at the Battle of Issy. The Treaty of Paris ended the wars on 20 November 1815. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily and consistently led by the United Kingdom. They revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. Initially, French power rose quickly as the armies of Napoleon conquered much of Europe. In his military career, Napoleon fought about 60 battles and lost seven, mostly at the end of his reign. The great French dominion collapsed rapidly after the disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to Saint Helena.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. The first two coalitions were defeated during the French Revolutionary Wars, while the third (at Austerlitz), the fourth (at Jena, Eylau, and Friedland) and the fifth coalition (at Wagram) were fought under the leadership of Napoleon. These victories gave Napoleon's Grande Armée a sense of invulnerability, especially when it approached Moscow and occupied it after the Russians abandoned it. After the retreat from Russia, the French forces were defeated by Russian winter weather and by the sixth coalition at Leipzig and in France itself, and by the seventh coalition at Waterloo. Following Napoleon's final defeat, the Allies then reversed all French gains outside its 1789 borders at the Congress of Vienna.The wars resulted in the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and sowed the seeds of nationalism that led to the consolidations of Germany and Italy later in the century. The global Spanish Empire began to unravel as French occupation of Spain weakened Spain's hold over its colonies, providing an opening for nationalist revolutions in Spanish America. As a result of the Napoleonic wars and the losses of the other great powers, the British Empire became the foremost world power for the next century, thus beginning Pax Britannica.Scholars disagree about when the French Revolutionary Wars ended and the Napoleonic Wars began. Bonaparte's coup seizing power in France was on 9 November 1799, and 18 May 1803 was when renewed war broke out between Britain and France, ending the year-old period of general peace following the Treaty of Amiens. Most fighting ceased following Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815, although skirmishing continued as late as 3 July 1815 at the Battle of Issy. The Treaty of Paris ended the wars on 20 November 1815. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, led and financed by the Great Britain. The wars revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. Initially, French power rose quickly as the armies of Napoleon conquered much of Europe. In his military career, Napoleon fought about 60 battles and lost seven, mostly at the end of his reign. The great French dominion collapsed rapidly after the disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power for 100 days in 1815, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to a remote island.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. The first two coalitions were defeated during the French Revolutionary Wars, while the third (at Austerlitz), the fourth (at Jena, Eylau, and Friedland) and the fifth coalition (at Wagram) were fought under the leadership of Napoleon. These victories gave Napoleon's Grande Armée a sense of invulnerability, especially when it approached Moscow and occupied it after the Russians abandoned it. After the retreat from Russia, the French forces were defeated by Russian winter weather and by the sixth coalition at Leipzig and in France itself, and by the seventh coalition at Waterloo. Following Napoleon's final defeat, the Allies then reversed all French gains outside its 1789 borders at the Congress of Vienna.The wars resulted in the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and sowed the seeds of nationalism that led to the consolidations of Germany and Italy later in the century. The global Spanish Empire began to unravel as French occupation of Spain weakened Spain's hold over its colonies, providing an opening for nationalist revolutions in Spanish America. As a result of the Napoleonic wars and the losses of the other great powers, the British Empire became the foremost world power for the next century, thus beginning Pax Britannica.Scholars disagree about when the French Revolutionary Wars ended and the Napoleonic Wars began. Bonaparte's coup seizing power in France was on 9 November 1799, and 18 May 1803 was when renewed war broke out between Britain and France, ending the year-old period of general peace following the Treaty of Amiens. Most fighting ceased following Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815, although skirmishing continued as late as 3 July 1815 at the Battle of Issy. The Treaty of Paris ended the wars on 20 November 1815. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, led and financed by Great Britain. The wars revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. Initially, French power rose quickly as the armies of Napoleon conquered much of Europe. In his military career, Napoleon fought about 60 battles and lost seven, mostly at the end of his reign. The great French dominion collapsed rapidly after the disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power for 100 days in 1815, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to a remote island.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. The first two coalitions were defeated during the French Revolutionary Wars, while the third (at Austerlitz), the fourth (at Jena, Eylau, and Friedland) and the fifth coalition (at Wagram) were fought under the leadership of Napoleon. These victories gave Napoleon's Grande Armée a sense of invulnerability, especially when it approached Moscow and occupied it after the Russians abandoned it. After the retreat from Russia, the French forces were defeated by Russian winter weather and by the sixth coalition at Leipzig and in France itself, and by the seventh coalition at Waterloo. Following Napoleon's final defeat, the Allies then reversed all French gains outside its 1789 borders at the Congress of Vienna.The wars resulted in the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and sowed the seeds of nationalism that led to the consolidations of Germany and Italy later in the century. The global Spanish Empire began to unravel as French occupation of Spain weakened Spain's hold over its colonies, providing an opening for nationalist revolutions in Spanish America. As a result of the Napoleonic wars and the losses of the other great powers, the British Empire became the foremost world power for the next century, thus beginning Pax Britannica.Scholars disagree about when the French Revolutionary Wars ended and the Napoleonic Wars began. Bonaparte's coup seizing power in France was on 9 November 1799, and 18 May 1803 was when renewed war broke out between Britain and France, ending the year-old period of general peace following the Treaty of Amiens. Most fighting ceased following Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815, although skirmishing continued as late as 3 July 1815 at the Battle of Issy. The Treaty of Paris ended the wars on 20 November 1815. (en)
  • Napoleonic Wars hayden was napoleons friend (en)
  • Napoleonic Wars sorry boss not available (en)
  • Napoleon was french and a jew (en)
  • Napoleonic Wars lifes to short to live jew (en)
  • Napoleonic Wars of Russia in 1812]]. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power for 100 days in 1815, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to a remote island.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. The first two coalitions were defeated during the French Revolutionary Wars, while the third (at Austerlitz), the fourth (at Jena, Eylau, and Friedland) and the fifth coalition (at Wagram) were fought under the leadership of Napoleon. These victories gave Napoleon's Grande Armée a sense of invulnerability, especially when it approached Moscow and occupied it after the Russians abandoned it. After the retreat from Russia, the French forces were defeated by Russian winter weather and by the sixth coalition at Leipzig and in France itself, and by the seventh coalition at Waterloo. Following Napoleon's final defeat, the Allies then reversed all French gains outside its 1789 borders at the Congress of Vienna.The wars resulted in the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and sowed thhe war ended when General Napoleon Bonaparte forced the Austrians to accept his terms in the Treaty of Campo Formio. Only Great Britain remained opposed to the French Republic.The Second Coalition was formed in 1798 by Austria, Great Britain, the Kingdom of Naples, and no longer had the services of Lazare Carnot, the war minister who had guided it to successive victories following extensive reforms during the early 1790s. Bonaparte, the main architect of victory in the last years of the First Coalition, had gone to campaign in Egypt. Missing two of its most important military figures from the previous conflict, the Republic suffered successive defeats against revitalised enemies whom British financial support brought back into the war. Bonaparte returned from Egypt to France on 23 August 1799, and seized control of the French government on 9 November 1799 in the coup of 18 Brumaire replacing the Directory with the Consulate. He reorganised the French military and created a reserve army positioned to support campaigns either on the Rhine or in Italy.On all fronts, French advances caught the Austrians off guard and knocked Russia out of the war. In Italy, Bonaparte won a victory against the AustrFTGWERTUYGFTYRFGWUYESGYUWERHGYUEWRGHUYQERGHEUYRQGHQEIRUGHWRTKEHGJEIRTBGTJRGIUEWRTHGIJWEHians at Marengo in 1800. Following a decisive French victory at Hohenlinden later that year, the Treaty of Lunéville (9 February 1801) formalised Austria's defeat and forced Britain to sign the Treaty of Amiens with France. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, led and financed by Great Britain. The wars revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. Initially, French power rose quickly as the armies of Napoleon conquered much of Europe. In his military career, Napoleon fought about 60 battles and lost seven, mostly at the end of his reign. The great French dominion collapsed rapidly after the disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power for 100 days in 1815, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to the remote island of Saint Helena.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. The first two coalitions were defeated during the French Revolutionary Wars, while the third (at Austerlitz), the fourth (at Jena, Eylau, and Friedland) and the fifth coalition (at Wagram) were fought under the leadership of Napoleon. These victories gave Napoleon's Grande Armée a sense of invulnerability, especially when it approached Moscow and occupied it after the Russians abandoned it. After the retreat from Russia, the French forces were defeated by Russian winter weather and by the sixth coalition at Leipzig and in France itself, and by the seventh coalition at Waterloo. Following Napoleon's final defeat, the Allies then reversed all French gains outside its 1789 borders at the Congress of Vienna.The wars resulted in the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and sowed the seeds of nationalism that led to the consolidations of Germany and Italy later in the century. The global Spanish Empire began to unravel as French occupation of Spain weakened Spain's hold over its colonies, providing an opening for nationalist revolutions in Spanish America. As a result of the Napoleonic wars and the losses of the other great powers, the British Empire became the foremost world power for the next century, thus beginning Pax Britannica.Scholars disagree about when the French Revolutionary Wars ended and the Napoleonic Wars began. Bonaparte's coup seizing power in France was on 9 November 1799, and 18 May 1803 was when renewed war broke out between Britain and France, ending the year-old period of general peace following the Treaty of Amiens. Most fighting ceased following Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815, although skirmishing continued as late as 3 July 1815 at the Battle of Issy. The Treaty of Paris ended the wars on 20 November 1815. (en)
  • Template:Use Mexican EnglishThe Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, led and financed by Great Britain. The wars revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. Initially, French power rose quickly as the armies of Napoleon conquered much of Europe. In his military career, Napoleon fought about 60 battles and lost seven, mostly at the end of his reign. The great French dominion collapsed rapidly after the disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power for 100 days in 1815, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to the remote island of Saint Helena.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. The first two coalitions were defeated during the French Revolutionary Wars, while the third (at Austerlitz), the fourth (at Jena, Eylau, and Friedland) and the fifth coalition (at Wagram) were fought under the leadership of Napoleon. These victories gave Napoleon's Grande Armée a sense of invulnerability, especially when it approached Moscow and occupied it after the Russians abandoned it. After the retreat from Russia, the French forces were defeated by Russian winter weather and by the sixth coalition at Leipzig and in France itself, and by the seventh coalition at Waterloo. Following Napoleon's final defeat, the Allies then reversed all French gains outside its 1789 borders at the Congress of Vienna.The wars resulted in the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and sowed the seeds of nationalism that led to the consolidations of Germany and Italy later in the century. The global Spanish Empire began to unravel as French occupation of Spain weakened Spain's hold over its colonies, providing an opening for nationalist revolutions in Spanish America. As a result of the Napoleonic wars and the losses of the other great powers, the British Empire became the foremost world power for the next century, thus beginning Pax Britannica.Scholars disagree about when the French Revolutionary Wars ended and the Napoleonic Wars began. Bonaparte's coup seizing power in France was on 9 November 1799, and 18 May 1803 was when renewed war broke out between Britain and France, ending the year-old period of general peace following the Treaty of Amiens. Most fighting ceased following Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815, although skirmishing continued as late as 3 July 1815 at the Battle of Issy. The Treaty of Paris ended the wars on 20 November 1815. (en)
  • {{Infobox military conflict |conflict=Napoleonic Wars |image= |caption=Top: Battle of AusterlitzBottom: Battle of Waterloo |date= 18 May 1803 – 20 November 1815(12 years, 6 months and 2 days) |place=Europe, Americas, Africa, Asia | |result= Overall Coalition victoryCongress of ViennaFall of the French Republic and the First French EmpireExile of Napoleon I to St. HelenaRestoration of the Bourbon monarchyDissolution of the Holy Roman EmpireRise of the British Empire as the dominant world powerRise of the Kingdom of Prussia as a great powerDecline of the Spanish EmpireDecline of the Portuguese EmpireWidespread rise of nationalism and liberalism|territory=see Congress of Vienna|combatant1=| |combatant2=French Empire and allies: French Republic First French EmpireThe Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, led and financed by Great Britain. The wars revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. Initially, French power rose quickly as the armies of Napoleon conquered much of Europe. In his military career, Napoleon fought about 60 battles and lost seven, mostly at the end of his reign. The great French dominion collapsed rapidly after the disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power for 100 days in 1815, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to the remote island of Saint Helena.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. The first two coalitions were defeated during the French Revolutionary Wars, while the third (at Austerlitz), the fourth (at Jena, Eylau, and Friedland) and the fifth coalition (at Wagram) were fought under the leadership of Napoleon. These victories gave Napoleon's Grande Armée a sense of invulnerability, especially when it approached Moscow and occupied it after the Russians abandoned it. After the retreat from Russia, the French forces were defeated by Russian winter weather and by the sixth coalition at Leipzig and in France itself, and by the seventh coalition at Waterloo. Following Napoleon's final defeat, the Allies then reversed all French gains outside its 1789 borders at the Congress of Vienna.The wars resulted in the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and sowed the seeds of nationalism that led to the consolidations of Germany and Italy later in the century. The global Spanish Empire began to unravel as French occupation of Spain weakened Spain's hold over its colonies, providing an opening for nationalist revolutions in Spanish America. As a result of the Napoleonic wars and the losses of the other great powers, the British Empire became the foremost world power for the next century, thus beginning Pax Britannica.Scholars disagree about when the French Revolutionary Wars ended and the Napoleonic Wars began. Bonaparte's coup seizing power in France was on 9 November 1799, and 18 May 1803 was when renewed war broke out between Britain and France, ending the year-old period of general peace following the Treaty of Amiens. Most fighting ceased following Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815, although skirmishing continued as late as 3 July 1815 at the Battle of Issy. The Treaty of Paris ended the wars on 20 November 1815. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the British Empire. The wars broke out as a general continuation of the French Revolutionary Wars, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power over the French government in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though a commonly used start-date is 18 May 1803, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources and naval dominance. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the British blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league. The British later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its blockade. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire to withdraw from the war, and formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition against France. The resumption of war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was knocked out of the war within 19 days of Napoleon beginning his campaign. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a coalition effort against France. The French army occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the tenuous alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed. A British effort on the continent to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon later took command of the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System led to Napoleon invading Russia with the bulk of his pan-European forces. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victorious powers began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent Britain emerged as the most important economic power, and its Royal Navy held unquestioned naval superiority across the globe well into the 20th century. , while the British Empire became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire had been formally dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American colonial possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire also began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822. The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort. The French Army had redefined the role of artillery, creating independent, highly mobile units, while Napoleon's emphasis on mobility was exploited to offset numerical disadvantages. Aerial surveillance was used for the first time, when the French used a hot air balloon to observe enemy positions in 1794. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent populist revolutions, such as the Russian Revolution, looked to the French as their source of inspiration , while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the British Empire. The wars broke out as a general continuation of the French Revolutionary Wars, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power over the French government in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though a commonly used start-date is 18 May 1803, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources and naval dominance. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the British blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league. The British later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its blockade. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire to withdraw from the war, and formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition against France. The resumption of war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was knocked out of the war within 19 days of Napoleon beginning his campaign. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a coalition effort against France. The French army occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the tenuous alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed. A British effort on the continent to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon later took command of the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System led to Napoleon invading Russia with the bulk of his pan-European forces. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victorious powers began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent Britain emerged as the most important economic power, and its Royal Navy held unquestioned naval superiority across the globe well into the 20th century. , while the British Empire became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire had been formally dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American colonial possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire also began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822. The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort; the French Army had redefined the role of artillery Napoleon emphasised mobility to offset numerical disadvantages. Aerial surveillance was used for the first time, when the French used a hot air balloon to observe enemy positions in 1794. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent populist revolutions, such as the Russian Revolution, looked to the French as their source of inspiration , while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the British Empire. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though 18 May 1803 is often used, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league, and later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its strategy. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire out of the war, formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition. This war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was defeated and occupied within 19 days of the campaign's beginning. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Concurrently, Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a new coalition effort against France. The French occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed, while a British effort to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon oversaw the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland, and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System, led to Napoleon invading Russia. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat with massive losses. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821. The Treaty of Paris, signed on 20 November 1815, formally ended the war.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victors began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent, while the British Empire became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822. The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort; the French Army had redefined the role of artillery, while Napoleon emphasised mobility to offset numerical disadvantages. Aerial surveillance was used for the first time, when the French used a hot air balloon to observe enemy positions in 1794. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by fervent nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent revolutions, such as that of Russia, looked to the French as their source of inspiration , while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies in use today. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by Great Britain. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though 18 May 1803 is often used, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league, and later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its strategy. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire out of the war, formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition. This war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was defeated and occupied within 19 days of the campaign's beginning. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Concurrently, Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a new coalition effort against France. The French occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed, while a British effort to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon oversaw the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland, and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System, led to Napoleon invading Russia. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat with massive losses. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821. The Treaty of Paris, signed on 20 November 1815, formally ended the war.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victors began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent, while Great Britain became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822. The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort; the French Army had redefined the role of artillery, while Napoleon emphasised mobility to offset numerical disadvantages. Aerial surveillance was used for the first time, when the French used a hot air balloon to observe enemy positions in 1794. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by fervent nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent revolutions, such as that of Russia, looked to the French as their source of inspiration , while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies in use today. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the British Empire. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though 18 May 1803 is often used, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league, and later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its strategy. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire out of the war, formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition. This war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was defeated and occupied within 19 days of the campaign's beginning. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Concurrently, Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a new coalition effort against France. The French occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed, while a British effort to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon oversaw the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland, and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System, led to Napoleon invading Russia. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat with massive losses. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821. The Treaty of Paris, signed on 20 November 1815, formally ended the war.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victors began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent, while Great Britain became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822. The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort; the French Army had redefined the role of artillery, while Napoleon emphasised mobility to offset numerical disadvantages. Aerial surveillance was used for the first time, when the French used a hot air balloon to observe enemy positions in 1794. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by fervent nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent revolutions, such as that of Russia, looked to the French as their source of inspiration , while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies in use today. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the United Kingdom. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though 18 May 1803 is often used, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league, and later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its strategy. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire out of the war, formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition. This war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was defeated and occupied within 19 days of the campaign's beginning. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Concurrently, Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a new coalition effort against France. The French occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed, while a British effort to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon oversaw the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland, and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System, led to Napoleon invading Russia. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat with massive losses. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821. The Treaty of Paris, signed on 20 November 1815, formally ended the war.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victors began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent, while Great Britain became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822. The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort; the French Army had redefined the role of artillery, while Napoleon emphasised mobility to offset numerical disadvantages. Aerial surveillance was used for the first time, when the French used a hot air balloon to observe enemy positions in 1794. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by fervent nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent revolutions, such as that of Russia, looked to the French as their source of inspiration , while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies in use today. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the United Kingdom. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though 18 May 1803 is often used, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league, and later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its strategy. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire out of the war, formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition. This war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was defeated and occupied within 19 days of the campaign's beginning. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Concurrently, Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a new coalition effort against France. The French occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed, while a British effort to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon oversaw the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland, and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System, led to Napoleon invading Russia. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat with massive losses. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821. The Treaty of Paris, signed on 20 November 1815, formally ended the war.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victors began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent, while the United Kingdom became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822. The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort; the French Army had redefined the role of artillery, while Napoleon emphasised mobility to offset numerical disadvantages. Aerial surveillance was used for the first time, when the French used a hot air balloon to observe enemy positions in 1794. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by fervent nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent revolutions, such as that of Russia, looked to the French as their source of inspiration , while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies in use today. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the United Kingdom. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though 18 May 1803 is often used, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league, and later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its strategy. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire out of the war, formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition. This war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was defeated and occupied within 19 days of the campaign's beginning. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Concurrently, Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a new coalition effort against France. The French occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed, while a British effort to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon oversaw the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland, and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System, led to Napoleon invading Russia. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat with massive losses. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821. The Treaty of Paris, signed on 20 November 1815, formally ended the war.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victors began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent, while the United Kingdom became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822. The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort. Tactically, the French Army redefined the role of artillery, while Napoleon emphasised mobility to offset numerical disadvantages, and Aerial surveillance was used for the first time in warfare. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by fervent nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent revolutions, such as that of Russia, looked to the French as their source of inspiration , while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies in use today. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the United Kingdom. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though 18 May 1803 is often used, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league, and later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its strategy. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire out of the war, formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition. This war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was defeated and occupied within 19 days of the campaign's beginning. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Concurrently, Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a new coalition effort against France. The French occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed, while a British effort to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon oversaw the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland, and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System, led to Napoleon invading Russia. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat with massive losses. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821. The Treaty of Paris, signed on 20 November 1815, formally ended the war.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victors began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent, while the United Kingdom became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822. The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort. Tactically, the French Army redefined the role of artillery, while Napoleon emphasised mobility to offset numerical disadvantages, and aerial surveillance was used for the first time in warfare. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by fervent nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent revolutions, such as that of Russia, looked to the French as their source of inspiration , while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies in use today. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the United Kingdom. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. No consensus exists on when the wars began, though 18 May 1803 is often used, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814.The British quickly enforced a naval blockade of France to starve it of resources. Napoleon responded with economic embargoes against Britain, and sought to eliminate Britain's Continental allies to break the coalitions arrayed against him. The so-called Continental System formed a league of armed neutrality to disrupt the blockade and enforce free trade with France. The British responded by capturing the Danish fleet, breaking up the league, and later secured dominance over the seas, allowing it to freely continue its strategy. Napoleon defeated the third coalition at Austerlitz, forcing the Austrian Empire out of the war, formally dissolving the Holy Roman Empire. Within months, Prussia declared war, triggering a fourth coalition. This war ended disastrously for the coalition; Prussia was defeated and occupied within 19 days of the campaign's beginning. Napoleon subsequently defeated the Russian Empire at Friedland, creating powerful client states in Eastern Europe, ending the fourth coalition.Concurrently, Portugal's refusal to commit to the Continental System, and Spain's failure to maintain it, led to the Peninsular War, and the outbreak of a new coalition effort against France. The French occupied Spain and formed a Spanish client kingdom, ending the alliance between the two. Heavy British involvement in the Peninsular soon followed, while a British effort to capture Antwerp failed. Napoleon oversaw the situation in Iberia, defeating the Spanish, and expelling the British from the Peninsular. Austria, keen to recover territory lost during the third coalition, invaded France's client states in Eastern Europe. Napoleon defeated the fifth coalition at Wagram.Attempts to disrupt the British blockade led to the United States declaring war on Britain, while grievances over control of Poland, and Russia's withdrawal from the Continental System, led to Napoleon invading Russia. The invasion was an unmitigated disaster for Napoleon; scorched earth tactics, desertion, French strategic failures and the onset of the Russian winter compelled Napoleon to retreat with massive losses. Napoleon suffered further setbacks; French power in the Iberian Peninsular was broken at Vitoria the following summer, while a new coalition declared war on France.The coalition defeated Napoleon at Leipzig, precipitating his fall from power and eventual abdication on April 6, 1814. The victors exiled Napoleon to Elba and restored the Bourbon monarchy. Napoleon escaped from Elba in 1815, gathering enough support to overthrow the monarchy of Louis XVIII, triggering a seventh, and final, coalition against him. Napoleon was decisively defeated at Waterloo, and he abdicated again on 22 June. On 15 July, he surrendered to the British at Rochefort, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821. The Treaty of Paris, signed on 20 November 1815, formally ended the war.The Bourbon monarchy was restored once more, and the victors began the Congress of Vienna, to restore peace to the continent. As a direct result of the war, the Kingdom of Prussia rose to become a great power on the continent, while the United Kingdom became the world's dominant superpower, beginning the Pax Britannica. The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, and the philosophy of nationalism, that emerged early in the war, greatly contributed to the later unification of the German states, and those of the Italian peninsular. The war in Iberia greatly weakened Spanish power, and the Spanish Empire began to unravel; Spain would lose nearly all of its American possessions by 1833. The Portuguese Empire began a rapid decline, with Brazil declaring independence in 1822.The wars revolutionised European warfare; the application of mass conscription and total war led to campaigns of unprecedented scale, as whole nations committed all their economic and industrial resources to a collective war effort. Tactically, the French Army redefined the role of artillery, while Napoleon emphasised mobility to offset numerical disadvantages, and aerial surveillance was used for the first time in warfare. While not a new tactic, the highly successful Spanish guerrillas demonstrated the capability of a people driven by fervent nationalism, liberalism and religious fundamentalism against an occupying force. Due to the longevity of the wars, and the extent of Napoleon's conquests, the ideals of the French Revolution had a massive impact on European social culture; many subsequent revolutions, such as that of Russia, looked to the French as their source of inspiration, while its core founding tenets greatly expanded the arena of Human rights and shaped modern political philosophies in use today. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by Great Britain. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the United Kingdom. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792.They used to eat their own children and this is vandalism (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) was a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by Great Britain. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon; the Third Coalition (1805), the Fourth (1806–7), Fifth (1809), Sixth (1813), and the Seventh and final (1815).Napoleon, upon ascending to First Consul of France in 1799, had inherited a chaotic republic; he subsequently created a state with stable finances, a strong bureaucracy, and a well-trained army. In 1805, Austria and Russia waged war against France. In response, Napoleon defeated the allied Russo-Austrian army at Austerlitz in December 1805, which is considered his greatest victory. At sea, the British inflicted a severe defeat in October 1805 upon the joint Franco-Spanish navy, securing British control of the seas and preventing the invasion of Britain itself. Prussian concerns about increasing French power led to a resumption of war in October 1806. Napoleon quickly defeated the Prussians, and defeated Russia in June 1807, bringing an uneasy peace to the continent. The peace failed; war broke out two years later in 1809, and this coalition was soon defeated.Hoping to isolate Britain economically, Napoleon invaded Iberia, declaring his brother Joseph king of Spain in 1808. The Spanish and Portuguese revolted with British support, and, after six years of fighting, expelled the French from Iberia in 1814. Concurrently, Russia, unwilling to bear economic consequences of reduced trade, routinely violated the Continental System, enticing Napoleon to launch a massive invasion of Russia in 1812. The resulting campaign ended with the dissolution and withdrawal of the Grande Armée. Encouraged by the defeat, Prussia, Austria, and Russia began a new campaign against France, decisively defeating Napoleon at Leipzig in October 1813 after several inconclusive engagements. The Allies then invaded France, capturing Paris at the end of March 1814 and forcing Napoleon to abdicate in early April. He was exiled to the island of Elba, and the Bourbons were restored to power. However, Napoleon escaped in February 1815, and reassumed control of France. The Allies responded with the Seventh Coalition, defeating Napoleon permanently at Waterloo in June 1815 and exiling him to St Helena.The Congress of Vienna redrew the borders of Europe, and brought a lasting peace to the continent. The wars had profound consequences on global history; it fostered the spread of nationalism and liberalism, saw the rise of the British Empire as the world's foremost power, independence movements in Latin America and the subsequent collapse of the Spanish Empire, the fundamental reorganisation of German and Italian territories into larger states, and the establishment of radically new methods of conducting warfare. (en)
dbo:causalties
  • Spanish: more than 300,000 military deaths — more than 586,000 killed
  • British: 32,232 killed in action
  • Italians: 120,000 killed or missing
  • British 279,574 killed by wounds, disease, accidents and other causes
dbo:combatant
  • ----
  • First French Empire
  • French Republic
  • Hanover
  • Nassau
  • Persian Empire
  • '''
  • Russian Empire
  • Württemberg
  • Great Britain
  • Spanish Empire
  • (1804–1807, 1810–1815)
  • (1804–1809, 1812–1815)
  • (1805, 1809, 1813–1815)
  • (1806–1810)
  • (1807–1809, 1810–1812)
  • (1807–1810)
  • (1807–1812)
  • (1809–1812)
  • (1809–1813)
  • Bavaria
  • Denmark–Norway(1807–1814)
  • French Royalists
  • Montenegro( (1806–1814)
  • Persia(1804–1807, 1812–1813)
  • Persia(1807–1812)
  • Portugal(1800–1807, 1809–1815)
  • Spain(1803–1808)
  • Spain(1808–1815)
  • Tuscany
  • Denmark–Norway
  • Austrian Empire
  • Sardinia
  • Saxony
  • Hungary
  • Portuguese Empire
  • United Netherlands
  • (1807–1814)
  • Montenegro
  • (1810–1812)
  • (1804–1807, 1812–1815)
  • (1806–1809)
  • (1813–1815)
  • Bavaria(1813–1815)
  • Montenegro( (1806-1807,1813–1814)
  • Württemberg(1813–1815)
  • ( (1806-1807,1813–1814)
  • (1803–1808)
  • (1804–1807, 1812–1813)
  • (1808–1815)
  • (1800–1807, 1809–1815)
  • 19px
  • French Empire and allies:
  • Coalition powers:
dbo:commander
dbo:date
  • 1803-05-18 (xsd:date)
  • 1815-11-20 (xsd:date)
dbo:place
dbo:result
  • : French victory;Treaty of Schönbrunn
  • *Treaty of Schönbrunn
  • Congress of Vienna
  • : French victory;Treaty of SchönbrunnWRETVWEGRUFWERFUGVQHRGUH
  • * Exile ofNapoleon ItoSt. Helena
  • * Widespread rise ofnationalismandliberalism
  • *Restoration of the Bourbon monarchy
  • Overall Coalition victory
  • * Rise ofPrussiaas a great power
  • * Fall of theFirst French Empire
  • * Rise of theBritish Empireas thedominant world superpower
  • *Decline of the SpanishandPortugueseempires
  • * Dissolution of theHoly Roman EmpireandDenmark-Norway, establishment of theUnited Kingdoms of Sweden and Norway
dbo:strength
  • 3,000,000 French under arms in total
  • 750,000 British under arms in total
  • 680,000 French and allied regulars at peak strength
  • 320,000 Prussian regulars and militia at peak strength
  • 900,000 Russian regulars, cossacks and militia at peak strength
  • 250,000 British regulars and militia at peak strength
  • 1,200,000 French regulars and militia at peak strength
dbo:territory
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2017-08-07 01:48:36Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 45420 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 136386 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2017-08-06 12:58:47Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 634 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 794191891 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:caption
  • Bottom: Battle of Waterloo (en)
  • Top: Battle of Austerlitz (en)
dbp:casualties
  • 65000 (xsd:integer)
  • 371000 (xsd:integer)
  • 600000 (xsd:integer)
  • 800000 (xsd:integer)
  • ---- (en)
  • -see full list (en)
  • Total: 1,400,000 (en)
  • Total: 2,000,000 (en)
  • (120,000 Italians killed or missing) (en)
  • (15,000 Americans killed) (en)
  • (32,232 British killed in action) (en)
  • (371,000 killed in action) (en)
  • (600,000 civilians killed) (en)
  • (65,000 French allies killed) (en)
  • (279,574 British killed by wounds, disease, accidents and other causes) (en)
  • (800,000 killed by disease, wounds, accidents and other causes) (en)
  • (586,000 Spanish killed) (en)
  • Spanish: more than 300,000 military deaths — more than 586,000 killed (en)
  • British: 32,232 killed in action (en)
  • Italians: 120,000 killed or missing (en)
  • British 279,574 killed by wounds, disease, accidents and other causes (en)
dbp:combatant
dbp:commander
dbp:conflict
  • Napoleonic Wars (en)
dbp:date
  • --05-18
  • February 2013 (en)
dbp:failed
  • y (en)
dbp:place
dbp:result
  • ; Third Coalition : French victory; Treaty of Pressburg ; Fourth Coalition : French victory; Treaties of Tilsit ; Peninsular War : Coalition victory; ; Fifth Coalition : French victory; Treaty of Schönbrunn ; French Invasion of Russia : Russian victory ; Sixth Coalition : Coalition victory; First Treaty of Paris ; Seventh Coalition : Coalition victory; Second Treaty of Paris (en)
  • ; Third Coalition : French victory; Treaty of Pressburg ; Fourth Coalition : French victory; Treaties of Tilsit ; Peninsular War : Coalition victory; ; Fifth Coalition : French victory; Treaty of Schönbrunn ; French Invasion of Russia : French tactical victory, Russian strategic victory ; Sixth Coalition : Coalition victory; First Treaty of Paris ; Seventh Coalition : Coalition victory; Second Treaty of Paris (en)
  • ; Third Coalition : French victory; Treaty of Pressburg ; Fourth Coalition : French victory; Treaties of Tilsit ; Peninsular War : Coalition victory; ; Fifth CoalitionASDRFTGYHGFDESDRCFVGBHNBGVFDRAWSTGYHUBGYVFCTDS4WA3QWSDTCFVYGBUHNBUGVYFCDSAQ2asdfvgybuvfdsaq : French victory; Treaty of SchönbrunnWRETVWEGRUFWERFUGVQHRGUH ; French Invasion of Russia : French tactical victory, Russian strategic victory ; Sixth Coalition : Coalition victory; First Treaty of Paris ; Seventh Coalition : Coalition victory; Second Treaty of Paris (en)
  • ; Third Coalition * French victory * Treaty of Pressburg ; Fourth Coalition * French victory * Treaties of Tilsit ; Peninsular War * Allied victory * Treaty of Paris ; Fifth Coalition * French victory * Treaty of Schönbrunn ; French Invasion of Russia * Russian victory ; Sixth Coalition * Coalition victory * Treaty of Paris ; Seventh Coalition * Coalition victory * Second Treaty of Paris (en)
  • ; Third Coalition * French victory * Treaty of Pressburg ; Fourth Coalition * French victory * Treaties of Tilsit ; Peninsular War * Coalition victory * Treaty of Paris ; Fifth Coalition * French victory * Treaty of Schönbrunn ; French Invasion of Russia * Russian victory ; Sixth Coalition * Coalition victory * Treaty of Paris ; Seventh Coalition * Coalition victory * Second Treaty of Paris (en)
  • Overall Coalition victory: * Fall of the French Republic and the First French Empire * Exile of Napoleon I to St. Helena * Restoration of the Bourbon monarchy * Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire * Rise of the British Empire as the dominant world power * Rise of the Kingdom of Prussia as a great power * Decline of the Spanish Empire * Decline of the Portuguese Empire * Widespread rise of nationalism and liberalism (en)
  • Overall Coalition victory: * Fall of the First French Republic and the First French Empire * Exile of Napoleon I to St. Helena * Restoration of the Bourbon monarchy * Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire * Rise of the British Empire as the dominant world power * Rise of the Kingdom of Prussia as a great power * Decline of the Spanish Empire * Decline of the Portuguese Empire * Widespread rise of nationalism and liberalism (en)
  • Overall Coalition victory (en)
  • Congress of Vienna: * Fall of the French Republic and the First French Empire * Exile of Napoleon I to St. Helena * Restoration of the Bourbon monarchy * Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire * Rise of the British Empire as the dominant world power * Rise of the Kingdom of Prussia as a great power * Decline of the Spanish Empire * Decline of the Portuguese Empire * Widespread rise of nationalism and liberalism (en)
  • Congress of Vienna * Fall of the French Republic and the First French Empire * Exile of Napoleon I to St. Helena * Restoration of the Bourbon monarchy * Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire * Rise of the British Empire as the dominant world power * Rise of the Kingdom of Prussia as a great power * Decline of the Spanish Empire * Decline of the Portuguese Empire * Widespread rise of nationalism and liberalism (en)
  • Congress of Vienna * Fall of the French Republic and the First French Empire * Exile of Napoleon I to St. Helena * Restoration of the Bourbon monarchy * Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire * Rise of the British Empire as the dominant world power * Rise of the Kingdom of Prussia as a great power * Decline of the Spanish Empire * Decline of the Portuguese Empire * Widespread rise of nationalism and liberalism (en)
  • Congress of Vienna * Fall of the French Republic and the First French Empire * Exile of Napoleon I to St. Helena * Restoration of the Bourbon monarchy * Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire * Rise of the British Empire as the dominant world superpower * Rise of the Kingdom of Prussia as a great power * Decline of the Spanish Empire * Decline of the Portuguese Empire * Widespread rise of nationalism and liberalism (en)
  • Congress of Vienna * Fall of the First French Empire * Exile of Napoleon I to St. Helena * Restoration of the Bourbon monarchy * Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and Denmark-Norway, establishment of the United Kingdoms of Sweden and Norway * Rise of the British Empire as the dominant world superpower * Rise of Prussia as a great power * Decline of the Spanish and Portuguese empires * Widespread rise of nationalism and liberalism (en)
dbp:strength
  • 250000 (xsd:integer)
  • 320000 (xsd:integer)
  • 680000 (xsd:integer)
  • 750000 (xsd:integer)
  • 900000 (xsd:integer)
  • 1200000 (xsd:integer)
  • 3000000 (xsd:integer)
  • Total: 11,000,000 (en)
dbp:territory
  • see Congress of Vienna (en)
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbp:wordnet_type
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions. They revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily and consistently led by the United Kingdom. They revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, led and financed by the Great Britain. The wars revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, led and financed by Great Britain. The wars revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. The wars were a continuation of the Revolutionary Wars, which broke out in 1792 during the French Revolution. (en)
  • Napoleonic Wars hayden was napoleons friend (en)
  • Napoleonic Wars sorry boss not available (en)
  • Napoleon was french and a jew (en)
  • Napoleonic Wars lifes to short to live jew (en)
  • Napoleonic Wars of Russia in 1812]]. Napoleon was defeated in 1814, and sent into exile on the island of Elba; he then escaped and returned to power for 100 days in 1815, only to be defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and was exiled again, this time to a remote island.During the successive conflicts, also known as the Coalition Wars, France defeated five consecutive coalitions arrayed against it, before suffering defeat against the sixth and seventh. (en)
  • Template:Use Mexican EnglishThe Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire, led by Napoleon I, against an array of European powers formed into various coalitions, led and financed by Great Britain. The wars revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. (en)
  • {{Infobox military conflict |conflict=Napoleonic Wars |image= |caption=Top: Battle of AusterlitzBottom: Battle of Waterloo |date= 18 May 1803 – 20 November 1815(12 years, 6 months and 2 days) |place=Europe, Americas, Africa, Asia | |result= Overall Coalition victoryCongress of ViennaFall of the French Republic and the First French EmpireExile of Napoleon I to St. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the British Empire. The wars broke out as a general continuation of the French Revolutionary Wars, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the British Empire. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by Great Britain. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its client states, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the United Kingdom. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. Napoleon had seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by Great Britain. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792. (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a series of major conflicts, pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the United Kingdom. War broke out as a continuation of the French Revolution, which had plunged the European continent into war since 1792.They used to eat their own children and this is vandalism (en)
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) was a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by Great Britain. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and its resultant conflict. (en)
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