Militant, commonly called the Militant tendency, was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper that launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and 'virtually nobody else'.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Militant, commonly called the Militant tendency, was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper that launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and 'virtually nobody else'. In 1975, there was widespread press coverage of a Labour Party report on the infiltration tactics of Militant. Between 1975 and 1980, attempts by Reg Underhill and others in the leadership of the Labour Party to expel Militant were rejected by its National Executive Committee, which appointed a Militant member to the position of National Youth Organiser in 1976 after Militant had won control of the party's youth section, the Labour Party Young Socialists. After the Liverpool Labour Party adopted Militant's strategy to set an illegal deficit budget in 1982, a Labour Party commission found Militant in contravention of clause II, section 3 of the party's constitution which made political groups with their own "Programme, Principles and Policy for separate and distinctive propaganda" ineligible for affiliation. Militant was proscribed by the Labour Party's National Executive Committee in December 1982 and the following year five members of the Editorial Board of the Militant newspaper were expelled from the Labour Party. At this point, the group claimed to have 4,300 members. Further expulsions of Militant activists followed. Militant policies dominated Liverpool City Council between 1983 and 1987 and the council organised mass opposition to government cuts to the rate support grant. Forty-seven councillors were banned and surcharged. The conduct of the Liverpool council led Neil Kinnock, Labour's leader, to denounce Militant at the 1985 Party Conference. Eventually, Militant's two remaining Labour MPs were prevented from being Labour candidates at the 1992 general election. Between 1989 and 1991, Militant led the All-Britain Anti-Poll Tax Federation's non-payment campaign against the poll tax. In 1991, Militant decided by a large majority to abandon entryism in the Labour Party. Ted Grant, once the group's most important member, was expelled and his breakaway minority, now known as Socialist Appeal, continued with the entryist strategy. The majority changed its name to Militant Labour and then in 1997 to the Socialist Party. (en)
  • Militant, commonly called the Militant tendency, was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper that launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". In 1975, there was widespread press coverage of a Labour Party report on the infiltration tactics of Militant. Between 1975 and 1980, attempts by Reg Underhill and others in the leadership of the Labour Party to expel Militant were rejected by its National Executive Committee, which appointed a Militant member to the position of National Youth Organiser in 1976 after Militant had won control of the party's youth section, the Labour Party Young Socialists. After the Liverpool Labour Party adopted Militant's strategy to set an illegal deficit budget in 1982, a Labour Party commission found Militant in contravention of clause II, section 3 of the party's constitution which made political groups with their own "Programme, Principles and Policy for separate and distinctive propaganda" ineligible for affiliation. Militant was proscribed by the Labour Party's National Executive Committee in December 1982 and the following year five members of the Editorial Board of the Militant newspaper were expelled from the Labour Party. At this point, the group claimed to have 4,300 members. Further expulsions of Militant activists followed. Militant policies dominated Liverpool City Council between 1983 and 1987 and the council organised mass opposition to government cuts to the rate support grant. Forty-seven councillors were banned and surcharged. The conduct of the Liverpool council led Neil Kinnock, Labour's leader, to denounce Militant at the 1985 Party Conference. Eventually, Militant's two remaining Labour MPs were prevented from being Labour candidates at the 1992 general election. Between 1989 and 1991, Militant led the All-Britain Anti-Poll Tax Federation's non-payment campaign against the poll tax. In 1991, Militant decided by a large majority to abandon entryism in the Labour Party. Ted Grant, once the group's most important member, was expelled and his breakaway minority, now known as Socialist Appeal, continued with the entryist strategy. The majority changed its name to Militant Labour and then in 1997 to the Socialist Party. (en)
  • Militant (Welsh: Milwriaethus), (commonly called the Militant tendency), was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper that launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". In 1975, there was widespread press coverage of a Labour Party report on the infiltration tactics of Militant. Between 1975 and 1980, attempts by Reg Underhill and others in the leadership of the Labour Party to expel Militant were rejected by its National Executive Committee, which appointed a Militant member to the position of National Youth Organiser in 1976 after Militant had won control of the party's youth section, the Labour Party Young Socialists. After the Liverpool Labour Party adopted Militant's strategy to set an illegal deficit budget in 1982, a Labour Party commission found Militant in contravention of clause II, section 3 of the party's constitution which made political groups with their own "Programme, Principles and Policy for separate and distinctive propaganda" ineligible for affiliation. Militant was proscribed by the Labour Party's National Executive Committee in December 1982 and the following year five members of the Editorial Board of the Militant newspaper were expelled from the Labour Party. At this point, the group claimed to have 4,300 members. Further expulsions of Militant activists followed. Militant policies dominated Liverpool City Council between 1983 and 1987 and the council organised mass opposition to government cuts to the rate support grant. Forty-seven councillors were banned and surcharged. The conduct of the Liverpool council led Neil Kinnock, Labour's leader, to denounce Militant at the 1985 Party Conference. Eventually, Militant's two remaining Labour MPs were prevented from being Labour candidates at the 1992 general election. Between 1989 and 1991, Militant led the All-Britain Anti-Poll Tax Federation's non-payment campaign against the poll tax. In 1991, Militant decided by a large majority to abandon entryism in the Labour Party. Ted Grant, once the group's most important member, was expelled and his breakaway minority, now known as Socialist Appeal, continued with the entryist strategy. The majority changed its name to Militant Labour and then in 1997 to the Socialist Party. (en)
  • Militant (Welsh: Milwriaethus) (commonly called the Militant tendency) was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper that launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". In 1975, there was widespread press coverage of a Labour Party report on the infiltration tactics of Militant. Between 1975 and 1980, attempts by Reg Underhill and others in the leadership of the Labour Party to expel Militant were rejected by its National Executive Committee, which appointed a Militant member to the position of National Youth Organiser in 1976 after Militant had won control of the party's youth section, the Labour Party Young Socialists. After the Liverpool Labour Party adopted Militant's strategy to set an illegal deficit budget in 1982, a Labour Party commission found Militant in contravention of clause II, section 3 of the party's constitution which made political groups with their own "Programme, Principles and Policy for separate and distinctive propaganda" ineligible for affiliation. Militant was proscribed by the Labour Party's National Executive Committee in December 1982 and the following year five members of the Editorial Board of the Militant newspaper were expelled from the Labour Party. At this point, the group claimed to have 4,300 members. Further expulsions of Militant activists followed. Militant policies dominated Liverpool City Council between 1983 and 1987 and the council organised mass opposition to government cuts to the rate support grant. Forty-seven councillors were banned and surcharged. The conduct of the Liverpool council led Neil Kinnock, Labour's leader, to denounce Militant at the 1985 Party Conference. Eventually, Militant's two remaining Labour MPs were prevented from being Labour candidates at the 1992 general election. Between 1989 and 1991, Militant led the All-Britain Anti-Poll Tax Federation's non-payment campaign against the poll tax. In 1991, Militant decided by a large majority to abandon entryism in the Labour Party. Ted Grant, once the group's most important member, was expelled and his breakaway minority, now known as Socialist Appeal, continued with the entryist strategy. The majority changed its name to Militant Labour and then in 1997 to the Socialist Party. (en)
  • Militant (Welsh: Milwriaethus) (commonly called the Militant tendency) was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper, which launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". In 1975, there was widespread press coverage of a Labour Party report on the infiltration tactics of Militant. Between 1975 and 1980, attempts by Reg Underhill and others in the leadership of the Labour Party to expel Militant were rejected by its National Executive Committee, which appointed a Militant member to the position of National Youth Organiser in 1976 after Militant had won control of the party's youth section, the Labour Party Young Socialists. After the Liverpool Labour Party adopted Militant's strategy to set an illegal deficit budget in 1982, a Labour Party commission found Militant in contravention of clause II, section 3 of the party's constitution which made political groups with their own "Programme, Principles and Policy for separate and distinctive propaganda" ineligible for affiliation. Militant was proscribed by the Labour Party's National Executive Committee in December 1982 and the following year five members of the Editorial Board of the Militant newspaper were expelled from the Labour Party. At this point, the group claimed to have 4,300 members. Further expulsions of Militant activists followed. Militant policies dominated Liverpool City Council between 1983 and 1987 and the council organised mass opposition to government cuts to the rate support grant. Forty-seven councillors were banned and surcharged. The conduct of the Liverpool council led Neil Kinnock, Labour's leader, to denounce Militant at the 1985 Party Conference. Eventually, Militant's two remaining Labour MPs were prevented from being Labour candidates at the 1992 general election. Between 1989 and 1991, Militant led the All-Britain Anti-Poll Tax Federation's non-payment campaign against the poll tax. In 1991, Militant decided by a large majority to abandon entryism in the Labour Party. Ted Grant, once the group's most important member, was expelled and his breakaway minority, now known as Socialist Appeal, continued with the entryist strategy. The majority changed its name to Militant Labour and then in 1997 to the Socialist Party. (en)
  • Militant was a Trotskyist entryist group in the British Labour Party, organised around the Militant newspaper, which launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". In 1975, there was widespread press coverage of a Labour Party report on the infiltration tactics of Militant. Between 1975 and 1980, attempts by Reg Underhill and others in the leadership of the Labour Party to expel Militant were rejected by its National Executive Committee, which appointed a Militant member to the position of National Youth Organiser in 1976 after Militant had won control of the party's youth section, the Labour Party Young Socialists. After the Liverpool Labour Party adopted Militant's strategy to set an illegal deficit budget in 1982, a Labour Party commission found Militant in contravention of clause II, section 3 of the party's constitution which made political groups with their own "Programme, Principles and Policy for separate and distinctive propaganda" ineligible for affiliation. Militant was proscribed by the Labour Party's National Executive Committee in December 1982 and the following year five members of the Editorial Board of the Militant newspaper were expelled from the Labour Party. At this point, the group claimed to have 4,300 members. Further expulsions of Militant activists followed. Militant policies dominated Liverpool City Council between 1983 and 1987 and the council organised mass opposition to government cuts to the rate support grant. Forty-seven councillors were banned and surcharged. The conduct of the Liverpool council led Neil Kinnock, Labour's leader, to denounce Militant at the 1985 Party Conference. Eventually, Militant's two remaining Labour MPs were prevented from being Labour candidates at the 1992 general election. Between 1989 and 1991, Militant led the All-Britain Anti-Poll Tax Federation's non-payment campaign against the poll tax. In 1991, Militant decided by a large majority to abandon entryism in the Labour Party. Ted Grant, once the group's most important member, was expelled and his breakaway minority, now known as Socialist Appeal, continued with the entryist strategy. The majority changed its name to Militant Labour and then in 1997 to the Socialist Party. (en)
  • Militant was a Trotskyist group in the British Labour Party, organised around the Militant newspaper, which launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". In 1975, there was widespread press coverage of a Labour Party report on the infiltration tactics of Militant. Between 1975 and 1980, attempts by Reg Underhill and others in the leadership of the Labour Party to expel Militant were rejected by its National Executive Committee, which appointed a Militant member to the position of National Youth Organiser in 1976 after Militant had won control of the party's youth section, the Labour Party Young Socialists. After the Liverpool Labour Party adopted Militant's strategy to set an illegal deficit budget in 1982, a Labour Party commission found Militant in contravention of clause II, section 3 of the party's constitution which made political groups with their own "Programme, Principles and Policy for separate and distinctive propaganda" ineligible for affiliation. Militant was proscribed by the Labour Party's National Executive Committee in December 1982 and the following year five members of the Editorial Board of the Militant newspaper were expelled from the Labour Party. At this point, the group claimed to have 4,300 members. Further expulsions of Militant activists followed. Militant policies dominated Liverpool City Council between 1983 and 1987 and the council organised mass opposition to government cuts to the rate support grant. Forty-seven councillors were banned and surcharged. The conduct of the Liverpool council led Neil Kinnock, Labour's leader, to denounce Militant at the 1985 Party Conference. Eventually, Militant's two remaining Labour MPs were prevented from being Labour candidates at the 1992 general election. Between 1989 and 1991, Militant led the All-Britain Anti-Poll Tax Federation's non-payment campaign against the poll tax. In 1991, Militant decided by a large majority to abandon entryism in the Labour Party. Ted Grant, once the group's most important member, was expelled and his breakaway minority, now known as Socialist Appeal, continued with the entryist strategy. The majority changed its name to Militant Labour and then in 1997 to the Socialist Party. (en)
  • | youth_wing = Labour Party Young Socialists (controlled) | ideology = * Marxism * Revolutionary socialism * Trotskyism | position = Far-left| national = Labour Party(entryist group)| colours = Red| website = militant.org.uk| country = United Kingdom}}Militant was a Trotskyist group in the British Labour Party, organised around the Militant newspaper, which launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". In 1975, there was widespread press coverage of a Labour Party report on the infiltration tactics of Militant. Between 1975 and 1980, attempts by Reg Underhill and others in the leadership of the Labour Party to expel Militant were rejected by its National Executive Committee, which appointed a Militant member to the position of National Youth Organiser in 1976 after Militant had won control of the party's youth section, the Labour Party Young Socialists. After the Liverpool Labour Party adopted Militant's strategy to set an illegal deficit budget in 1982, a Labour Party commission found Militant in contravention of clause II, section 3 of the party's constitution which made political groups with their own "Programme, Principles and Policy for separate and distinctive propaganda" ineligible for affiliation. Militant was proscribed by the Labour Party's National Executive Committee in December 1982 and the following year five members of the Editorial Board of the Militant newspaper were expelled from the Labour Party. At this point, the group claimed to have 4,300 members. Further expulsions of Militant activists followed. Militant policies dominated Liverpool City Council between 1983 and 1987 and the council organised mass opposition to government cuts to the rate support grant. Forty-seven councillors were banned and surcharged. The conduct of the Liverpool council led Neil Kinnock, Labour's leader, to denounce Militant at the 1985 Party Conference. Eventually, Militant's two remaining Labour MPs were prevented from being Labour candidates at the 1992 general election. Between 1989 and 1991, Militant led the All-Britain Anti-Poll Tax Federation's non-payment campaign against the poll tax. In 1991, Militant decided by a large majority to abandon entryism in the Labour Party. Ted Grant, once the group's most important member, was expelled and his breakaway minority, now known as Socialist Appeal, continued with the entryist strategy. The majority changed its name to Militant Labour and then in 1997 to the Socialist Party. (en)
dbo:colour
dbo:colourName
  • Red (en)
dbo:dissolutionYear
  • 1991-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbo:formationYear
  • 1964-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbo:leader
dbo:nationalAffiliation
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-02-15 21:31:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 20:41:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-29 10:56:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-29 11:01:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-29 11:04:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-29 11:06:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-06 19:18:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-06 19:19:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-10 08:37:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-17 08:40:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-19 21:59:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-20 04:08:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-07 05:50:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-07 05:56:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-07 05:57:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-10 22:19:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-10 22:39:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-13 06:53:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-09 12:29:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:05:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:32:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:34:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:35:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:36:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:40:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:42:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:42:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:50:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:57:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:58:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 05:37:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-14 16:43:37Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 42034901 (xsd:integer)
  • 65313626 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 78 (xsd:integer)
  • 60888 (xsd:integer)
  • 61334 (xsd:integer)
  • 61337 (xsd:integer)
  • 61340 (xsd:integer)
  • 61344 (xsd:integer)
  • 61349 (xsd:integer)
  • 61351 (xsd:integer)
  • 61356 (xsd:integer)
  • 61362 (xsd:integer)
  • 61364 (xsd:integer)
  • 61372 (xsd:integer)
  • 61373 (xsd:integer)
  • 61393 (xsd:integer)
  • 61400 (xsd:integer)
  • 61404 (xsd:integer)
  • 61453 (xsd:integer)
  • 61492 (xsd:integer)
  • 61494 (xsd:integer)
  • 61496 (xsd:integer)
  • 61500 (xsd:integer)
  • 61506 (xsd:integer)
  • 61521 (xsd:integer)
  • 61584 (xsd:integer)
  • 61586 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-02-15 21:31:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 20:41:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-29 10:56:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-29 11:01:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-29 11:04:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-29 11:06:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-06 19:18:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-06 19:19:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-10 08:36:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-17 08:40:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-19 21:59:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-20 04:08:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-07 05:50:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-07 05:56:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-07 05:56:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-10 22:19:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-10 22:39:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-13 06:53:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-09 12:29:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:05:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:32:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:34:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:35:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:36:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:40:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:41:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:42:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:50:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:57:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 04:58:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-13 05:37:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-14 16:43:23Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 1 (xsd:integer)
  • 145 (xsd:integer)
  • 146 (xsd:integer)
  • 147 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 940980425 (xsd:integer)
  • 954128751 (xsd:integer)
  • 959558603 (xsd:integer)
  • 959559201 (xsd:integer)
  • 959559588 (xsd:integer)
  • 959559818 (xsd:integer)
  • 961128736 (xsd:integer)
  • 961128888 (xsd:integer)
  • 961764349 (xsd:integer)
  • 963013310 (xsd:integer)
  • 963453887 (xsd:integer)
  • 963503365 (xsd:integer)
  • 966450233 (xsd:integer)
  • 966450773 (xsd:integer)
  • 966450816 (xsd:integer)
  • 972224392 (xsd:integer)
  • 972226764 (xsd:integer)
  • 972659180 (xsd:integer)
  • 977537501 (xsd:integer)
  • 978139332 (xsd:integer)
  • 978142376 (xsd:integer)
  • 978142507 (xsd:integer)
  • 978142676 (xsd:integer)
  • 978142789 (xsd:integer)
  • 978143220 (xsd:integer)
  • 978143349 (xsd:integer)
  • 978143441 (xsd:integer)
  • 978144237 (xsd:integer)
  • 978144993 (xsd:integer)
  • 978145058 (xsd:integer)
  • 978148633 (xsd:integer)
  • 978389091 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbo:youthWing
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Militant, commonly called the Militant tendency, was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper that launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and 'virtually nobody else'. (en)
  • Militant, commonly called the Militant tendency, was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper that launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". (en)
  • Militant (Welsh: Milwriaethus), (commonly called the Militant tendency), was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper that launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". (en)
  • Militant (Welsh: Milwriaethus) (commonly called the Militant tendency) was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper that launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". (en)
  • Militant (Welsh: Milwriaethus) (commonly called the Militant tendency) was a Trotskyist entryist group designed to infiltrate the British Labour Party. Its voice was the Militant newspaper, which launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". (en)
  • Militant was a Trotskyist entryist group in the British Labour Party, organised around the Militant newspaper, which launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". (en)
  • Militant was a Trotskyist group in the British Labour Party, organised around the Militant newspaper, which launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". (en)
  • | youth_wing = Labour Party Young Socialists (controlled) | ideology = * Marxism * Revolutionary socialism * Trotskyism | position = Far-left| national = Labour Party(entryist group)| colours = Red| website = militant.org.uk| country = United Kingdom}}Militant was a Trotskyist group in the British Labour Party, organised around the Militant newspaper, which launched in 1964. According to Michael Crick, its politics were based on the thoughts of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and "virtually nobody else". (en)
rdfs:label
  • Militant (Trotskyist group) (en)
owl:differentFrom
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:homepage
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Militant (en)
  • Milwriaethus (cy)
is dbo:splitFromParty of
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is owl:differentFrom of
is foaf:primaryTopic of