A log jam is an accumulation of large wood (commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long also commonly called large woody debris) that can span an entire stream or river channel.

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  • A log jam is an accumulation of large wood (commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long also commonly called large woody debris) that can span an entire stream or river channel. Historically in North America, large "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. (en)
  • A log jam is an accumulation of large wood (commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long also commonly called large woody debris) that can span an entire stream or river channel. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. (en)
  • A log jam is an accumulation of large wood (commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) that can span an entire stream or river channel. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by the dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood accross a vast section of a river or stream. (Large wood is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams often span the entirety of the water’s surface from bank to bank. Logs jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. Until they are dismantled by natural causes or humans, log jams grow exponentially as more wood arriving from upstream becomes entangled in the mass. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. Log jams are not to be confused with man-made timber rafts created by loggers, or the intentional release of large masses of trees into the water during a log drive to a sawmill. (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by the dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood accross a vast section of a river or stream. (Large wood is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams often span the entirety of the water’s surface from bank to bank. Logs jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. Until they are dismantled by natural causes or humans, log jams grow exponentially as more wood arriving from upstream becomes entangled in the mass. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. Log jams are not to be confused with man-made timber rafts created by loggers or the intentional release of large masses of trees into the water during a log drive to a sawmill. (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by a dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood accross a vast section of a river, stream, or lake. ("Large wood" is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams in rivers and streams often span the entirety of the water’s surface from bank to bank. Logs jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. They can build up slowly over months or years, or they can happen instantaneously when large numbers of trees are swept into the water after natural disasters such as mudslides; a notable example is the log jam that occurred in Spirit Lake following the eruption of Mount Saint Helens. Until they are dismantled by natural causes or humans, log jams can grow exponentially as more wood arriving from upstream becomes entangled in the mass. Log jams can persist for many decades, as is the case with the log jam in Spirit Lake. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. Log jams are not to be confused with man-made timber rafts created by loggers or the intentional release of large masses of trees into the water during a log drive to a sawmill. (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by a dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood accross a vast section of a river, stream, or lake. ("Large wood" is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams in rivers and streams often span the entirety of the water’s surface from bank to bank. Logs jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. They can build up slowly over months or years, or they can happen instantaneously when large numbers of trees are swept into the water after natural disasters. A notable example caused by a natural disaster is the log jam that occurred in Spirit Lake following a landslide triggered by the eruption of Mount Saint Helens. Until they are dismantled by natural causes or humans, log jams can grow exponentially as more wood arriving from upstream becomes entangled in the mass. Log jams can persist for many decades, as is the case with the log jam in Spirit Lake. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. Log jams are not to be confused with man-made timber rafts created by loggers or the intentional release of large masses of trees into the water during a log drive to a sawmill. (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by a dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood accross a vast section of a river, stream, or lake. ("Large wood" is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams in rivers and streams often span the entirety of the water’s surface from bank to bank. Log jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. They can build up slowly over months or years, or they can happen instantaneously when large numbers of trees are swept into the water after natural disasters. A notable example caused by a natural disaster is the log jam that occurred in Spirit Lake following a landslide triggered by the eruption of Mount Saint Helens. Until they are dismantled by natural causes or humans, log jams can grow exponentially as more wood arriving from upstream becomes entangled in the mass. Log jams can persist for many decades, as is the case with the log jam in Spirit Lake. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. Log jams are not to be confused with man-made timber rafts created by loggers or the intentional release of large masses of trees into the water during a log drive to a sawmill. (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by a dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood across a vast section of a river, stream, or lake. ("Large wood" is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams in rivers and streams often span the entirety of the water's surface from bank to bank. Log jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. They can build up slowly over months or years, or they can happen instantaneously when large numbers of trees are swept into the water after natural disasters. A notable example caused by a natural disaster is the log jam that occurred in Spirit Lake following a landslide triggered by the eruption of Mount Saint Helens. Until they are dismantled by natural causes or humans, log jams can grow exponentially as more wood arriving from upstream becomes entangled in the mass. Log jams can persist for many decades, as is the case with the log jam in Spirit Lake. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. Log jams are not to be confused with man-made timber rafts created by loggers or the intentional release of large masses of trees into the water during a log drive to a sawmill. (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by a dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood across a vast section of a river, stream, or lake. ("Large wood" is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams in rivers and streams often span the entirety of the water's surface from bank to bank. Log jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. They can build up slowly over months or years, or they can happen instantaneously when large numbers of trees are swept into the water after natural disasters. A notable example caused by a natural disaster is the log jam that occurred in Spirit Lake following a landslide triggered by the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Until they are dismantled by natural causes or humans, log jams can grow exponentially as more wood arriving from upstream becomes entangled in the mass. Log jams can persist for many decades, as is the case with the log jam in Spirit Lake. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. Log jams are not to be confused with man-made timber rafts created by loggers or the intentional release of large masses of trees into the water during a log drive to a sawmill. (en)
  • Затор из брёвен - это естественное явление, характеризующееся плотным скоплением стволов деревьев и кусков крупной древесины на обширном участке реки, ручья или озера. («Крупная древесина"» обычно определяется как куски дерева диаметром более 10 см (4 дюйма) и длиной более 1 м (3 фута 3 дюйма)) Заторы в реках и ручьях часто охватывают всю территорию поверхности воды от берега к берегу. Затор из брёвен образуются, когда деревья, плавающие в воде, сцепляются с другими деревьями, плавающими в воде, или зацепляются за камни, большой древесный мусор и другие объекты, расположенные под водой. Они могут нарастать медленно в течение месяцев или лет или могут возникать мгновенно, когда большое количество деревьев смывается в воду после стихийных бедствий. Ярким примером стихийного бедствия является застревание брёвен в озере Спирит после оползня, вызванного извержением вулкана Сент-Хеленс. До тех пор, пока они не будут демонтированы естественными причинами или людьми, заторы из брёвен могут расти в геометрической прогрессии, поскольку всё больше древесины, поступающей из верхнего течения, запутывается в массе. Застревание брёвен может сохраняться в течение многих десятилетий, как в случае застревания бревен в озере Спирит. Исторически сложилось так, что в Северной Америке большие естественные «плоты из брёвен» были обычным явлением по всему континенту до заселения европейцев. Самый известный плот из натурального дерева - Большой плот on the Красной реке в Луизиане, который до своего удаления в 1830-х годах затронул между 390 и 480 км (240–300 миль) главного канала. Было высказано предположение, что такие обширные бревенчатые плоты могли быть обычным явлением в Европе в доисторические времена. Не следует путать заторы брёвен с искусственными деревянными плотами, созданными лесорубами, или преднамеренным выбросом больших масс деревьев в воду во время перевозки брёвен на лесопилку. (en)
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  • A log jam is an accumulation of large wood (commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long also commonly called large woody debris) that can span an entire stream or river channel. (en)
  • A log jam is an accumulation of large wood (commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) that can span an entire stream or river channel. Historically in North America, large natural "log rafts" were common across the continent prior to European settlement. The most famous natural wood raft is the Great Raft on the Red River in Louisiana, which prior to its removal in the 1830s affected between 390 and 480 km (240–300 mi) of the main channel. It has been suggested that such extensive log rafts may have been common in Europe in prehistory. (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by the dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood accross a vast section of a river or stream. (Large wood is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams often span the entirety of the water’s surface from bank to bank. Logs jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. Until they are dismantled by natural causes or humans, log jams grow exponentially as more wood arriving from upstream becomes entangled in the mass. (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by a dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood accross a vast section of a river, stream, or lake. ("Large wood" is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams in rivers and streams often span the entirety of the water’s surface from bank to bank. Logs jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. They can build up slowly over months or years, or they can happen instantaneously when large numbers of trees are swept into the water after natural disasters such as mudslides; a notable example is the log jam th (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by a dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood accross a vast section of a river, stream, or lake. ("Large wood" is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams in rivers and streams often span the entirety of the water’s surface from bank to bank. Logs jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. They can build up slowly over months or years, or they can happen instantaneously when large numbers of trees are swept into the water after natural disasters. A notable example caused by a natural disaster is the (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by a dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood accross a vast section of a river, stream, or lake. ("Large wood" is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams in rivers and streams often span the entirety of the water’s surface from bank to bank. Log jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. They can build up slowly over months or years, or they can happen instantaneously when large numbers of trees are swept into the water after natural disasters. A notable example caused by a natural disaster is the (en)
  • A log jam is a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by a dense accumulation of tree trunks and pieces of large wood across a vast section of a river, stream, or lake. ("Large wood" is commonly defined as pieces of wood more than 10 cm (4 in) in diameter and more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long) Log jams in rivers and streams often span the entirety of the water's surface from bank to bank. Log jams form when trees floating in the water become entangled with other trees floating in the water, or become snagged on rocks, large woody debris, or other objects anchored underwater. They can build up slowly over months or years, or they can happen instantaneously when large numbers of trees are swept into the water after natural disasters. A notable example caused by a natural disaster is the l (en)
  • Затор из брёвен - это естественное явление, характеризующееся плотным скоплением стволов деревьев и кусков крупной древесины на обширном участке реки, ручья или озера. («Крупная древесина"» обычно определяется как куски дерева диаметром более 10 см (4 дюйма) и длиной более 1 м (3 фута 3 дюйма)) Заторы в реках и ручьях часто охватывают всю территорию поверхности воды от берега к берегу. Затор из брёвен образуются, когда деревья, плавающие в воде, сцепляются с другими деревьями, плавающими в воде, или зацепляются за камни, большой древесный мусор и другие объекты, расположенные под водой. Они могут нарастать медленно в течение месяцев или лет или могут возникать мгновенно, когда большое количество деревьев смывается в воду после стихийных бедствий. Ярким примером стихийного бедствия является (en)
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  • Log jam (en)
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