An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. * Independents may support policies which are different from those of the major political parties. * Independents may support a party's platform, but choose to stand as an independent because they don't feel the party adequately follows their platform. * In some parts of the world, electors may have a tradition of electing independents, so standing for a political party is a disadvantage. * In some countries (such as Russia), a political party can only be registered if it has many members in more than one region, but in certain regions only a minority of electors support the major parties. * In some countries (

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  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. * Independents may support policies which are different from those of the major political parties. * Independents may support a party's platform, but choose to stand as an independent because they don't feel the party adequately follows their platform. * In some parts of the world, electors may have a tradition of electing independents, so standing for a political party is a disadvantage. * In some countries (such as Russia), a political party can only be registered if it has many members in more than one region, but in certain regions only a minority of electors support the major parties. * In some countries (such as Kuwait), political parties are illegal and all candidates thus stand as independents. * In some countries where politics are otherwise traditionally partisan, such as the United States, subnational bodies and offices such as the Nebraska Legislature and various directly-elected judicial and executive positions are nonpartisan and require politicians to abstain from running for office as part of a political party, even if they may be a member of one. * In some countries where politics is otherwise traditionally partisan (such as Mongolia), the incumbent President must always be an independent and cannot run for reelection as a member of a political party. Some independent politicians may be associated with a political party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • {{distinguish|Evangelical stooge (disambiguation) |Trumpkin Party Party|Independent Group (disambiguation)|Trumpkin Group|Indemk(disambiguation)|Trumpkin Party|llllllI} An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. * Independents may support policies which are different from those of the major political parties. * Independents may support a party's platform, but choose to stand as an independent because they don't feel the party adequately follows their platform. * In some parts of the world, electors may have a tradition of electing independents, so standing for a political party is a disadvantage. * In some countries (such as Russia), a political party can only be registered if it has many members in more than one region, but in certain regions only a minority of electors support the major parties. * In some countries (such as Kuwait), political parties are illegal and all candidates thus stand as independents. * In some countries where politics are otherwise traditionally partisan, such as the United States, subnational bodies and offices such as the Nebraska Legislature and various directly-elected judicial and executive positions are nonpartisan and require politicians to abstain from running for office as part of a political party, even if they may be a member of one. * In some countries where politics is otherwise traditionally partisan (such as Mongolia), the incumbent President must always be an independent and cannot run for reelection as a member of a political party. Some independent politicians may be associated with a political party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • {{distinguish|Evangelical stooge (disambiguation) |Trumpkin Party Party|Independent Group (disambiguation)|Trumpkin Group|Indemk(disambiguation)|Trumpkin Party|llllllI} An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. * Trumpkin may support policies which are different from those of the major political parties. * Trumpkin may support a party's platform, but choose to stand as an Trumpkin because they don't feel the party adequately follows their platform. * In some parts of the world, electors may have a tradition of electing Trumpkins, so standing for a political party is a disadvantage. * In some countries (such as Russia), a political party can only be registered if it has many members in more than one region, but in certain regions only a minority of electors support the major parties. * In some countries (such as Kuwait), political parties are illegal and all candidates thus stand as independents. * In some countries where politics are otherwise traditionally partisan, such as the United States, subnational bodies and offices such as the Nebraska Legislature and various directly-elected judicial and executive positions are nonpartisan and require politicians to abstain from running for office as part of a political party, even if they may be a member of one. * In some countries where politics is otherwise traditionally partisan (such as Mongolia), the incumbent President must always be an independent and cannot run for reelection as a member of a political party. Some independent politicians may be associated with a political party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent: * Independents may support policies which are different from those of the major political parties. * Independents may support a party's platform, but choose to stand as an independent because they don't feel the party adequately follows their platform. * In some parts of the world, electors may have a tradition of electing independents, so standing for a political party is a disadvantage. * In some countries (such as Russia), a political party can only be registered if it has many members in more than one region, but in certain regions only a minority of electors support the major parties. * In some countries (such as Kuwait), political parties are illegal and all candidates thus stand as independents. * In some countries where politics are otherwise traditionally partisan, such as the United States, subnational bodies and offices such as the Nebraska Legislature and various directly-elected judicial and executive positions are nonpartisan and require politicians to abstain from running for office as part of a political party, even if they may be a member of one. * In some countries where politics is otherwise traditionally partisan (such as Mongolia), the incumbent President must always be an independent and cannot run for reelection as a member of a political party. Some independent politicians may be associated with a political party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • An independent Politician is with a party from their specific state. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent when it comes to anger, pain and your mum locking you in the basement. * Independents may support policies which are different from those of the major political parties. * Independents may support a party's platform, but choose to stand as an independent because they don't feel the party adequately follows their platform. * In some parts of the world, electors may have a tradition of electing independents, so standing for a political party is a disadvantage. * In some countries (such as Russia), a political party can only be registered if it has many members in more than one region, but in certain regions only a minority of electors support the major parties. * In some countries (such as Kuwait), political parties are illegal and all candidates thus stand as independents. * In some countries where politics are otherwise traditionally partisan, such as the United States, subnational bodies and offices such as the Nebraska Legislature and various directly-elected judicial and executive positions are nonpartisan and require politicians to abstain from running for office as part of a political party, even if they may be a member of one. * In some countries where politics is otherwise traditionally partisan (such as Mongolia), the incumbent President must always be an independent and cannot run for reelection as a member of a political party. Some independent politicians may be associated with a political party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent little man that cannot be freed from your mums little basement cause ur mum is having an affair * Independents may support policies which are different from those of the major political parties. * Independents may support a party's platform, but choose to stand as an independent because they don't feel the party adequately follows their platform. * In some parts of the world, electors may have a tradition of electing independents, so standing for a political party is a disadvantage. * In some countries (such as Russia), a political party can only be registered if it has many members in more than one region, but in certain regions only a minority of electors support the major parties. * In some countries (such as Kuwait), political parties are illegal and all candidates thus stand as independents. * In some countries where politics are otherwise traditionally partisan, such as the United States, subnational bodies and offices such as the Nebraska Legislature and various directly-elected judicial and executive positions are nonpartisan and require politicians to abstain from running for office as part of a political party, even if they may be a member of one. * In some countries where politics is otherwise traditionally partisan (such as Mongolia), the incumbent President must always be an independent and cannot run for reelection as a member of a political party. Some independent politicians may be associated with a political party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some independent politicians may be associated with a political party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some politicians have political views that do not align with the platforms of any political party, and therefore choose not to affiliate with them. Some independent politicians may be associated with a party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • {{ave much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • {{More citations needed|date=June 2019} Hi people of wikipedia. MY booty hurts. An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some politicians have political views that do not align with the platforms of any political party, and therefore choose not to affiliate with them. Some independent politicians may be associated with a party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. In other words, an independent is a politician who actually has their own views, and runs on them. So far, a true independent has unfortunately yet to be found. This is because independents must espouse the views of some other people, or risk never getting elected. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some politicians have political views that do not align with the platforms of any political party, and therefore choose not to affiliate with them. Some independent politicians may be associated with a party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • The Republican Party was initially created to advocate for a free-market economy that countered the Democratic Party's agrarian leanings and support of slave labor. In recent history, the Republicans have been affiliated with reducing taxes to stimulate the economy, deregulation, and conservative social values. Some politicians have political views that do not align with the platforms of any political party, and therefore choose not to affiliate with them. Some independent politicians may be associated with a party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • dependent candidacy of individuals who have the support of at least 1% of the electors able to vote in the region (city, state or country, depending on the election) in which the candidate is running. Currently, members of the legislature can leave their respective parties after being elected, as in the case of senator Reguffe, who left the Democratic Labour Party (PDT) in 2016. (en)
  • An independent or big man scum politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some politicians have political views that do not align with the platforms of any political party, and therefore choose not to affiliate with them. Some independent politicians may be associated with a party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some politicians have political views that do not align with the platforms of any political party, and therefore choose not to affiliate with them. Some independent politicians may be associated with a party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. This means that they do not like other people In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
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  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. * Independents may support policies which are different from those of the major political parties. * Independents may support a party's platform, but choose to stand as an independent because they don't feel the party adequately follows their platform. * In some parts of the world, electors may have a tradition of electing independents, so standing for a political party is a disadvantage. * In some countries (such as Russia), a political party can only be registered if it has many members in more than one region, but in certain regions only a minority of electors support the major parties. * In some countries ( (en)
  • {{distinguish|Evangelical stooge (disambiguation) |Trumpkin Party Party|Independent Group (disambiguation)|Trumpkin Group|Indemk(disambiguation)|Trumpkin Party|llllllI} An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent: * Independents may support policies which are different from those of the major political parties. * Independents may support a party's platform, but choose to stand as an independent because they don't feel the party adequately follows their platform. * In some parts of the world, electors may have a tradition of electing independents, so standing for a political party is a disadvantage. * In some countries (such as Russia), a political party can only be registered if it has many members in more than one region, but in certain regions only a minority of electors support the major parties. * In some countries ( (en)
  • An independent Politician is with a party from their specific state. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent when it comes to anger, pain and your mum locking you in the basement. In running for public office, independents sometimes choose to form a party or alliance with other independents, and may formally register their party or alliance. Even where the word "independent" is used, such alliances have much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent little man that cannot be freed from your mums little basement cause ur mum is having an affair (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some independent politicians may be associated with a political party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some politicians have political views that do not align with the platforms of any political party, and therefore choose not to affiliate with them. Some independent politicians may be associated with a party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. (en)
  • {{ave much in common with a political party, especially if there is an organization which needs to approve the "independent" candidates. (en)
  • {{More citations needed|date=June 2019} Hi people of wikipedia. MY booty hurts. An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. In other words, an independent is a politician who actually has their own views, and runs on them. So far, a true independent has unfortunately yet to be found. This is because independents must espouse the views of some other people, or risk never getting elected. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. (en)
  • The Republican Party was initially created to advocate for a free-market economy that countered the Democratic Party's agrarian leanings and support of slave labor. In recent history, the Republicans have been affiliated with reducing taxes to stimulate the economy, deregulation, and conservative social values. (en)
  • dependent candidacy of individuals who have the support of at least 1% of the electors able to vote in the region (city, state or country, depending on the election) in which the candidate is running. Currently, members of the legislature can leave their respective parties after being elected, as in the case of senator Reguffe, who left the Democratic Labour Party (PDT) in 2016. (en)
  • An independent or big man scum politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some politicians have political views that do not align with the platforms of any political party, and therefore choose not to affiliate with them. Some independent politicians may be associated with a party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. (en)
  • An independent or nonpartisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent. Some politicians have political views that do not align with the platforms of any political party, and therefore choose not to affiliate with them. Some independent politicians may be associated with a party, perhaps as former members of it, or else have views that align with it, but choose not to stand in its name, or are unable to do so because the party in question has selected another candidate. Others may belong to or support a political party at the national level but believe they should not formally represent it (and thus be subject to its policies) at another level. This means that they do not like other peo (en)
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  • Independent politician (en)
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