Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in San Francisco, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers moving into desktop publishing (DTP). Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on other design publications.

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  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in San Francisco, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers moving into desktop publishing (DTP). Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on other design publications. The focus of Emigre was both redundant and wandering—both positive qualities as a journal produced by a tight and evolving group of designers and writers with Vanderlans at the center. Vanderlans was typically editor, though guest-editors also appeared (Gail Swanlund, Anne Burdick, Andrew Blauvelt) and the work/writing of Zuzana Licko and Jeffery Keedy reappeared throughout the magazine's history. The magazine began in 1984 with a focus on the émigré. The first eight issues were concerned with boundaries, international culture, travel accounts and alienation (as the issues' titles suggest). The first eight issues also incorporated a dynamic aesthetic that caught the attention of designers and led to the next stage in the magazine's evolution. Beginning with Issue 9—devoted to the art of Vaughan Oliver at 4AD—the magazine explored design in itself, devoting issues to Cranbrook, the Macintosh, type design and individual graphic designers. In two issues in 1992 and 1993, the magazine chronicled the work of David Carson and Raygun. Increasingly, Emigre became a platform for essays and writings on design. This aspect of Emigre came to the forefront with issues in 1994 and the magazine changed its format in 1995 from its oversized layout to a text-friendlier format that debuted with Issue 33. The magazine retained this character through Issue 59 in 2001. Emigre then took a sharp turn with four re-formatted issues in 2001 and 2002 that included one DVD (Catfish, an experimental documentary film on the work of designer and performance artist Elliott Earls) and three compact discs (featuring the music of Honey Barbara, The Grassy Knoll and Scenic). In its fifth and final incarnation, the last six issues of Emigre were co-published by Princeton Architectural Press as small softcover books. The last issue, The End, was published in 2005. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in Berkeley, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers exploring desktop publishing (DTP). Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on other design publications. The focus of Emigre was both redundant and wandering—both positive qualities as a journal produced by a tight and evolving group of designers and writers with Vanderlans at the center. Vanderlans was typically editor, though guest-editors also appeared (Gail Swanlund, Anne Burdick, Andrew Blauvelt) and the work/writing of Zuzana Licko and Jeffery Keedy reappeared throughout the magazine's history. The magazine began in 1984 with a focus on the émigré. The first eight issues were concerned with boundaries, international culture, travel accounts and alienation (as the issues' titles suggest). The first eight issues also incorporated a dynamic aesthetic that caught the attention of designers and led to the next stage in the magazine's evolution. Beginning with Issue 9—devoted to the art of Vaughan Oliver at 4AD—the magazine explored design in itself, devoting issues to Cranbrook, the Macintosh, type design and individual graphic designers. Increasingly, Emigre became a platform for essays and writings on design. This aspect of Emigre came to the forefront with issues in 1994 and the magazine changed its format in 1995 from its oversized layout to a text-friendlier format that debuted with Issue 33. The magazine retained this character through Issue 59 in 2001. Emigre then took a sharp turn with four re-formatted issues in 2001 and 2002 that included one DVD (Catfish, an experimental documentary film on the work of designer and performance artist Elliott Earls) and three compact discs (featuring the music of Honey Barbara, The Grassy Knoll and Scenic). In its fifth and final incarnation, the last six issues of Emigre were co-published by Princeton Architectural Press as small softcover books. The last issue, The End, was published in 2005. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in Berkeley, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers exploring the new technology. Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on other design publications. The focus of Emigre was both redundant and wandering—both positive qualities as a journal produced by a tight and evolving group of designers and writers with Vanderlans at the center. Vanderlans was typically editor, though guest-editors also appeared (Gail Swanlund, Anne Burdick, Andrew Blauvelt) and the work/writing of Zuzana Licko and Jeffery Keedy reappeared throughout the magazine's history. The magazine began in 1984 with a focus on the émigré. The first eight issues were concerned with boundaries, international culture, travel accounts and alienation (as the issues' titles suggest). The first eight issues also incorporated a dynamic aesthetic that caught the attention of designers and led to the next stage in the magazine's evolution. Beginning with Issue 9—devoted to the art of Vaughan Oliver at 4AD—the magazine explored design in itself, devoting issues to Cranbrook, the Macintosh, type design and individual graphic designers. Increasingly, Emigre became a platform for essays and writings on design. This aspect of Emigre came to the forefront with issues in 1994 and the magazine changed its format in 1995 from its oversized layout to a text-friendlier format that debuted with Issue 33. The magazine retained this character through Issue 59 in 2001. Emigre then took a sharp turn with four re-formatted issues in 2001 and 2002 that included one DVD (Catfish, an experimental documentary film on the work of designer and performance artist Elliott Earls) and three compact discs (featuring the music of Honey Barbara, The Grassy Knoll and Scenic). In its fifth and final incarnation, the last six issues of Emigre were co-published by Princeton Architectural Press as small softcover books. The last issue, The End, was published in 2005. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in Berkeley, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers exploring the new technology. Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on the profession of graphic design in general. The focus of Emigre was both redundant and wandering—both positive qualities as a journal produced by a tight and evolving group of designers and writers with Vanderlans at the center. Vanderlans was typically editor, though guest-editors also appeared (Gail Swanlund, Anne Burdick, Andrew Blauvelt) and the work/writing of Zuzana Licko and Jeffery Keedy reappeared throughout the magazine's history. The magazine began in 1984 with a focus on the émigré. The first eight issues were concerned with boundaries, international culture, travel accounts and alienation (as the issues' titles suggest). The first eight issues also incorporated a dynamic aesthetic that caught the attention of designers and led to the next stage in the magazine's evolution. Beginning with Issue 9—devoted to the art of Vaughan Oliver at 4AD—the magazine explored design in itself, devoting issues to Cranbrook, the Macintosh, type design and individual graphic designers. Increasingly, Emigre became a platform for essays and writings on design. This aspect of Emigre came to the forefront with issues in 1994 and the magazine changed its format in 1995 from its oversized layout to a text-friendlier format that debuted with Issue 33. The magazine retained this character through Issue 59 in 2001. Emigre then took a sharp turn with four re-formatted issues in 2001 and 2002 that included one DVD (Catfish, an experimental documentary film on the work of designer and performance artist Elliott Earls) and three compact discs (featuring the music of Honey Barbara, The Grassy Knoll and Scenic). In its fifth and final incarnation, the last six issues of Emigre were co-published by Princeton Architectural Press as small softcover books. The last issue, The End, was published in 2005. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in Berkeley, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers exploring the new technology. Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on the profession of graphic design in general. The focus of Emigre was both redundant and wandering—both positive qualities as a journal produced by a tight and evolving group of designers and writers with Vanderlans at the center. Vanderlans was typically editor, though guest-editors also appeared (Gail Swanlund, Anne Burdick, Andrew Blauvelt) and the work/writing of Zuzana Licko and Jeffery Keedy, Kenneth FitzGerald, Lorraine Wild and Diane Gromala reappeared throughout the magazine's history. The magazine began in 1984 with a focus on the émigré. The first eight issues were concerned with boundaries, international culture, travel accounts and alienation (as the issues' titles suggest). The first eight issues also incorporated a dynamic aesthetic that caught the attention of designers and led to the next stage in the magazine's evolution. Beginning with Issue 9—devoted to the art of Vaughan Oliver at 4AD—the magazine explored design in itself, devoting issues to Cranbrook, the Macintosh, type design and individual graphic designers. Increasingly, Emigre became a platform for essays and writings on design. This aspect of Emigre came to the forefront with issues in 1994 and the magazine changed its format in 1995 from its oversized layout to a text-friendlier format that debuted with Issue 33. The magazine retained this character through Issue 59 in 2001. Emigre then took a sharp turn with four re-formatted issues in 2001 and 2002 that included one DVD (Catfish, an experimental documentary film on the work of designer and performance artist Elliott Earls) and three compact discs (featuring the music of Honey Barbara, The Grassy Knoll and Scenic). In its fifth and final incarnation, the last six issues of Emigre were co-published by Princeton Architectural Press as small softcover books. The last issue, The End, was published in 2005. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in Berkeley, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers exploring the new technology. Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on the profession of graphic design in general. The focus of Emigre was both redundant and wandering—both positive qualities as a journal produced by a tight and evolving group of designers and writers with Vanderlans at the center. Vanderlans was typically editor, though guest-editors also appeared (Gail Swanlund, Anne Burdick, Andrew Blauvelt) and the work/writing of Jeffery Keedy, Kenneth FitzGerald, Lorraine Wild and Diane Gromala reappeared throughout the magazine's history. The magazine began in 1984 with a focus on the émigré. The first eight issues were concerned with boundaries, international culture, travel accounts and alienation (as the issues' titles suggest). The first eight issues also incorporated a dynamic aesthetic that caught the attention of designers and led to the next stage in the magazine's evolution. Beginning with Issue 9—devoted to the art of Vaughan Oliver at 4AD—the magazine explored design in itself, devoting issues to Cranbrook, the Macintosh, type design and individual graphic designers. Increasingly, Emigre became a platform for essays and writings on design. This aspect of Emigre came to the forefront with issues in 1994 and the magazine changed its format in 1995 from its oversized layout to a text-friendlier format that debuted with Issue 33. The magazine retained this character through Issue 59 in 2001. Emigre then took a sharp turn with four re-formatted issues in 2001 and 2002 that included one DVD (Catfish, an experimental documentary film on the work of designer and performance artist Elliott Earls) and three compact discs (featuring the music of Honey Barbara, The Grassy Knoll and Scenic). In its fifth and final incarnation, the last six issues of Emigre were co-published by Princeton Architectural Press as small softcover books. The last issue, The End, was published in 2005. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in Berkeley, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers exploring the new technology. Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on the profession of graphic design in general. The focus of Emigre was both redundant and wandering—both positive qualities as a journal produced by a tight and evolving group of designers and writers with Vanderlans at the center. Vanderlans was typically editor, though guest-editors also appeared (Gail Swanlund, Anne Burdick, Andrew Blauvelt) and the work/writing of Jeffery Keedy, Kenneth FitzGerald, Lorraine Wild and Diane Gromala reappeared throughout the magazine's history. The magazine began in 1984 with a focus on émigré artists. The first eight issues were concerned with boundaries, international culture, travel accounts and alienation (as the issues' titles suggest). These eight issues also incorporated a dynamic aesthetic that caught the attention of designers and led to the next stage in the magazine's evolution. Beginning with Issue 9—devoted to the art of Vaughan Oliver at 4AD—the magazine explored design in itself, devoting issues to Cranbrook, the Macintosh, type design, and individual graphic designers. Increasingly, Emigre became a platform for essays and writings on design. This aspect of Emigre came to the forefront with issues in 1994 and the magazine changed its format in 1995 from its oversized layout to a text-friendlier format that debuted with Issue 33. The magazine retained this character through Issue 59 in 2001. Emigre then took a sharp turn with four re-formatted issues in 2001 and 2002 that included one DVD (Catfish, an experimental documentary film on the work of designer and performance artist Elliott Earls) and three compact discs (featuring the music of Honey Barbara, The Grassy Knoll and Scenic). In its fifth and final incarnation, the last six issues of Emigre were co-published by Princeton Architectural Press as small softcover books. The last issue, The End, was published in 2005. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine founded by fellow Dutchmen Marc Susan, Menno Meyjes, and Rudy VanderLans who met in San Francisco. The first four issues were edited by Susan and art directed by VanderLans, with Meyes mostly in an associate publisher role. By issue 6 (1986) Susan and Meyes had left, and all subsequent issues were edited and art directed by VanderLans. In 1985, VanderLans started incorporating the bitmap typefaces designed by Zuzana Licko in his layouts. Licko’s type designs became a prominent feature of the magazine for its entire run. By 1986, Emigre began selling commercial licenses of its digital fonts under the name Emigre Fonts. The magazine was always self-funded, initially through commercial design work performed by VanderLans and Licko under the name Emigre Graphics which became Emigre Fonts. Additional income came from sporadic advertisement sales and subscriptions. Later issues were funded primarily by licensing of digital typefaces. When the magazine began in 1984, featured work by and topics important to émigré artists. The first eight issues were concerned with boundaries, international culture, travel accounts, and alienation (as the issues' titles suggest). These eight issues also incorporated a dynamic aesthetic that caught the attention of other designers. The focus of Emigre was both redundant and wandering—both positive qualities as a journal produced by a tight and evolving group of designers and writers with VanderLans at the center. VanderLans was typically editor, though guest-editors also appeared (Gail Swanlund, Anne Burdick, Andrew Blauvelt) and the work and writing of Jeffery Keedy, Kenneth FitzGerald, Lorraine Wild, and Diane Gromala reappeared throughout the magazine's tenure. Beginning with issue 9—devoted to the art of Vaughan Oliver at 4AD—the magazine explored design itself, devoting issues to Cranbrook, the Macintosh, type design, and individual graphic designers. Increasingly, Emigre's content centered around design writing and critical essays. Design discourse became primary to Emigre's publications by 1994, and the magazine shifted in1995 from its oversized layout to a text-friendlier format that debuted with issue 33. The magazine remained this size until issue 60, released in 2001. Issues 60–64 were accompanied by additional media: and three compact discs (featuring the music of Honey Barbara, The Grassy Knoll and Scenic) and one DVD (Catfish, an experimental documentary film on the work of designer and performance artist Elliott Earls). In its fifth and final incarnation, the last six issues of Emigre were co-published by Princeton Architectural Press as small softcover books. The last issue, The End, was published in 2005. Emigre was one of the first publications to be designed on Macintosh computers and heavily influenced graphic designers exploring the new technology and early digital design. Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles broke away from traditional design practices, making Emigre leaders in Postmodern design and squarely in the middle of controversy. They were equally lauded and criticized for this work. Licko's response that "You read best what you read most," to a question about the legibility of her experimental bitmap fonts in an interview published in issue 15 (1990) incited what would later be known as the "Legibility Wars." Her statement indicated that that fonts such as Helvetica and Times New Roman are not intrinsically legible but become so through repeated use, and it was not entirely well received. 1991, the prominent New York designer Massimo Vignelli criticized Emigre's work calling it "garbage" and "an aberration of culture" in an interview published by Print magazine. This brought much attention to their work and sealed Emigre's reputation as design radicals. Six years later Licko and VanderLans were named AGIA medalists and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art staged a solo exhibition of Emigre's work. In 2007, the Museum of Modern Art (New York) exhibited all 69 issues of Emigre as part of the exhibition "Digitally Mastered." (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine founded by fellow Dutchmen Marc Susan, Menno Meyjes, and Rudy VanderLans who met in San Francisco. The first four issues were edited by Susan and art directed by VanderLans, with Meyes mostly in an associate publisher role. By issue 6 (1986) Susan and Meyes had left, and all subsequent issues were edited and art directed by VanderLans. In 1985, VanderLans started incorporating the bitmap typefaces designed by Zuzana Licko in his layouts. Licko’s type designs became a prominent feature of the magazine for its entire run. By 1986, Emigre began selling commercial licenses of its digital fonts under the name Emigre Fonts. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was an award-wining quarterly magazine published from 1984 until 2005 in Berkeley, California dedicated to visual communication, graphic design, typography, and design criticism. Produced by Rudy VanderLans (editor and art director) and Zuzana Licko (type designer and typesetter), Emigre was known for creating some of the very first digital layouts and typeface designs. Exposure to Licko's typefaces through the magazine lead to the creation of Emigre Fonts in 1985. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was an award-wining (mostly) quarterly magazine published from 1984 until 2005 in Berkeley, California dedicated to visual communication, graphic design, typography, and design criticism. Produced by Rudy VanderLans (editor and art director) and Zuzana Licko (type designer and typesetter), Emigre was known for creating some of the very first digital layouts and typeface designs. Exposure to Licko's typefaces through the magazine lead to the creation of Emigre Fonts in 1985. (en)
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  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in San Francisco, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers moving into desktop publishing (DTP). Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on other design publications. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in Berkeley, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers exploring desktop publishing (DTP). Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on other design publications. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in Berkeley, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers exploring the new technology. Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on other design publications. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine published by Emigre Graphics between 1984 and 2005; it was first published in 1984 in Berkeley, California, United States. Art-directed by Rudy VanderLans using fonts designed by his wife, Zuzana Licko, Emigre was one of the first publications to use Macintosh computers and had a large influence on graphic designers exploring the new technology. Its variety of layouts, use of guest designers, and opinionated articles also had an effect on the profession of graphic design in general. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was a graphic design magazine founded by fellow Dutchmen Marc Susan, Menno Meyjes, and Rudy VanderLans who met in San Francisco. The first four issues were edited by Susan and art directed by VanderLans, with Meyes mostly in an associate publisher role. By issue 6 (1986) Susan and Meyes had left, and all subsequent issues were edited and art directed by VanderLans. In 1985, VanderLans started incorporating the bitmap typefaces designed by Zuzana Licko in his layouts. Licko’s type designs became a prominent feature of the magazine for its entire run. By 1986, Emigre began selling commercial licenses of its digital fonts under the name Emigre Fonts. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was an award-wining quarterly magazine published from 1984 until 2005 in Berkeley, California dedicated to visual communication, graphic design, typography, and design criticism. Produced by Rudy VanderLans (editor and art director) and Zuzana Licko (type designer and typesetter), Emigre was known for creating some of the very first digital layouts and typeface designs. Exposure to Licko's typefaces through the magazine lead to the creation of Emigre Fonts in 1985. (en)
  • Emigre (ISSN 1045-3717) was an award-wining (mostly) quarterly magazine published from 1984 until 2005 in Berkeley, California dedicated to visual communication, graphic design, typography, and design criticism. Produced by Rudy VanderLans (editor and art director) and Zuzana Licko (type designer and typesetter), Emigre was known for creating some of the very first digital layouts and typeface designs. Exposure to Licko's typefaces through the magazine lead to the creation of Emigre Fonts in 1985. (en)
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  • Emigre (magazine) (en)
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  • Emigre (en)
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