Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. In general, a distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music), and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments include mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers, and so on, and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-produc

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. In general, a distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music), and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments include mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers, and so on, and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer, and computer can produce electronic sounds. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century, and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry, and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began having a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines, and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers, and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 were popularized, and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became prevalent in the popular domain by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Today, pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream culture as opposed to its preceding forms which were specialized to niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became popular by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became popular by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example, Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became popular by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. The ffirst electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became popular by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became popular by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology, thus encompassing, in a broad sense, all music that feature the use of any kind of tools driven by electricity, either intended to be used as musical instruments or not, to generate sound as total or partial parts of the musical works. However, two kind of electric instruments, namelly electric guitars and electric basses, became prevalent of the rock genres in the 1950s, and typically music made exclusively with them (along with other natural instruments) , as rock & roll or jazz, is not regarded as "electronic". (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology, thus encompassing, in a broad sense, all music that feature the use of any kind of tools driven by electricity, either intended to be used as musical instruments or not, to generate sound as total or partial parts of the musical works. However, two kind of electric instruments, namelly electric guitars and electric basses, became prevalent of the rock genres in the 1950s, and typically music made exclusively with them (along with other natural instruments), as rock & roll or jazz, is not regarded as "electronic" but "electroacoustic". (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. Isao Tomita is regarded as as one of the pioneers of electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became popular by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital is een niet heel leuke oort muziek want die is voor oude manne van 107 jaar dus luister er niet naar is slecht voor het gehoor instruments or circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became popular by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is niet goed want het is voor oude pekes want ze zijn107 jaar dus luister er niet naar want het is slecht voor het gehoormusic that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). In the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the 1980s, electronic music became more dominant in popular music, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines such as the Roland TR-808 and bass synthesizers such as the TB-303. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and a group of musicians and music merchants developed the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Electronically produced music became popular by the 1990s, because of the advent of affordable music technology. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. In some cases, a distinction is made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electronic music includes several subgenres. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. In the late 1960s, music produced using electronics became popular due to a more availability of electronic device as synthetizers. Popular genres as rock, pop and classical music started to adopt it, resulting in electronically based subgenres. In the late 1980s, electronic dance music (EDM) records made using only electronic instruments became increasingly popular, resulting in a proliferation of electronic genres, subgenres, and scenes. Today, the term electronic music serves to differentiate music that uses electronics as its focal point or inspiration, from music that uses electronics mainly in service of creating an intended production that may have some electronic elements in the sound but does not focus upon them. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). During the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was devleoped. In the same decade, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines, electronic popular music came to the fore. During the 1990s, with the proliferation of increasingly affordable music technology, electronic music production became an estbalished part of popular culture. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments, or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). During the 1960s, live electronics were pioneered in America and Europe, Japanese electronic musical instruments began influencing the music industry and Jamaican dub music emerged as a form of popular electronic music. In the early 1970s, the monophonic Minimoog synthesizer and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. In the 1970s, electronic music began to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was devleoped. In the same decade, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines, electronic popular music came to the fore. During the 1990s, with the proliferation of increasingly affordable music technology, electronic music production became an estbalished part of popular culture. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments, or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s (although algorithmic composition per se without a computer had occurred much earlier, for example Mozart's Musikalisches Würfelspiel). During the 1960s, digital computer music was pioneered, innovation in live electronics took place, and Japanese electronic musical instruments began to influence the music industry. In the early 1970s, Moog synthesizers and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. The 1970s also saw electronic music begin to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was devleoped. In the same decade, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines, electronic popular music came to the fore. During the 1990s, with the proliferation of increasingly affordable music technology, electronic music production became an estbalished part of popular culture. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments, or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s. During the 1960s, digital computer music was pioneered, innovation in live electronics took place, and Japanese electronic musical instruments began to influence the music industry. In the early 1970s, Moog synthesizers and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. The 1970s also saw electronic music begin to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the early 1980s, digital technologies for synthesizers including digital synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 became popular and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was devleoped. In the same decade, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines, electronic popular music came to the fore. During the 1990s, with the proliferation of increasingly affordable music technology, electronic music production became an estbalished part of popular culture. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments, or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. The first electronic devices for performing music were developed at the end of the 19th century and shortly afterward Italian futurists explored sounds that had not been considered musical. During the 1920s and 1930s, electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s. An important new development was the advent of computers to compose music. Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the 1950s. During the 1960s, digital computer music was pioneered, innovation in live electronics took place, and Japanese electronic musical instruments began to influence the music industry. In the early 1970s, Moog synthesizers and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. The 1970s also saw electronic music begin to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the early 1980s mass produced digital synthesizers, such as the Yamaha DX7, became popular and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was developed. In the same decade, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines, electronic popular music came to the fore. During the 1990s, with the proliferation of increasingly affordable music technology, electronic music production became an established part of popular culture. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments, or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. The first electronic musical devices were developed at the end of the 19th century. During the 1920s and 1930s, a number of electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions for electronic instruments were made. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s and Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the same decade. During the 1960s, digital computer music was pioneered, innovation in live electronics took place, and Japanese electronic musical instruments began to influence the music industry. In the early 1970s, Moog synthesizers and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. The 1970s also saw electronic music begin to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the early 1980s mass produced digital synthesizers, such as the Yamaha DX7, became popular and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was developed. In the same decade, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines, electronic popular music came to the fore. During the 1990s, with the proliferation of increasingly affordable music technology, electronic music production became an established part of popular culture. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments, or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. The first electronic musical devices were developed at the end of the 19th century. During the 1920s and 1930s, a number of electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions featuring them were written. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s and Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the same decade. During the 1960s, digital computer music was pioneered, innovation in live electronics took place, and Japanese electronic musical instruments began to influence the music industry. In the early 1970s, Moog synthesizers and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. The 1970s also saw electronic music begin to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the early 1980s mass produced digital synthesizers, such as the Yamaha DX7, became popular and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was developed. In the same decade, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines, electronic popular music came to the fore. During the 1990s, with the proliferation of increasingly affordable music technology, electronic music production became an established part of popular culture. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments, or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. The first electronic musical devices were developed at the end of the 19th century. During the 1920s and 1930s, a number of electronic instruments were introduced and the first compositions featuring them were written. By the 1940s, magnetic audio tape allowed musicians to tape sounds and then modify them by changing the tape speed or direction, leading to the development of electroacoustic tape music in the 1940s, in Egypt and France. Musique concrète, created in Paris in 1948, was based on editing together recorded fragments of natural and industrial sounds. Music produced solely from electronic generators was first produced in Germany in 1953. Electronic music was also created in Japan and the United States beginning in the 1950s and Algorithmic composition with computers was first demonstrated in the same decade. During the 1960s, digital computer music was pioneered, innovation in live electronics took place, and Japanese electronic musical instruments began to influence the music industry. In the early 1970s, Moog synthesizers and Japanese drum machines helped popularize synthesized electronic music. The 1970s also saw electronic music begin to have a significant influence on popular music, with the adoption of polyphonic synthesizers, electronic drums, drum machines and turntables, through the emergence of genres such as disco, krautrock, new wave, synth-pop, hip hop and EDM. In the early 1980s mass produced digital synthesizers, such as the Yamaha DX7, became popular and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was developed. In the same decade, with a greater reliance on synthesizers and the adoption of programmable drum machines, electronic popular music came to the fore. During the 1990s, with the proliferation of increasingly affordable music technology, electronic music production became an established part of popular culture. Contemporary electronic music includes many varieties and ranges from experimental art music to popular forms such as electronic dance music. Pop electronic music is most recognizable in its 4/4 form and more connected with the mainstream than preceding forms which were popular in niche markets. (en)
dbo:derivative
dbo:instrument
dbo:musicFusionGenre
dbo:musicSubgenre
dbo:stylisticOrigin
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-04-24 16:19:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 07:25:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 16:23:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-08 12:36:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-08 16:18:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-13 15:34:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-13 17:40:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-16 15:07:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-16 19:13:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-22 08:09:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-30 18:12:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-30 18:17:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 05:17:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-06 20:24:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-09 08:35:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-09 08:46:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 13:24:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 13:39:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 14:05:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 14:46:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-23 17:57:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-23 18:01:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-24 06:18:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 11:55:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 11:59:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 12:02:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 12:07:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 12:09:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 12:10:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 22:19:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-03 18:39:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-03 18:51:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-11 14:00:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-11 14:23:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-29 12:53:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-29 12:57:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-29 15:35:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-07 09:13:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-07 17:40:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-15 15:56:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-08 17:14:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 18:36:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 18:40:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 18:42:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 18:46:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 19:26:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-18 20:39:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-27 05:33:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-27 08:43:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-02 17:37:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-03 02:11:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-05 08:40:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-05 17:56:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 16:40:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 17:00:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-13 09:34:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-13 16:40:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 00:20:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 00:22:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-17 15:00:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-28 15:02:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-01 09:34:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-01 11:39:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-01 11:40:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-02 14:25:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-02 14:25:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-03 19:50:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-06 02:29:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-10 19:39:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-12 20:42:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-12 20:43:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-15 16:12:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 07:57:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 08:58:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 09:32:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 09:47:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 09:48:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:09:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:19:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:24:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:41:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:44:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:57:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:58:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 14:25:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:19:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:20:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:38:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:49:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:56:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 17:31:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 17:36:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 17:51:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 18:04:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 19:32:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 21:59:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 07:40:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 07:57:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 08:09:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 08:27:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 08:58:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:21:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:23:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:42:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 13:02:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 18:04:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 20:27:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 10:35:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 14:19:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 14:21:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 15:09:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 17:34:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 02:20:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 05:56:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 06:07:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-29 16:30:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-03 11:23:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-07 21:02:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-09 13:46:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-18 06:18:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-23 00:05:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-07 04:03:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-20 10:58:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-20 12:21:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-22 14:36:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-27 02:53:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-30 19:46:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-30 19:46:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-30 19:48:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-30 19:49:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-06 17:15:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 02:30:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 12:24:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 12:25:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 12:48:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:37:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:39:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:47:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:49:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:51:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:53:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 12:00:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 12:00:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-20 16:47:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-20 16:50:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-20 17:03:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-07 15:11:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-07 15:15:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-07 15:17:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-08 02:15:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-12 13:58:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-12 15:18:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-16 18:31:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-16 18:34:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-16 19:39:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-16 19:39:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-16 19:48:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-17 13:55:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-17 13:55:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-26 19:40:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-04-10 16:41:54Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 9510 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 127310 (xsd:integer)
  • 127316 (xsd:integer)
  • 127388 (xsd:integer)
  • 127394 (xsd:integer)
  • 127397 (xsd:integer)
  • 127412 (xsd:integer)
  • 127413 (xsd:integer)
  • 127417 (xsd:integer)
  • 127426 (xsd:integer)
  • 127438 (xsd:integer)
  • 127497 (xsd:integer)
  • 127507 (xsd:integer)
  • 127519 (xsd:integer)
  • 127524 (xsd:integer)
  • 127567 (xsd:integer)
  • 127619 (xsd:integer)
  • 127629 (xsd:integer)
  • 127663 (xsd:integer)
  • 127679 (xsd:integer)
  • 127708 (xsd:integer)
  • 127999 (xsd:integer)
  • 128730 (xsd:integer)
  • 129035 (xsd:integer)
  • 129036 (xsd:integer)
  • 129037 (xsd:integer)
  • 129044 (xsd:integer)
  • 129051 (xsd:integer)
  • 129055 (xsd:integer)
  • 129058 (xsd:integer)
  • 129077 (xsd:integer)
  • 129156 (xsd:integer)
  • 129200 (xsd:integer)
  • 129538 (xsd:integer)
  • 129541 (xsd:integer)
  • 129542 (xsd:integer)
  • 129555 (xsd:integer)
  • 129556 (xsd:integer)
  • 129560 (xsd:integer)
  • 129562 (xsd:integer)
  • 129566 (xsd:integer)
  • 129567 (xsd:integer)
  • 129570 (xsd:integer)
  • 129581 (xsd:integer)
  • 129583 (xsd:integer)
  • 129584 (xsd:integer)
  • 129585 (xsd:integer)
  • 129591 (xsd:integer)
  • 129595 (xsd:integer)
  • 129604 (xsd:integer)
  • 129637 (xsd:integer)
  • 129679 (xsd:integer)
  • 129819 (xsd:integer)
  • 130043 (xsd:integer)
  • 131426 (xsd:integer)
  • 131926 (xsd:integer)
  • 132064 (xsd:integer)
  • 132125 (xsd:integer)
  • 132854 (xsd:integer)
  • 132913 (xsd:integer)
  • 133149 (xsd:integer)
  • 133173 (xsd:integer)
  • 135431 (xsd:integer)
  • 135453 (xsd:integer)
  • 135454 (xsd:integer)
  • 135463 (xsd:integer)
  • 135691 (xsd:integer)
  • 135876 (xsd:integer)
  • 136522 (xsd:integer)
  • 137634 (xsd:integer)
  • 137710 (xsd:integer)
  • 137767 (xsd:integer)
  • 137871 (xsd:integer)
  • 137897 (xsd:integer)
  • 137900 (xsd:integer)
  • 137901 (xsd:integer)
  • 138470 (xsd:integer)
  • 138790 (xsd:integer)
  • 139112 (xsd:integer)
  • 139113 (xsd:integer)
  • 139708 (xsd:integer)
  • 141577 (xsd:integer)
  • 141610 (xsd:integer)
  • 141646 (xsd:integer)
  • 141664 (xsd:integer)
  • 141680 (xsd:integer)
  • 141698 (xsd:integer)
  • 141711 (xsd:integer)
  • 141736 (xsd:integer)
  • 141767 (xsd:integer)
  • 141968 (xsd:integer)
  • 141971 (xsd:integer)
  • 141980 (xsd:integer)
  • 141981 (xsd:integer)
  • 141985 (xsd:integer)
  • 142089 (xsd:integer)
  • 142119 (xsd:integer)
  • 142153 (xsd:integer)
  • 142182 (xsd:integer)
  • 142321 (xsd:integer)
  • 142385 (xsd:integer)
  • 142392 (xsd:integer)
  • 142394 (xsd:integer)
  • 142398 (xsd:integer)
  • 142458 (xsd:integer)
  • 142626 (xsd:integer)
  • 142665 (xsd:integer)
  • 142667 (xsd:integer)
  • 142669 (xsd:integer)
  • 142683 (xsd:integer)
  • 142685 (xsd:integer)
  • 142699 (xsd:integer)
  • 142722 (xsd:integer)
  • 142730 (xsd:integer)
  • 142736 (xsd:integer)
  • 142787 (xsd:integer)
  • 142796 (xsd:integer)
  • 143013 (xsd:integer)
  • 143031 (xsd:integer)
  • 143057 (xsd:integer)
  • 143076 (xsd:integer)
  • 143103 (xsd:integer)
  • 143280 (xsd:integer)
  • 143282 (xsd:integer)
  • 143587 (xsd:integer)
  • 143748 (xsd:integer)
  • 143905 (xsd:integer)
  • 143952 (xsd:integer)
  • 143999 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-04-24 16:19:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 07:25:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 16:23:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-08 12:36:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-08 16:18:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-13 15:34:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-13 17:40:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-16 15:07:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-16 19:13:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-22 08:09:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-30 18:11:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-30 18:17:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-02 05:17:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-06 20:24:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-09 08:35:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-09 08:46:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 13:24:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 13:38:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 14:05:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 14:46:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-24 06:18:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 11:55:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 11:58:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 12:02:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 12:07:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 12:09:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 12:10:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-28 22:19:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-03 18:38:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-03 18:50:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-11 13:59:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-11 14:23:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-29 12:57:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-29 15:34:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-07 09:12:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-07 17:40:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-15 15:56:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-08 17:13:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 18:36:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 18:40:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 18:42:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 18:46:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 19:26:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-18 20:39:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-27 05:33:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-27 08:43:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-02 17:37:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-03 02:11:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-05 08:40:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-05 17:56:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 16:40:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 17:00:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-13 09:34:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-13 16:40:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 00:20:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 00:22:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-17 15:00:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-28 15:02:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-01 09:34:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-01 11:39:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-01 11:39:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-03 19:50:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-06 02:29:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-10 19:38:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-12 20:42:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-12 20:43:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-15 16:12:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 07:57:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 08:58:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 09:31:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 09:47:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-19 09:48:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:09:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:19:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:24:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:41:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:44:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:57:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 08:58:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 14:25:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:19:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:20:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:38:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:49:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 16:56:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 17:31:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 17:35:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 17:51:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 18:04:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 19:32:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-20 21:59:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 07:40:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 07:57:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 08:09:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 08:27:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 08:58:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:21:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:23:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:42:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 13:02:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 18:04:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 20:27:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 10:35:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 14:19:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 14:21:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 15:08:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 17:34:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 02:20:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 05:56:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 06:06:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-29 16:30:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-03 11:22:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-07 21:02:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-09 13:46:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-18 06:18:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-23 00:05:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-07 04:02:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-20 10:58:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-20 12:21:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-22 14:35:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-27 02:53:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-30 19:46:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-30 19:46:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-30 19:48:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-30 19:49:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-06 17:15:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 02:30:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 12:24:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 12:25:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 12:48:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:37:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:38:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:46:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:48:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:51:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:53:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 11:59:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-18 12:00:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-20 16:47:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-20 16:50:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-20 17:03:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-07 15:11:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-07 15:15:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-07 15:17:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-08 02:15:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-12 13:58:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-12 15:18:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-16 18:31:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-16 18:34:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-16 19:39:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-16 19:47:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-17 13:55:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-17 13:55:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-26 19:40:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-04-10 16:41:45Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 626 (xsd:integer)
  • 627 (xsd:integer)
  • 628 (xsd:integer)
  • 629 (xsd:integer)
  • 630 (xsd:integer)
  • 631 (xsd:integer)
  • 632 (xsd:integer)
  • 635 (xsd:integer)
  • 636 (xsd:integer)
  • 637 (xsd:integer)
  • 638 (xsd:integer)
  • 640 (xsd:integer)
  • 642 (xsd:integer)
  • 644 (xsd:integer)
  • 647 (xsd:integer)
  • 648 (xsd:integer)
  • 649 (xsd:integer)
  • 650 (xsd:integer)
  • 651 (xsd:integer)
  • 652 (xsd:integer)
  • 672 (xsd:integer)
  • 673 (xsd:integer)
  • 676 (xsd:integer)
  • 695 (xsd:integer)
  • 696 (xsd:integer)
  • 697 (xsd:integer)
  • 700 (xsd:integer)
  • 708 (xsd:integer)
  • 720 (xsd:integer)
  • 721 (xsd:integer)
  • 723 (xsd:integer)
  • 724 (xsd:integer)
  • 726 (xsd:integer)
  • 728 (xsd:integer)
  • 731 (xsd:integer)
  • 733 (xsd:integer)
  • 735 (xsd:integer)
  • 736 (xsd:integer)
  • 752 (xsd:integer)
  • 753 (xsd:integer)
  • 754 (xsd:integer)
  • 756 (xsd:integer)
  • 757 (xsd:integer)
  • 758 (xsd:integer)
  • 767 (xsd:integer)
  • 768 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 952893237 (xsd:integer)
  • 954019270 (xsd:integer)
  • 954086839 (xsd:integer)
  • 955550591 (xsd:integer)
  • 955581370 (xsd:integer)
  • 956476413 (xsd:integer)
  • 956494911 (xsd:integer)
  • 957011283 (xsd:integer)
  • 957052623 (xsd:integer)
  • 958170849 (xsd:integer)
  • 959802561 (xsd:integer)
  • 959803377 (xsd:integer)
  • 960297586 (xsd:integer)
  • 961138205 (xsd:integer)
  • 961581062 (xsd:integer)
  • 961582061 (xsd:integer)
  • 963904377 (xsd:integer)
  • 963906328 (xsd:integer)
  • 963909967 (xsd:integer)
  • 963915890 (xsd:integer)
  • 964214944 (xsd:integer)
  • 964925773 (xsd:integer)
  • 964926107 (xsd:integer)
  • 964926401 (xsd:integer)
  • 964926993 (xsd:integer)
  • 964927204 (xsd:integer)
  • 964927288 (xsd:integer)
  • 965014719 (xsd:integer)
  • 965842891 (xsd:integer)
  • 965844662 (xsd:integer)
  • 967159477 (xsd:integer)
  • 967162117 (xsd:integer)
  • 970130734 (xsd:integer)
  • 970152615 (xsd:integer)
  • 971630402 (xsd:integer)
  • 971697195 (xsd:integer)
  • 973137319 (xsd:integer)
  • 977406137 (xsd:integer)
  • 977746568 (xsd:integer)
  • 977747091 (xsd:integer)
  • 977747286 (xsd:integer)
  • 977747771 (xsd:integer)
  • 977753112 (xsd:integer)
  • 979107975 (xsd:integer)
  • 980558223 (xsd:integer)
  • 980579977 (xsd:integer)
  • 981496950 (xsd:integer)
  • 981558925 (xsd:integer)
  • 981941319 (xsd:integer)
  • 982011738 (xsd:integer)
  • 982181287 (xsd:integer)
  • 982184303 (xsd:integer)
  • 983277765 (xsd:integer)
  • 983331465 (xsd:integer)
  • 983570372 (xsd:integer)
  • 983570650 (xsd:integer)
  • 983996877 (xsd:integer)
  • 985886494 (xsd:integer)
  • 986512285 (xsd:integer)
  • 986523997 (xsd:integer)
  • 986524017 (xsd:integer)
  • 986922959 (xsd:integer)
  • 987290911 (xsd:integer)
  • 988053442 (xsd:integer)
  • 988380681 (xsd:integer)
  • 988380876 (xsd:integer)
  • 988843992 (xsd:integer)
  • 989488896 (xsd:integer)
  • 989494088 (xsd:integer)
  • 989497827 (xsd:integer)
  • 989499280 (xsd:integer)
  • 989499411 (xsd:integer)
  • 989660380 (xsd:integer)
  • 989661211 (xsd:integer)
  • 989661683 (xsd:integer)
  • 989663210 (xsd:integer)
  • 989663581 (xsd:integer)
  • 989664667 (xsd:integer)
  • 989664785 (xsd:integer)
  • 989699353 (xsd:integer)
  • 989714880 (xsd:integer)
  • 989715004 (xsd:integer)
  • 989717440 (xsd:integer)
  • 989718822 (xsd:integer)
  • 989719768 (xsd:integer)
  • 989724349 (xsd:integer)
  • 989724989 (xsd:integer)
  • 989727059 (xsd:integer)
  • 989728800 (xsd:integer)
  • 989740816 (xsd:integer)
  • 989763063 (xsd:integer)
  • 989827850 (xsd:integer)
  • 989829275 (xsd:integer)
  • 989830157 (xsd:integer)
  • 989831652 (xsd:integer)
  • 989834321 (xsd:integer)
  • 989855091 (xsd:integer)
  • 989855333 (xsd:integer)
  • 989857970 (xsd:integer)
  • 989860233 (xsd:integer)
  • 989902883 (xsd:integer)
  • 989929037 (xsd:integer)
  • 990590582 (xsd:integer)
  • 990613683 (xsd:integer)
  • 990613894 (xsd:integer)
  • 990619955 (xsd:integer)
  • 990639871 (xsd:integer)
  • 990711458 (xsd:integer)
  • 990734599 (xsd:integer)
  • 990735595 (xsd:integer)
  • 991350891 (xsd:integer)
  • 992080625 (xsd:integer)
  • 992924598 (xsd:integer)
  • 993227256 (xsd:integer)
  • 994919347 (xsd:integer)
  • 995805410 (xsd:integer)
  • 998812023 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001591707 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001601786 (xsd:integer)
  • 1002034204 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003023863 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003805580 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003805662 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003806025 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003806167 (xsd:integer)
  • 1005232250 (xsd:integer)
  • 1006840214 (xsd:integer)
  • 1006901443 (xsd:integer)
  • 1006901544 (xsd:integer)
  • 1006903734 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007489179 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007489310 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007490077 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007490242 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007490457 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007490615 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007491251 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007491350 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007919930 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007920435 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007922822 (xsd:integer)
  • 1010827117 (xsd:integer)
  • 1010827676 (xsd:integer)
  • 1010827972 (xsd:integer)
  • 1010926399 (xsd:integer)
  • 1011726491 (xsd:integer)
  • 1011737800 (xsd:integer)
  • 1012501857 (xsd:integer)
  • 1012502408 (xsd:integer)
  • 1012512258 (xsd:integer)
  • 1012513690 (xsd:integer)
  • 1012636782 (xsd:integer)
  • 1012636814 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014385326 (xsd:integer)
  • 1017070429 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. In general, a distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music), and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments include mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers, and so on, and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-produc (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such a (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-producing mechanis (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers or other sound-producing mechanisms. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology, thus encompassing, in a broad sense, all music that feature the use of any kind of tools driven by electricity, either intended to be used as musical instruments or not, to generate sound as total or partial parts of the musical works. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital is een niet heel leuke oort muziek want die is voor oude manne van 107 jaar dus luister er niet naar is slecht voor het gehoor instruments or circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifi (en)
  • Electronic music is niet goed want het is voor oude pekes want ze zijn107 jaar dus luister er niet naar want het is slecht voor het gehoormusic that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology. A distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments have mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and sp (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology such as the theremin, synthesizer and computer can produce electronic sounds. In some cases, a distinction is made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music) and that produced using electronics only. Electronic music includes several subgenres. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. (en)
  • Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments, or circuitry-based music technology in its creation. It includes both music made using electronic and electromechanical means (electroacoustic music). Pure electronic instruments depended entirely on circuitry-based sound generation, for instance using devices such as an electronic oscillator, theremin, or synthesizer. Electromechanical instruments can have mechanical parts such as strings, hammers, and electric elements including magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Such electromechanical devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, electric piano and the electric guitar. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Electronic music (en)
rdfs:seeAlso
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:homepage
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Electronic music (en)
is dbo:field of
is dbo:genre of
is dbo:industry of
is dbo:instrument of
is dbo:knownFor of
is dbo:occupation of
is dbo:product of
is dbo:programmeFormat of
is dbo:recordLabel of
is dbo:recordedIn of
is dbo:stylisticOrigin of
is dbo:type of
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:genre of
is dbp:style of
is dbp:stylisticOrigins of
is dbp:subject of
is rdfs:seeAlso of
is skos:subject of
is foaf:primaryTopic of