(This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. After President Harry S. Truman ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction of the Democratic Party, determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation.

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dbo:abstract
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. After President Harry S. Truman ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction of the Democratic Party, determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. Supporters assumed control of the state Democratic parties in part or in full in several Southern states. The Party opposed racial integration and wanted to retain Jim Crow laws and white supremacy in the face of possible federal intervention. Its members were referred to as "Dixiecrats", a portmanteau of "Dixie", referring to the Southern United States, and "Democrat". The party did not run local or state candidates. After the 1948 election, its leaders generally returned to the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats had little short-run influence on politics, but they represented the weakening of the "Solid South". (This referred to the Democratic Party's total control of presidential elections in the South and most seats in Congress, largely through decades of disenfranchisement of blacks since the turn of the century. Blacks had historically been aligned with the Republican Party before being excluded from politics in the region.) The term "Dixiecrat" has sometimes been used by Northern Democrats to refer to conservative Southern Democrats from the 1940s to the 1990s, regardless of any views expressed about white supremacy or segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. After President Harry S. Truman ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction of the Democratic Party, determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. Supporters assumed control of the state Democratic parties in part or in full in several Southern states. The Party opposed racial integration and wanted to retain Jim Crow laws and white supremacy in the face of possible federal intervention. Its members were referred to as "Dixiecrats", a portmanteau of "Dixie", referring to the Southern United States, and "Democrat". The party did not run local or state candidates. After the 1948 election, its leaders generally returned to the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats presidential candidate, Strom Thurmond became a Republican in 1964. The Dixiecrats had little short-run influence on politics, but they represented the weakening of the "Solid South". (This referred to the Democratic Party's total control of presidential elections in the South and most seats in Congress, largely through decades of disenfranchisement of blacks since the turn of the century. Blacks had historically been aligned with the Republican Party before being excluded from politics in the region.) The term "Dixiecrat" has sometimes been used by Northern Democrats to refer to conservative Southern Democrats from the 1940s to the 1990s, regardless of any views expressed about white supremacy or segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member the the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction of the Democratic Party, determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. Supporters assumed control of the state Democratic parties in part or in full in several Southern states. The Party opposed racial integration and wanted to retain Jim Crow laws and white supremacy in the face of possible federal intervention. Its members were referred to as "Dixiecrats", a portmanteau of "Dixie", referring to the Southern United States, and "Democrat". Despite the Dixiecrat's success in several states, Truman was narrowly elected. After the 1948 election, its leaders generally returned to the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats presidential candidate, Strom Thurmond became a Republican in 1964. The Dixiecrats represented the weakening of the "Solid South". (This referred to the Southern Democratic Party's control of presidential elections in the South and most seats in Congress, partly through decades of disenfranchisement of blacks since the turn of the century. Blacks had formerly been aligned with the Republican Party before being excluded from politics in the region, but during the Great Migration African Americans had found the Democratic Party in the North and West more suited to their interests.) The term "Dixiecrat" has sometimes been used by Northern Democrats to refer to conservative Southern Democrats from the 1940s to the 1990s, regardless of any views expressed about white supremacy or segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member the the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction, determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. Supporters assumed control of the state Democratic parties in part or in full in several Southern states. The Party opposed racial integration and wanted to retain Jim Crow laws and white supremacy in the face of possible federal intervention. Its members were referred to as "Dixiecrats", a portmanteau of "Dixie", referring to the Southern United States, and "Democrat". Despite the Dixiecrat's success in several states, Truman was narrowly elected. After the 1948 election, its leaders generally returned to the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats presidential candidate, Strom Thurmond became a Republican in 1964. The Dixiecrats represented the weakening of the "Solid South". (This referred to the Southern Democratic Party's control of presidential elections in the South and most seats in Congress, partly through decades of disenfranchisement of blacks since the turn of the century. Blacks had formerly been aligned with the Republican Party before being excluded from politics in the region, but during the Great Migration African Americans had found the Democratic Party in the North and West more suited to their interests.) The term "Dixiecrat" has sometimes been used by Northern Democrats to refer to conservative Southern Democrats from the 1940s to the 1990s, regardless of any views expressed about white supremacy or segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member the the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction, determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. Supporters assumed control of the state Democratic parties in part or in full in several Southern states. The Party opposed racial integration and wanted to retain Jim Crow laws and white supremacy in the face of possible federal intervention. Its members were referred to as "Dixiecrats", a portmanteau of "Dixie", referring to the Southern United States, and "Democrat". Despite the Dixiecrat's success in several states, Truman was narrowly re-elected. After the 1948 election, its leaders generally returned to the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats presidential candidate, Strom Thurmond became a Republican in 1964. The Dixiecrats represented the weakening of the "Solid South". (This referred to the Southern Democratic Party's control of presidential elections in the South and most seats in Congress, partly through decades of disenfranchisement of blacks since the turn of the century. Blacks had formerly been aligned with the Republican Party before being excluded from politics in the region, but during the Great Migration African Americans had found the Democratic Party in the North and West more suited to their interests.) The term "Dixiecrat" has sometimes been used by Northern Democrats to refer to conservative Southern Democrats from the 1940s to the 1990s, regardless of any views expressed about white supremacy or segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member the the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction. The Dixiecrats determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. Supporters assumed control of the state Democratic parties in part or in full in several Southern states. The Party opposed racial integration and wanted to retain Jim Crow laws and white supremacy in the face of possible federal intervention. Its members were referred to as "Dixiecrats", a portmanteau of "Dixie", referring to the Southern United States, and "Democrat". Despite the Dixiecrat's success in several states, Truman was narrowly re-elected. After the 1948 election, its leaders generally returned to the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats presidential candidate, Strom Thurmond became a Republican in 1964. The Dixiecrats represented the weakening of the "Solid South". (This referred to the Southern Democratic Party's control of presidential elections in the South and most seats in Congress, partly through decades of disenfranchisement of blacks since the turn of the century. Blacks had formerly been aligned with the Republican Party before being excluded from politics in the region, but during the Great Migration African Americans had found the Democratic Party in the North and West more suited to their interests.) The term "Dixiecrat" has sometimes been used by Northern Democrats to refer to conservative Southern Democrats from the 1940s to the 1990s, regardless of any views expressed about white supremacy or segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member the the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction. The Dixiecrats were determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. Supporters assumed control of the state Democratic parties in part or in full in several Southern states. The Party opposed racial integration and wanted to retain Jim Crow laws and white supremacy in the face of possible federal intervention. Its members were referred to as "Dixiecrats", a portmanteau of "Dixie", referring to the Southern United States, and "Democrat". Despite the Dixiecrat's success in several states, Truman was narrowly re-elected. After the 1948 election, its leaders generally returned to the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats presidential candidate, Strom Thurmond became a Republican in 1964. The Dixiecrats represented the weakening of the "Solid South". (This referred to the Southern Democratic Party's control of presidential elections in the South and most seats in Congress, partly through decades of disenfranchisement of blacks since the turn of the century. Blacks had formerly been aligned with the Republican Party before being excluded from politics in the region, but during the Great Migration African Americans had found the Democratic Party in the North and West more suited to their interests.) The term "Dixiecrat" has sometimes been used by Northern Democrats to refer to conservative Southern Democrats from the 1940s to the 1990s, regardless of any views expressed about white supremacy or segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member of the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction. The Dixiecrats were determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. Supporters assumed control of the state Democratic parties in part or in full in several Southern states. The Party opposed racial integration and wanted to retain Jim Crow laws and white supremacy in the face of possible federal intervention. Its members were referred to as "Dixiecrats", a portmanteau of "Dixie", referring to the Southern United States, and "Democrat". Despite the Dixiecrat's success in several states, Truman was narrowly re-elected. After the 1948 election, its leaders generally returned to the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats presidential candidate, Strom Thurmond became a Republican in 1964. The Dixiecrats represented the weakening of the "Solid South". (This referred to the Southern Democratic Party's control of presidential elections in the South and most seats in Congress, partly through decades of disenfranchisement of blacks since the turn of the century. Blacks had formerly been aligned with the Republican Party before being excluded from politics in the region, but during the Great Migration African Americans had found the Democratic Party in the North and West more suited to their interests.) The term "Dixiecrat" has sometimes been used by Northern Democrats to refer to conservative Southern Democrats from the 1940s to the 1990s, regardless of any views expressed about white supremacy or segregation. (en)
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  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. After President Harry S. Truman ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction of the Democratic Party, determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member the the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction of the Democratic Party, determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segrega (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member the the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction, determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member the the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction. The Dixiecrats determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member the the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction. The Dixiecrats were determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. (en)
  • (This article is about the American political party established in 1948. For the post-Reconstruction southern conservative Democratic Party, see Solid South.) The States' Rights Democratic Party (usually called the Dixiecrats) was a short-lived segregationist political party in the United States, active primarily in the South. It arose due to a Southern regional split in opposition to the Democratic Party. After President Harry S. Truman, a member of the Democratic Party, ordered integration of the military in 1948 and other actions to address civil rights of African Americans, many Southern conservative white politicians who objected to this course organized themselves as a breakaway faction. The Dixiecrats were determined to protect Southern states' rights to maintain racial segregation. (en)
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