District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), is a landmark case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to keep and bear arms, unconnected with service in a militia, for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that the District of Columbia's handgun ban and requirement that lawfully owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee. It also stated that the right to bear arms is not unlimited and that guns and gun ownership would continue to be regulated. It was the first Supreme Court case to decide whether the Second Amendment protects an individual right to keep and bear arms for self-defense or if the right was inte

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), is a landmark case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to keep and bear arms, unconnected with service in a militia, for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that the District of Columbia's handgun ban and requirement that lawfully owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee. It also stated that the right to bear arms is not unlimited and that guns and gun ownership would continue to be regulated. It was the first Supreme Court case to decide whether the Second Amendment protects an individual right to keep and bear arms for self-defense or if the right was intended for state militias. Because of the District of Columbia's status as a federal enclave (it is not in any state), the decision did not address the question of whether the Second Amendment's protections are incorporated by the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment against the states. This point was addressed two years later by McDonald v. City of Chicago (2010), in which it was found that they are. On June 26, 2008, the Supreme Court affirmed by a vote of 5 to 4 the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in Heller v. District of Columbia. The Supreme Court struck down provisions of the Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975 as unconstitutional, determined that handguns are "arms" for the purposes of the Second Amendment, found that the Regulations Act was an unconstitutional ban, and struck down the portion of the Regulations Act that requires all firearms including rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock". Prior to this decision the Firearms Control Regulation Act of 1975 also restricted residents from owning handguns except for those registered prior to 1975. (en)
  • District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), was a landmark decision of the US Supreme Court ruling that the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to keep and bear arms, unconnected with service in a militia, for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that the District of Columbia's handgun ban and requirement that lawfully owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee. It also stated that the right to bear arms is not unlimited and that guns and gun ownership would continue to be regulated. It was the first Supreme Court case to decide whether the Second Amendment protects an individual right to keep and bear arms for self-defense or if the right was intended for state militias. Because of the District of Columbia's status as a federal enclave (it is not in any state), the decision did not address the question of whether the Second Amendment's protections are incorporated by the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment against the states. This point was addressed two years later by McDonald v. City of Chicago (2010), in which it was found that they are. On June 26, 2008, the Supreme Court affirmed by a vote of 5 to 4 the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in Heller v. District of Columbia. The Supreme Court struck down provisions of the Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975 as unconstitutional, determined that handguns are "arms" for the purposes of the Second Amendment, found that the Regulations Act was an unconstitutional ban, and struck down the portion of the Regulations Act that requires all firearms including rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock". Prior to this decision the Firearms Control Regulation Act of 1975 also restricted residents from owning handguns except for those registered prior to 1975. (en)
  • rms for self-defense or if the right was intended for state militias. Because of the District of Columbia's status as a federal enclave (it is not in any state), the decision did not address the question of whether the Second Amendment's protections are incorporated by theri Denied p.2]; Court: A constitutional right to a gun</ref> The Supreme Court struck down provisions of the Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975 as unconstitutional, determined that handguns are "arms" for the purposes of the Second Amendment, found that the Regulations Act was an unconstitutional ban, and struck down the portion of the Regulations Act that requires all firearms including rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock". Prior to this decision the Firearms Control Regulation Act of 1975 also restricted residents from owning handguns except for those registered prior to 1975. (en)
  • District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), was a landmark decision of the US Supreme Court ruling that the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to keep and bear arms, unconnected with service in a militia, for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that the District of Columbia's handgun ban and requirement that lawfully owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee. It also stated that the right to bear arms is not unlimited and that guns and gun ownership would continue to be regulated. It was the first Supreme Court case to decide whether the Second Amendment protects an individual right to keep and bear arms for self-defense or if the right was intended for state militias. District of Columbia's status as a federal enclave (it is not in any state), the decision did not address the question of whether the Second Amendment's protections are incorporated by the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment against the states. This point was addressed two years later by McDonald v. City of Chicago (2010), in which it was found that they are. On June 26, 2008, the Supreme Court affirmed by a vote of 5 to 4 the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in Heller v. District of Columbia. The Supreme Court struck down provisions of the Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975 as unconstitutional, determined that handguns are "arms" for the purposes of the Second Amendment, found that the Regulations Act was an unconstitutional ban, and struck down the portion of the Regulations Act that requires all firearms including rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock". Prior to this decision the Firearms Control Regulation Act of 1975 also restricted residents from owning handguns except for those registered prior to 1975. (en)
  • District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), was a landmark decision of the US Supreme Court ruling that the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution protects an individual's right to keep and bear arms, unconnected with service in a militia, for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that the District of Columbia's handgun ban and requirement that lawfully owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee. It also stated that the right to bear arms is not unlimited and that guns and gun ownership would continue to be regulated. It was the first Supreme Court case to decide whether the Second Amendment protects an individual right to keep and bear arms for self-defense or if the right was intended for state militias. Because of the District of Columbia's status as a federal enclave (it is not in any state), the decision did not address the question of whether the Second Amendment's protections are incorporated by the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment against the states. This point was addressed two years later by McDonald v. City of Chicago (2010), in which it was found that they are. On June 26, 2008, the Supreme Court affirmed by a vote of 5 to 4 the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in Heller v. District of Columbia. The Supreme Court struck down provisions of the Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975 as unconstitutional, determined that handguns are "arms" for the purposes of the Second Amendment, found that the Regulations Act was an unconstitutional ban, and struck down the portion of the Regulations Act that requires all firearms including rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock". Prior to this decision the Firearms Control Regulation Act of 1975 also restricted residents from owning handguns except for those registered prior to 1975. (en)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-04-19 05:57:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-01 15:55:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-10 10:04:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-10 18:18:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-15 15:46:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-19 20:19:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-19 20:33:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-25 14:23:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-29 12:22:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-29 12:23:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-30 11:29:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-30 11:30:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 18:32:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 15:05:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 15:05:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 15:05:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 22:03:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 22:23:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 23:09:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 03:54:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 03:55:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 11:35:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-02 01:24:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-07 13:18:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-10 01:26:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-10 01:27:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-10 01:27:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-10 07:27:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-18 21:12:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-18 22:01:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-22 17:09:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 18:53:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 19:29:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 19:36:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:13:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:14:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:15:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:16:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 07:54:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 07:59:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 10:40:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 13:45:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 18:09:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 18:09:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 18:53:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 18:53:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 19:01:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 19:34:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 20:28:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 01:28:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 01:41:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 05:44:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-24 21:40:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-20 18:22:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-28 21:17:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-10 13:59:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-27 05:27:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-04-02 13:43:55Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 9964644 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 84391 (xsd:integer)
  • 87529 (xsd:integer)
  • 87821 (xsd:integer)
  • 87851 (xsd:integer)
  • 87853 (xsd:integer)
  • 87868 (xsd:integer)
  • 87872 (xsd:integer)
  • 88633 (xsd:integer)
  • 88799 (xsd:integer)
  • 88800 (xsd:integer)
  • 88806 (xsd:integer)
  • 88818 (xsd:integer)
  • 88820 (xsd:integer)
  • 88838 (xsd:integer)
  • 88909 (xsd:integer)
  • 88910 (xsd:integer)
  • 90650 (xsd:integer)
  • 90652 (xsd:integer)
  • 90656 (xsd:integer)
  • 90670 (xsd:integer)
  • 90671 (xsd:integer)
  • 91538 (xsd:integer)
  • 91540 (xsd:integer)
  • 91556 (xsd:integer)
  • 91848 (xsd:integer)
  • 92042 (xsd:integer)
  • 92063 (xsd:integer)
  • 92064 (xsd:integer)
  • 92110 (xsd:integer)
  • 92115 (xsd:integer)
  • 92612 (xsd:integer)
  • 92626 (xsd:integer)
  • 92634 (xsd:integer)
  • 92643 (xsd:integer)
  • 92646 (xsd:integer)
  • 92650 (xsd:integer)
  • 92651 (xsd:integer)
  • 93165 (xsd:integer)
  • 94710 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-04-19 05:57:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-01 15:55:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-10 10:04:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-10 18:18:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-15 15:46:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-19 20:19:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-19 20:33:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-25 14:23:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-29 12:22:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-29 12:23:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-30 11:29:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-30 11:30:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 18:32:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 15:04:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 15:05:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 15:05:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 22:03:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 22:23:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-21 23:09:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 03:54:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 03:55:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 11:35:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-02 01:24:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-07 13:18:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-10 07:27:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-18 21:12:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-18 22:01:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 18:53:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 19:29:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 19:36:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:13:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:14:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:15:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-11 20:16:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 07:59:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 10:40:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 13:44:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 18:09:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 18:09:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 18:52:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 18:53:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 19:01:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 19:34:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-12 20:28:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 01:28:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 01:41:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 05:44:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-24 21:40:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-20 18:21:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-28 21:16:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-10 13:59:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-27 05:27:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-04-02 13:43:51Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 180 (xsd:integer)
  • 194 (xsd:integer)
  • 202 (xsd:integer)
  • 203 (xsd:integer)
  • 204 (xsd:integer)
  • 206 (xsd:integer)
  • 207 (xsd:integer)
  • 214 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 951844910 (xsd:integer)
  • 954277794 (xsd:integer)
  • 955886578 (xsd:integer)
  • 955952088 (xsd:integer)
  • 962706757 (xsd:integer)
  • 968504845 (xsd:integer)
  • 968507159 (xsd:integer)
  • 980263565 (xsd:integer)
  • 980949388 (xsd:integer)
  • 980949476 (xsd:integer)
  • 981117803 (xsd:integer)
  • 981117844 (xsd:integer)
  • 983696264 (xsd:integer)
  • 984694155 (xsd:integer)
  • 984694209 (xsd:integer)
  • 984694222 (xsd:integer)
  • 984753707 (xsd:integer)
  • 984755949 (xsd:integer)
  • 984761473 (xsd:integer)
  • 984792744 (xsd:integer)
  • 984792889 (xsd:integer)
  • 984834812 (xsd:integer)
  • 986629024 (xsd:integer)
  • 987500742 (xsd:integer)
  • 993373681 (xsd:integer)
  • 995031987 (xsd:integer)
  • 995038583 (xsd:integer)
  • 999741234 (xsd:integer)
  • 999747145 (xsd:integer)
  • 999748373 (xsd:integer)
  • 999755029 (xsd:integer)
  • 999755211 (xsd:integer)
  • 999755348 (xsd:integer)
  • 999755494 (xsd:integer)
  • 999852885 (xsd:integer)
  • 999869969 (xsd:integer)
  • 999892997 (xsd:integer)
  • 999934849 (xsd:integer)
  • 999934918 (xsd:integer)
  • 999941999 (xsd:integer)
  • 999942042 (xsd:integer)
  • 999943274 (xsd:integer)
  • 999948868 (xsd:integer)
  • 999958092 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000004736 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000006758 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000035444 (xsd:integer)
  • 1002528001 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007935881 (xsd:integer)
  • 1009487701 (xsd:integer)
  • 1011362739 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014456339 (xsd:integer)
  • 1015613136 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), is a landmark case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to keep and bear arms, unconnected with service in a militia, for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that the District of Columbia's handgun ban and requirement that lawfully owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee. It also stated that the right to bear arms is not unlimited and that guns and gun ownership would continue to be regulated. It was the first Supreme Court case to decide whether the Second Amendment protects an individual right to keep and bear arms for self-defense or if the right was inte (en)
  • District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), was a landmark decision of the US Supreme Court ruling that the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to keep and bear arms, unconnected with service in a militia, for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that the District of Columbia's handgun ban and requirement that lawfully owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee. It also stated that the right to bear arms is not unlimited and that guns and gun ownership would continue to be regulated. It was the first Supreme Court case to decide whether the Second Amendment protects an individual right to keep and bear arms for self-defense or if the right was intended for state mi (en)
  • rms for self-defense or if the right was intended for state militias. Because of the District of Columbia's status as a federal enclave (it is not in any state), the decision did not address the question of whether the Second Amendment's protections are incorporated by theri Denied p.2]; Court: A constitutional right to a gun</ref> The Supreme Court struck down provisions of the Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975 as unconstitutional, determined that handguns are "arms" for the purposes of the Second Amendment, found that the Regulations Act was an unconstitutional ban, and struck down the portion of the Regulations Act that requires all firearms including rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock". Prior to this decision the Firearms Control Re (en)
  • District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), was a landmark decision of the US Supreme Court ruling that the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution protects an individual's right to keep and bear arms, unconnected with service in a militia, for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that the District of Columbia's handgun ban and requirement that lawfully owned rifles and shotguns be kept "unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock" violated this guarantee. It also stated that the right to bear arms is not unlimited and that guns and gun ownership would continue to be regulated. It was the first Supreme Court case to decide whether the Second Amendment protects an individual right to keep and bear arms for self-defense or if t (en)
rdfs:label
  • District of Columbia v. Heller (en)
rdfs:seeAlso
owl:sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • District of Columbia, et al. v. Dick Anthony Heller (en)
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of