A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who hosts recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ or a laptop. The title "DJ" is often used by DJs in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names.

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  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who hosts recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ or a laptop. The title "DJ" is often used by DJs in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • DJ("DJs" redirects here. For other uses, see DJS.) ("DJ" and "Deejay" redirect here. For other uses, see DJ (disambiguation) and Deejay (disambiguation).) A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who hosts recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ or a laptop. The title "DJ" is often used by DJs in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who hosts recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ or a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to perform at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • tj("DJs" redirects here. For other uses, see DJS.) ("DJ" and "Deejay" redirect here. For other uses, see DJ (disambiguation) and Deejay (disambiguation).) A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to perform at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to perform at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used Jimmy Pherrari with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to perform at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipu"disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who work at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to work at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • {{short description|Name for person who plays wii games for an world record("DJs" redirects here. For other uses, see DJS.) ("DJ" and "Deejay" redirect here. For other uses, see DJ (disambiguation) and Deejay (disambiguation).) A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who work at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to work at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • Name for person who plays wii games for an world record("DJs" redirects here. For other uses, see DJS.) ("DJ" and "Deejay" redirect here. For other uses, see DJ (disambiguation) and Deejay (disambiguation).) A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who work at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to work at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more known as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who work at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to work at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • Dj Linkboy was born in Mombasa and raised in Nairobi he is a professional dj who upload mixes of YouTube,dj Linkboy he is in all social media hundles you can contact him at +254790644026 (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings, parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, (en)
  • DJ CHADZILLA AKA CHAD IS THE BEST DJ, TIMES MAGAZINE PERSON OF THE YEAR 2006 A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • DJMACEY1 Djmacey1 DJMACEY1 DjmaceyA disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • Did you follow djmacey1? A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. The DJs main goal is to keep the crowd dancing. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A downtown Justice, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. Sin embargo, en 2021, como diferenciación del término disc-jockey o pinchadiscos surge el término denominativo disc-player (abreviado como DP) para referirse a aquella persona que en sus sesiones de reproducción de canciones no las mezcla y, por tanto, no emplea la técnica de mezcla de beats (como si la emplea el disc-jockey). El disc-player no mezclando las canciones entre ellas, tal y como su denominación hace referencia se caracteriza por únicamente pulsar la función play para reproducir la siguiente, a la finalización de la anterior. Los términos disc-player y disc-jockey posibilitan a la persona que va a ser contratada asignarse los géneros musicales que caracterizan a cada uno de estos dos términos (a reproducir en sus sesiones), permitiendo así al empresario conocerlos con exactitud (previamente a contratarla), a fin de evitar que una vez iniciada la sesión no encaje el género con el fin del evento. El disc-jockey emplea géneros musicales mezclables sus beats y a requerir de la correspondiente técnica: , hip hop, rap, reggaetón, mientras que el disc-player emplea cualquier otros géneros no mezclables sus beats y por tanto a no requerir de técnica ninguna. Las actuaciones más comunes de el disc-player suelen tener lugar en bodas mayormente. Aunque igualmente tienen lugar en bares, discotecas, terrazas y fiestas, sus actuaciones nunca lo son en estos mismos pero caracterizados por ofrecer exclusivamente música electrónica. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. En 2021, como diferenciación del término disc-jockey o pinchadiscos surge el término denominativo disc-player (abreviado como DP) para referirse a aquella persona que en sus sesiones de reproducción de canciones no las mezcla y, por tanto, no emplea la técnica de mezcla de beats (como si la emplea el disc-jockey). El disc-player no mezclando las canciones entre ellas, tal y como su denominación hace referencia se caracteriza por únicamente pulsar la función play para reproducir la siguiente, a la finalización de la anterior. Los términos disc-player y disc-jockey posibilitan a la persona que va a ser contratada asignarse los géneros musicales que caracterizan a cada uno de estos dos términos (a reproducir en sus sesiones), permitiendo así al empresario conocerlos con exactitud (previamente a contratarla), a fin de evitar que una vez iniciada la sesión no encaje el género con el fin del evento. El disc-jockey emplea géneros musicales mezclables sus beats y a requerir de la correspondiente técnica: , hip hop, rap, reggaetón, mientras que el disc-player emplea cualquier otros géneros no mezclables sus beats y por tanto a no requerir de técnica ninguna. Las actuaciones más comunes de el disc-player suelen tener lugar en bodas mayormente. Aunque igualmente tienen lugar en bares, discotecas, terrazas y fiestas, sus actuaciones nunca lo son en estos mismos pero caracterizados por ofrecer exclusivamente música electrónica. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. En 2021, como diferenciación del término disc-jockey o pinchadiscos surge el término denominativo disc-player (abreviado como DP) para referirse a aquella persona que en sus sesiones de reproducción de canciones no las mezcla y, por tanto, no emplea la técnica de mezcla de beats (como si la emplea el disc-jockey). El disc-player no mezclando las canciones entre ellas, tal y como su denominación hace referencia se caracteriza por únicamente pulsar la función play para reproducir la siguiente, a la finalización de la anterior. Los términos disc-player y disc-jockey posibilitan a la persona que va a ser contratada asignarse los géneros musicales que caracterizan a cada uno de estos dos términos (géneros a reproducir en sus sesiones), permitiendo así al empresario conocerlos con exactitud (previamente a contratarla), a fin de evitar que una vez iniciada la sesión no encaje el género con el fin del evento. El disc-jockey emplea géneros musicales mezclables sus beats y a requerir de la correspondiente técnica: , hip hop, rap, reggaetón, mientras que el disc-player emplea cualquier otros géneros no mezclables sus beats y por tanto a no requerir de técnica ninguna. Las actuaciones más comunes de el disc-player suelen tener lugar en bodas mayormente. Aunque igualmente tienen lugar en bares, discotecas, terrazas y fiestas, sus actuaciones nunca lo son en estos mismos pero caracterizados por ofrecer exclusivamente música electrónica. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. En 2021, como diferenciación del término disc-jockey o pinchadiscos surge el término denominativo disc-player (abreviado como DP) para referirse a aquella persona que en sus sesiones de reproducción de canciones no las mezcla y, por tanto, no emplea la técnica de mezcla de beats (como si la emplea el disc-jockey). El disc-player no mezclando las canciones entre ellas, tal y como su denominación hace referencia se caracteriza por únicamente pulsar la función play para reproducir la siguiente, a la finalización de la anterior. Los términos disc-player y disc-jockey posibilitan a la persona que va a ser contratada asignarse los géneros musicales que caracterizan a cada uno de estos dos términos (géneros a reproducir en sus sesiones), permitiendo así al empresario conocerlos con exactitud (previamente a contratar a la persona), a fin de evitar que una vez iniciada la sesión no encaje el género con el fin del evento. El disc-jockey emplea géneros musicales mezclables sus beats y a requerir de la correspondiente técnica: , hip hop, rap, reggaetón, mientras que el disc-player emplea cualquier otros géneros no mezclables sus beats y por tanto a no requerir de técnica ninguna. Las actuaciones más comunes de el disc-player suelen tener lugar en bodas mayormente. Aunque igualmente tienen lugar en bares, discotecas, terrazas y fiestas, sus actuaciones nunca lo son en estos mismos pero caracterizados por ofrecer exclusivamente música electrónica. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music or creates playlists for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers.He is also very good. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings, parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers. (en)
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  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who hosts recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ or a laptop. The title "DJ" is often used by DJs in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
  • DJ("DJs" redirects here. For other uses, see DJS.) ("DJ" and "Deejay" redirect here. For other uses, see DJ (disambiguation) and Deejay (disambiguation).) A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who hosts recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ or a laptop. The title "DJ" is often used by DJs in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who hosts recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ or a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to perform at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
  • tj("DJs" redirects here. For other uses, see DJS.) ("DJ" and "Deejay" redirect here. For other uses, see DJ (disambiguation) and Deejay (disambiguation).) A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to perform at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to perform at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipu"disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who work at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to work at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
  • {{short description|Name for person who plays wii games for an world record("DJs" redirects here. For other uses, see DJS.) ("DJ" and "Deejay" redirect here. For other uses, see DJ (disambiguation) and Deejay (disambiguation).) (en)
  • Name for person who plays wii games for an world record("DJs" redirects here. For other uses, see DJS.) ("DJ" and "Deejay" redirect here. For other uses, see DJ (disambiguation) and Deejay (disambiguation).) (en)
  • A disc jockey, more known as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who work at a nightclub or music festival, mobile DJs, who are hired to work at public and private events (weddings, parties, festivals), and turntablists who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
  • Dj Linkboy was born in Mombasa and raised in Nairobi he is a professional dj who upload mixes of YouTube,dj Linkboy he is in all social media hundles you can contact him at +254790644026 (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings, parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, (en)
  • DJ CHADZILLA AKA CHAD IS THE BEST DJ, TIMES MAGAZINE PERSON OF THE YEAR 2006 A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the tit (en)
  • DJMACEY1 Djmacey1 DJMACEY1 DjmaceyA disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopt (en)
  • Did you follow djmacey1? A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudo (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. The (en)
  • A downtown Justice, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music or creates playlists for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings , parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms (en)
  • A disc jockey, more commonly abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs (who work at a nightclub or music festival), mobile DJs (who are hired to work at public and private events such as weddings, parties, or festivals), and turntablists (who use record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records). Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to shellac and later vinyl records, but nowadays DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to also describe persons who mix music from other recording media such as cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ, controller, or even a laptop. DJs may adopt the title "DJ" in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. (en)
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  • Disc jockey (en)
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