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dbo:abstract
  • Die Gartenlaube - Illustrirtes Familienblatt (later Die neue Gartenlaube after 1938) was the first successful mass-circulation German newspaper and a forerunner of all modern magazines. Its complete title translates into English as "The Garden Arbor - Illustrated Family Journal", but throughout its history it was known simply as "Die Gartenlaube". It was founded by publisher Ernst Keil and editor Ferdinand Stolle in Leipzig, Germany in 1853. Their objective was to reach and enlighten the whole family, especially in the German middle classes, with a mixture of current events, essays on the natural sciences, biographical sketches, short stories, poetry, and full-page illustrations.Circulation of Die Gartenlaube increased steadily following its initial 1853 print run of 5,000 copies, reaching 60,000 by the end of its fourth year. After the magazine introduced serialized novels, its paid circulation increased dramatically, rising to 160,000 by 1863 and 382,000 by 1875. By comparison, most daily newspapers of the period had a circulation of only 4,000 copies. Since Die Gartenlaube became common family reading and many lending libraries and cafes took delivery, estimates of actual readership run between two and five million. It kept this market supremacy until at least 1887 and at one time it claimed to have the largest readership of any publication in the world.The format of the magazine consisted of 52 weekly issues, 16-20 pages each, in quarto size (242mm x 305mm). The text, printed in a Fraktur (alt Deutsch) font, was typeset with elaborate engraved illustrations and, later, with some photographs. Die Gartenlaube's masthead depicted a grandfatherly figure reading aloud to a family around a table. Between 1853 and 1880 works by prominent German writers such as Goethe and Schiller dominated its pages. Goethe was featured 75 times in print and 14 times in illustrations, and Schiller was featured 90 times in print and 15 times in illustrations. Publication of works by novelist E. Marlitt in serial form, such as Goldelse beginning in 1866, had a significant impact on the magazine's popularity and on Marlitt's celebrity. A particularly famous image by Willy Stöwer of the sinking of the RMS Titanic was published by the magazine in 1912.At the height of its popularity Die Gartenlaube was widely read across the German speaking world. It could be found in all German states, the German colonies in Africa and among the significant German-speaking minorities of Latin America, such as Brazil. Austrian composer Johann Strauss II even published a waltz dedicated to its readers, with the English title "Gartenlaube Waltz", in 1895.During its 91-year history the journal changed owners several times. By the turn of the century it had become more focused on entertainment, and in the buildup to World War I it came under the control of right-wing nationalists. These changes corresponded to a decline in its readership. It was finally purchased outright by the Nazi publishing house Eher Verlag in 1938 and ceased publication in 1944. Despite this, today Die Gartenlaube remains important for comprehensive historical analysis in many fields and is regarded as an essential source for the understanding of German cultural history. (en)
  • Die Gartenlaube – Illustrirtes Familienblatt (German: [diː ˈɡaʁtn̩ˌlaʊbə], The Garden Arbor – Illustrated Family Journal) was the first successful mass-circulation German newspaper and a forerunner of all modern magazines.. It was founded by publisher Ernst Keil and editor Ferdinand Stolle in Leipzig, Kingdom of Saxony in 1853. Their objective was to reach and enlighten the whole family, especially in the German middle classes, with a mixture of current events, essays on the natural sciences, biographical sketches, short stories, poetry, and full-page illustrations.At the height of its popularity Die Gartenlaube was widely read across the German speaking world. It could be found in all German states, the German colonies in Africa and among the significant German-speaking minorities of Latin America, such as Brazil. Austrian composer Johann Strauss II even published a waltz dedicated to its readers, with the English title "Gartenlaube Waltz", in 1895.During its 91-year history the journal changed owners several times. By the turn of the century it had become more focused on entertainment, and in the buildup to World War I it came under the control of right-wing nationalists. These changes corresponded to a decline in its readership. It was finally purchased outright by the Nazi publishing house Eher Verlag in 1938, who renamed it Die neue Gartenlaube, and ceased publication in 1944. Despite this, today Die Gartenlaube remains important for comprehensive historical analysis in many fields and is regarded as an essential source for the understanding of German cultural history. (en)
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  • Die Gartenlaube Illustrirtes Familienblatt (en)
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  • Gartenlaube top.png
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  • 2017-03-21 03:51:20Z (xsd:date)
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  • 1878-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbp:autor
  • Heide Radeck (en)
  • Hermann Zang (en)
  • Undine Janeck (en)
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  • Weekly journal (en)
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  • 1878 (xsd:integer)
dbp:company
dbp:country
dbp:finaldate
  • 1944 (xsd:integer)
dbp:founded
  • 1853 (xsd:integer)
dbp:founder
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  • Fayçal Hamouda (en)
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  • Die Gartenlaube Illustrirtes Familienblatt (en)
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  • Dissertation (en)
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  • Gartenlaube top.png (en)
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  • 200 (xsd:integer)
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  • Aachen (en)
  • Leipzig (en)
  • Coburg (en)
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  • 382000 (xsd:integer)
dbp:titel
  • "Zur Geschichte von Roman und Erzählung in der „Gartenlaube“ 1853 bis 1914. Heroismus und Idylle als Instrument nationaler Ideologie" (en)
  • Der Verleger Ernst Keil und seine Gartenlaube (en)
  • Zwischen Gartenlaube und Karl May. Deutsche Amerikarezeption in den Jahren 1871–1913 (en)
  • Die "Gartenlaube" als politisches Organ. Belletristik, Bilderwerk und literarische Kritik im Dienste der liberalen Politik 1860–1880 (en)
dbp:title
  • Die Gartenlaube (en)
  • Illustrirtes Familienblatt (en)
dbp:totalCirculation
  • max est. 5,000,000 (en)
  • min est. 2,000,000 (en)
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  • Edition Marlitt (en)
  • Roßteuscher (en)
  • Universität Erlangen (en)
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  • Die Gartenlaube - Illustrirtes Familienblatt (later Die neue Gartenlaube after 1938) was the first successful mass-circulation German newspaper and a forerunner of all modern magazines. Its complete title translates into English as "The Garden Arbor - Illustrated Family Journal", but throughout its history it was known simply as "Die Gartenlaube". It was founded by publisher Ernst Keil and editor Ferdinand Stolle in Leipzig, Germany in 1853. (en)
  • Die Gartenlaube – Illustrirtes Familienblatt (German: [diː ˈɡaʁtn̩ˌlaʊbə], The Garden Arbor – Illustrated Family Journal) was the first successful mass-circulation German newspaper and a forerunner of all modern magazines.. It was founded by publisher Ernst Keil and editor Ferdinand Stolle in Leipzig, Kingdom of Saxony in 1853. (en)
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  • Die Gartenlaube (en)
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  • Die Gartenlaube (en)
  • Illustrirtes Familienblatt (en)
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