Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism.

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  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and foundational branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on individual and economic freedom from governmental interference. It developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous centuries such as natural rights, constitutionalism and economic liberalism, in conjunction with the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Classical liberalism is characterised by its more minimalist view on the extent of legitimate concerns of governmental cohersion. Classical liberals tend to want to ideally confine the mandate of politics to defend citizen's fundamental freedoms and integrity from physical oppression and aggression, in contrast to other political ideologies insisting on governmental organisation as means of pursuing various more ambitious societal aims. Aims that classical liberals may or may not agree with, but irrespectively refers to voluntary practice. Notable thinkers whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from 20th century left-wing state interventionalist progressivism. As this statist egalitarianism increasingly transformed into social liberalism (sometimes simply referred to as "modern liberalism" in the United States), some proponents of the original ideas of classical liberalism started to identify as libertarians from the late 20th century, although the distinction if any is debatable. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and foundational branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on individual and economic freedom from governmental interference. It developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous centuries such as natural rights, constitutionalism and economic liberalism, in conjunction with the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Classical liberalism is characterised by its more minimalist view on the extent of legitimate concerns of governmental cohersion. Classical liberals tend to want to ideally confine the mandate of politics to defend citizen's fundamental freedoms and integrity from physical oppression and aggression, in contrast to other political ideologies insisting on governmental organisation as means of pursuing various more ambitious societal aims. Aims that classical liberals may or may not agree with, yet irrespectively refers to voluntary practice. Notable thinkers whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from 20th century left-wing state interventionalist progressivism. As this statist egalitarianism increasingly transformed into social liberalism (sometimes simply referred to as "modern liberalism" in the United States), some proponents of the original ideas of classical liberalism started to identify as libertarians from the late 20th century, although the distinction if any is debatable. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and foundational branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on individual and economic freedom from governmental interference. It developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous centuries such as natural rights, constitutionalism and economic liberalism, in conjunction with the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Classical liberalism is characterised by its more minimalist view on the extent of legitimate concerns of governmental cohersion. Classical liberals tend to want to ideally confine the mandate of politics to defend citizen's fundamental freedoms and integrity from physical oppression and aggression, in contrast to other political ideologies insisting on governmental organisation as means of pursuing various more ambitious societal aims. Aims that classical liberals may or may not agree with, yet irrespectively refers to voluntary practice. The ideas of classical liberalism can be traced back to 18th century thinkers such as John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. 19th century developers of classical liberalism include Alexis de Tocqueville, Frédéric Bastiat, John Stuart Mill, and Abraham Lincoln. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from 20th century left-wing state interventionalist progressivism. As this statist egalitarianism increasingly transformed into social liberalism (sometimes simply referred to as "modern liberalism" in the United States), some proponents of the original ideas of classical liberalism started to identify as libertarians from the late 20th century, although the distinction if any is debatable. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and foundational branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on individual and economic freedom from governmental interference. It developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous centuries such as natural rights, constitutionalism and economic liberalism, in conjunction with the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Classical liberalism is characterised by its more minimalist view on the extent of legitimate concerns of governmental cohersion. Classical liberals tend to want to ideally confine the mandate of politics to defend citizen's fundamental freedoms and integrity from physical oppression and aggression, in contrast to other political ideologies insisting on governmental organisation as means of pursuing various more ambitious societal aims. Aims that classical liberals may or may not agree with, yet irrespectively refer to voluntary practice. The ideas of classical liberalism can be traced back to 18th century thinkers such as John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. 19th century developers of classical liberalism include Alexis de Tocqueville, Frédéric Bastiat, John Stuart Mill, and Abraham Lincoln. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from 20th century left-wing state interventionalist progressivism. As this statist egalitarianism increasingly transformed into social liberalism (sometimes simply referred to as "modern liberalism" in the United States), some proponents of the original ideas of classical liberalism started to identify as libertarians from the late 20th century, although the distinction if any is debatable. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom, much like the Libertarian and Republican Parties today. Losing related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom, much like the Libertarian and Republican Parties today. Loosely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom, much like the Libertarian and Republican Parties today. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism, or Paleoliberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanization and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanization and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in the 1800 retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical asd is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanization and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in the 1800 retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanization and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. Notable liberal individuals whose ideas contributed to classical liberalism include John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on classical economics, especially the economic ideas as espoused by Adam Smith in Book One of The Wealth of Nations and on a belief in natural law, progress and utilitarianism. As a term, classical liberalism was applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
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  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and foundational branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on individual and economic freedom from governmental interference. It developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous centuries such as natural rights, constitutionalism and economic liberalism, in conjunction with the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom, much like the Libertarian and Republican Parties today. Losing related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom, much like the Libertarian and Republican Parties today. Loosely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom, much like the Libertarian and Republican Parties today. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism, or Paleoliberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanization and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanization and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in the 1800 retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical asd is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanization and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism has often been applied in the 1800 retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
  • Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanization and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America. As a term, classical liberalism was applied in retrospect to distinguish earlier 19th-century liberalism from social liberalism. (en)
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  • Classical liberalism (en)
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