Canadian nationalism seeks to promote the unity, independence, and well-being of Canada and Canadians. Canadian nationalism has been a significant political force since the 19th century and has typically manifested itself as seeking to advance Canada's independence from influence of the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Since the 1960s, most proponents of Canadian nationalism have advocated a civic nationalism due to Canada's cultural diversity that specifically has sought to equalize citizenship, especially for Québécois and French-speaking Canadians, who historically faced cultural and economic discrimination and assimilationist pressure from English Canadian-dominated governments. Canadian nationalism became an important issue during the 1988 Canadian general election tha

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Canadian nationalism seeks to promote the unity, independence, and well-being of Canada and Canadians. Canadian nationalism has been a significant political force since the 19th century and has typically manifested itself as seeking to advance Canada's independence from influence of the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Since the 1960s, most proponents of Canadian nationalism have advocated a civic nationalism due to Canada's cultural diversity that specifically has sought to equalize citizenship, especially for Québécois and French-speaking Canadians, who historically faced cultural and economic discrimination and assimilationist pressure from English Canadian-dominated governments. Canadian nationalism became an important issue during the 1988 Canadian general election that focused on the then-proposed Canada–United States Free Trade Agreement, with Canadian nationalists opposing the agreement - saying that the agreement would lead to inevitable complete assimilation and domination of Canada by the United States. During the 1995 Quebec referendum on sovereignty that sought to determine whether Quebec would become a sovereign state or whether it would remain in Canada, Canadian nationalists and federalists supported the "no" side while Quebec nationalists supported the "yes" side, resulting in a razor-thin majority in favour of the "no" side that supported Quebec remaining in Canada. The aforementioned version opts for a certain level of sovereignty, while remaining within the Commonwealth of Nations. The Canadian Tories are such example. Canadian Tories were also strongly opposed to free trade with the U.S, fearing economic and cultural assimilation. On the other hand, French Canadian nationalism has its roots as early as pre-confederation. Although a more accurate portrait of French Canadian nationalism is illustrated by such figures as Henri Bourassa during the first half of the twentieth century. Bourassa advocated for a nation less reliant on Great Britain whether politically, economically or militarily, although he was not, at the same time, opting for a republic which was the case for the radical French-speaking reformers in the Lower Canada Rebellion of 1837. Nor were Bourassa or others necessarily advocating for a provincial nationalism, i.e. for the separation of Quebec from Canada which became a strong component in Quebec politics during the Quiet Revolution and especially through the rise of the Parti Québécois in 1968. (en)
  • Canadian nationalism seeks to promote the unity, independence, and well-being of Canada and the Canadian people. Canadian nationalism has been a significant political force since the 19th century and has typically manifested itself as seeking to advance Canada's independence from influence of the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Since the 1960s, most proponents of Canadian nationalism have advocated a civic nationalism due to Canada's cultural diversity that specifically has sought to equalize citizenship, especially for Québécois and French-speaking Canadians, who historically faced cultural and economic discrimination and assimilationist pressure from English Canadian-dominated governments. Canadian nationalism became an important issue during the 1988 Canadian general election that focused on the then-proposed Canada–United States Free Trade Agreement, with Canadian nationalists opposing the agreement - saying that the agreement would lead to inevitable complete assimilation and domination of Canada by the United States. During the 1995 Quebec referendum on sovereignty that sought to determine whether Quebec would become a sovereign state or whether it would remain in Canada, Canadian nationalists and federalists supported the "no" side while Quebec nationalists supported the "yes" side, resulting in a razor-thin majority in favour of the "no" side that supported Quebec remaining in Canada. The aforementioned version opts for a certain level of sovereignty, while remaining within the Commonwealth of Nations. The Canadian Tories are such example. Canadian Tories were also strongly opposed to free trade with the U.S, fearing economic and cultural assimilation. On the other hand, French Canadian nationalism has its roots as early as pre-confederation. Although a more accurate portrait of French Canadian nationalism is illustrated by such figures as Henri Bourassa during the first half of the twentieth century. Bourassa advocated for a nation less reliant on Great Britain whether politically, economically or militarily, although he was not, at the same time, opting for a republic which was the case for the radical French-speaking reformers in the Lower Canada Rebellion of 1837. Nor were Bourassa or others necessarily advocating for a provincial nationalism, i.e. for the separation of Quebec from Canada which became a strong component in Quebec politics during the Quiet Revolution and especially through the rise of the Parti Québécois in 1968. (en)
  • Canadian nationalism seeks to promote the unity, independence, and well-being of Canada and the Canadian people. Canadian nationalism has been a significant political force since the 19th century and has typically manifested itself as seeking to advance Canada's independence from influence of the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Since the 1960s, most proponents of Canadian nationalism have advocated a civic nationalism due to Canada's cultural diversity that specifically has sought to equalize citizenship, especially for Québécois and French-speaking Canadians, who historically faced cultural and economic discrimination and assimilationist pressure from English Canadian-dominated governments. Canadian nationalism became an important issue during the 1988 Canadian general election that focused on the then-proposed Canada–United States Free Trade Agreement, with Canadian nationalists opposing the agreement - saying that the agreement would lead to inevitable complete assimilation and domination of Canada by the United States. During the 1995 Quebec referendum on sovereignty that sought to determine whether Quebec would become a sovereign state or whether it would remain in Canada, Canadian nationalists and federalists supported the "no" side while Quebec nationalists supported the "yes" side, resulting in a razor-thin majority in favour of the "no" side that supported Quebec remaining in Canada. The aforementioned version opts for a certain level of sovereignty, while remaining within the Commonwealth of Nations. The Canadian Tories are such example. Canadian Tories were also strongly opposed to free trade with the US, fearing economic and cultural assimilation. On the other hand, French Canadian nationalism has its roots as early as pre-confederation. Although a more accurate portrait of French Canadian nationalism is illustrated by such figures as Henri Bourassa during the first half of the twentieth century. Bourassa advocated for a nation less reliant on Great Britain whether politically, economically or militarily, although he was not, at the same time, opting for a republic which was the case for the radical French-speaking reformers in the Lower Canada Rebellion of 1837. Nor were Bourassa or others necessarily advocating for a provincial nationalism, i.e. for the separation of Quebec from Canada which became a strong component in Quebec politics during the Quiet Revolution and especially through the rise of the Parti Québécois in 1968. (en)
  • Canadian nationalism seeks to promote the unity, independence, and well-being of Canada and the Canadian people. Canadian nationalism has been a significant political force since the 19th century and has typically manifested itself as seeking to advance Canada's independence from influence of the United Kingdom and the United States. Since the 1960s, most proponents of Canadian nationalism have advocated a civic nationalism due to Canada's cultural diversity that specifically has sought to equalize citizenship, especially for Québécois and French-speaking Canadians, who historically faced cultural and economic discrimination and assimilationist pressure from English Canadian-dominated governments. Canadian nationalism became an important issue during the 1988 Canadian general election that focused on the then-proposed Canada–United States Free Trade Agreement, with Canadian nationalists opposing the agreement - saying that the agreement would lead to inevitable complete assimilation and domination of Canada by the United States. During the 1995 Quebec referendum on sovereignty that sought to determine whether Quebec would become a sovereign state or whether it would remain in Canada, Canadian nationalists and federalists supported the "no" side while Quebec nationalists supported the "yes" side, resulting in a razor-thin majority in favour of the "no" side that supported Quebec remaining in Canada. The aforementioned version opts for a certain level of sovereignty, while remaining within the Commonwealth of Nations. The Canadian Tories are such example. Canadian Tories were also strongly opposed to free trade with the US, fearing economic and cultural assimilation. On the other hand, French Canadian nationalism has its roots as early as pre-confederation. Although a more accurate portrait of French Canadian nationalism is illustrated by such figures as Henri Bourassa during the first half of the twentieth century. Bourassa advocated for a nation less reliant on Great Britain whether politically, economically or militarily, although he was not, at the same time, opting for a republic which was the case for the radical French-speaking reformers in the Lower Canada Rebellion of 1837. Nor were Bourassa or others necessarily advocating for a provincial nationalism, i.e. for the separation of Quebec from Canada which became a strong component in Quebec politics during the Quiet Revolution and especially through the rise of the Parti Québécois in 1968. (en)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-11-20 07:44:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-15 00:48:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-04 16:44:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-26 19:52:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-21 02:22:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-21 11:02:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-25 06:11:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 07:14:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 07:15:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 07:16:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 07:19:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 23:25:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 23:40:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-28 07:23:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-15 15:36:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-03 18:08:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-07 18:19:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 16:27:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 16:28:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 16:28:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 18:31:01Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 1151410 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 33656 (xsd:integer)
  • 34109 (xsd:integer)
  • 34128 (xsd:integer)
  • 34159 (xsd:integer)
  • 34173 (xsd:integer)
  • 34405 (xsd:integer)
  • 34407 (xsd:integer)
  • 34415 (xsd:integer)
  • 34429 (xsd:integer)
  • 34454 (xsd:integer)
  • 34490 (xsd:integer)
  • 34722 (xsd:integer)
  • 34750 (xsd:integer)
  • 34754 (xsd:integer)
  • 34760 (xsd:integer)
  • 34785 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-11-20 07:44:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-15 00:48:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-04 16:43:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-26 19:52:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-21 02:22:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-21 11:01:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-25 06:11:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 07:14:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 07:15:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 07:16:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-06 07:18:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 23:25:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 23:39:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-28 07:23:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-15 15:36:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-03 18:08:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-07 18:19:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 16:27:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 16:28:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 16:28:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 18:30:54Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 128 (xsd:integer)
  • 129 (xsd:integer)
  • 130 (xsd:integer)
  • 131 (xsd:integer)
  • 134 (xsd:integer)
  • 135 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 927090365 (xsd:integer)
  • 956735065 (xsd:integer)
  • 960736440 (xsd:integer)
  • 975110554 (xsd:integer)
  • 979488326 (xsd:integer)
  • 979549248 (xsd:integer)
  • 980207279 (xsd:integer)
  • 982112695 (xsd:integer)
  • 982112763 (xsd:integer)
  • 982112801 (xsd:integer)
  • 982113037 (xsd:integer)
  • 989258490 (xsd:integer)
  • 989260153 (xsd:integer)
  • 991100186 (xsd:integer)
  • 994405800 (xsd:integer)
  • 998074473 (xsd:integer)
  • 998932920 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001838401 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001838504 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001838574 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001857830 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Canadian nationalism seeks to promote the unity, independence, and well-being of Canada and Canadians. Canadian nationalism has been a significant political force since the 19th century and has typically manifested itself as seeking to advance Canada's independence from influence of the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Since the 1960s, most proponents of Canadian nationalism have advocated a civic nationalism due to Canada's cultural diversity that specifically has sought to equalize citizenship, especially for Québécois and French-speaking Canadians, who historically faced cultural and economic discrimination and assimilationist pressure from English Canadian-dominated governments. Canadian nationalism became an important issue during the 1988 Canadian general election tha (en)
  • Canadian nationalism seeks to promote the unity, independence, and well-being of Canada and the Canadian people. Canadian nationalism has been a significant political force since the 19th century and has typically manifested itself as seeking to advance Canada's independence from influence of the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Since the 1960s, most proponents of Canadian nationalism have advocated a civic nationalism due to Canada's cultural diversity that specifically has sought to equalize citizenship, especially for Québécois and French-speaking Canadians, who historically faced cultural and economic discrimination and assimilationist pressure from English Canadian-dominated governments. Canadian nationalism became an important issue during the 1988 Canadian general el (en)
  • Canadian nationalism seeks to promote the unity, independence, and well-being of Canada and the Canadian people. Canadian nationalism has been a significant political force since the 19th century and has typically manifested itself as seeking to advance Canada's independence from influence of the United Kingdom and the United States. Since the 1960s, most proponents of Canadian nationalism have advocated a civic nationalism due to Canada's cultural diversity that specifically has sought to equalize citizenship, especially for Québécois and French-speaking Canadians, who historically faced cultural and economic discrimination and assimilationist pressure from English Canadian-dominated governments. Canadian nationalism became an important issue during the 1988 Canadian general election that (en)
rdfs:label
  • Canadian nationalism (en)
rdfs:seeAlso
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:ideology of
is dbo:notableIdea of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:ideology of
is rdfs:seeAlso of
is owl:differentFrom of
is foaf:primaryTopic of