Bullet Train for Australia was an Australian political party, registered from 2013 to 2017. It was a single-issue party campaigning for a fast implementation of high-speed rail. It advocates that the first stage of the bullet train should run from Melbourne to Newcastle via Canberra and Sydney, and be built within 5 years. The party grew out of the Bullet Train for Canberra party led by Tim Bohm, which at the 2012 ACT elections gained around 9,000 votes, representing 4% of first preference votes.The party had 18 candidates in the 2013 federal election, in the ACT, NSW and Victoria.

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  • Bullet Train for Australia was an Australian political party, registered from 2013 to 2017. It was a single-issue party campaigning for a fast implementation of high-speed rail. It advocates that the first stage of the bullet train should run from Melbourne to Newcastle via Canberra and Sydney, and be built within 5 years. The party grew out of the Bullet Train for Canberra party led by Tim Bohm, which at the 2012 ACT elections gained around 9,000 votes, representing 4% of first preference votes.The party had 18 candidates in the 2013 federal election, in the ACT, NSW and Victoria. The party was involved in Glenn Druery's Minor Party Alliance. The Bullet Train For Australia party fielded four candidates for seats in the House of Representatives in the ACT, NSW and Victoria in the 2016 federal election. On 23 May 2017, the Australian Electoral Commission approved the party's application for voluntary deregistration. (en)
  • Bullet Train for Australia was an Australian political party, registered from 2013 to 2017. It was a single-issue party campaigning for a fast implementation of high-speed rail. It advocated that the first stage of the bullet train should run from Melbourne to Newcastle via Canberra and Sydney, and be built within 5 years. The party grew out of the Bullet Train for Canberra party led by Tim Bohm, which at the 2012 ACT elections gained around 9,000 votes, representing 4% of first preference votes.The party had 18 candidates in the 2013 federal election, in the ACT, NSW and Victoria. The party was involved in Glenn Druery's Minor Party Alliance. The Bullet Train For Australia party fielded four candidates for seats in the House of Representatives in the ACT, NSW and Victoria in the 2016 federal election. On 23 May 2017, the Australian Electoral Commission approved the party's application for voluntary deregistration. (en)
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  • Bullet Train for Australia was an Australian political party, registered from 2013 to 2017. It was a single-issue party campaigning for a fast implementation of high-speed rail. It advocates that the first stage of the bullet train should run from Melbourne to Newcastle via Canberra and Sydney, and be built within 5 years. The party grew out of the Bullet Train for Canberra party led by Tim Bohm, which at the 2012 ACT elections gained around 9,000 votes, representing 4% of first preference votes.The party had 18 candidates in the 2013 federal election, in the ACT, NSW and Victoria. (en)
  • Bullet Train for Australia was an Australian political party, registered from 2013 to 2017. It was a single-issue party campaigning for a fast implementation of high-speed rail. It advocated that the first stage of the bullet train should run from Melbourne to Newcastle via Canberra and Sydney, and be built within 5 years. The party grew out of the Bullet Train for Canberra party led by Tim Bohm, which at the 2012 ACT elections gained around 9,000 votes, representing 4% of first preference votes.The party had 18 candidates in the 2013 federal election, in the ACT, NSW and Victoria. (en)
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  • Bullet Train for Australia (en)
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