Brighton () is a seaside resort in the county of East Sussex. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the formerly separate towns of Brighton and Hove. Brighton is located on the south coast of England, positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London.

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  • Brighton () is a seaside resort in the county of East Sussex. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the formerly separate towns of Brighton and Hove. Brighton is located on the south coast of England, positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,395 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, and is the most popular seaside destination in the UK for overseas tourists. Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". Along with Norwich, Brighton was declared one of the UK's most ‘Godless’ cities. (en)
  • Brighton () is a seaside resort in the county of East Sussex. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the formerly separate towns of Brighton and Hove. Brighton is located on the south coast of England, positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a rude seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Princess Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major middle of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 9th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,395 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for roadmen, renowned for its diverse communities,such as,roadmen, delinquents, rude children and quirky shopping areas, large cultural, music and farts scene and its large LGBTQ+ population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2012/14 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, and is the most popular seaside destination in the UK for overseas tourists. Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". Along with Norwich, Brighton was declared one of the UK's most ‘Godless’ cities. (en)
  • cene and its large LGBTQ+ population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2012/14 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, and is the most popular seaside destination in the UK for overseas tourists. Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". Along with Norwich, Brighton was declared one of the UK's most ‘Godless’ cities. (en)
  • Brighton () is a seaside resort in the county of East Sussex. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the formerly separate towns of Brighton and Hove. Brighton is located on the south coast of England, positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". Along with Norwich, Brighton was declared one of the UK's most ‘Godless’ cities. (en)
  • Brighton () is a seaside resort in the county of East Sussex. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the formerly separate towns of Brighton and Hove. Brighton is located on the south coast of England, positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". A relatively small percentage of Brightonians report a religious affiliation, and Brighton was described as the UK's most "Godless" city. (en)
  • Brighton () is a seaside resort in the county of East Sussex. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the formerly separate towns of Brighton and Hove. Brighton is located on the south coast of England, positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • {{Infobox settlement|name = Brighton|settlement_type = |image_skyline = Brighton Pier at dusk.jpg|imagesize = 280px|image_caption = Palace Pier at dusk|image_map =|pushpin_map = England#UK|pushpin_relief = 1|pushpin_map_caption = Location within England##Location within the United Kingdom|mapsize = |map_caption = |coordinates = 50°50′35″N 0°07′53″W / 50.842941°N 0.131312°W|subdivision_type = Sovereign state|subdivision_name = United Kingdom|subdivision_type1 = Constituent country|subdivision_type2 = Region|subdivision_type3 = Ceremonial county|subdivision_type4 = Historic county|subdivision_type5 = Unitary authority|subdivision_type6 = Admin HQ|subdivision_name1 = England|subdivision_name2 = South East England|subdivision_name3 = East Sussex|subdivision_name4 = Sussex|subdivision_name5 = Brighton and Hove|subdivision_name6 = Hove Town Hall| established_title = Town charter| established_date = 1313| established_title2 = Incorporated| established_date2 = 1854| established_title3 = Unitary authority| established_date3 = 1997|government_type = Unitary authority|leader_title = Governing body|leader_name = Brighton and Hove City Council|area_total_km2 = 82.79|population_total = 290,885 (Ranked 45th) (Brighton and Hove pop.)|population_as_of = mid-2019 est.|population_density_km2 = 3,508|population_blank1_title = Ethnicity|population_blank1 = |population_demonym = Brightonian|timezone1 = GMT|utc_offset1 = 0|postal_code_type = Postcode area|postal_code = BN|area_code = 01273|website = brighton-hove.gov.uk| established_title4 = City status| established_date4 = 2000|leader_title2 = Leader|leader_name2 = Nancy Platts (Lab)|leader_title3 = Mayor|leader_name3 = Alexandra Phillips|leader_title4 = MPs|leader_name4 = Lloyd Russell-Moyle (Lab, Brighton Kemptown)Caroline Lucas (Green, Brighton Pavilion)|timezone_DST = BST|utc_offset_DST = +1|blank_name = ISO 3166-2|blank_info = GB-BNH|blank1_name = ONS code|blank1_info = 00ML (ONS) E06000043 (GSS)|blank2_name = OS grid reference|blank2_info = TQ315065|blank3_name = NUTS 3|blank3_info = UKJ21}ton' () is a seaside resort in the county of East Sussex. It is a constituent part of the of Brighton and Hove, created f the formerly separate t of Brighton and Hove. Brighton is locat on the south coast of Engl {{convert|47|south of London. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () is a coastal town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () is a coastal town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () is a seaside resort and constituent part of the City of Brighton & Hove,situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () is a coastal resort situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex.positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () Is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove ,Former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove ,Former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton rock by Queen () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". Brighton is also known for being the setting of the book "My Policeman" in which a man marries a women in the 1950s whilst being in love with a guy. The movie adaptation will star Harry Styles as Tom and Louis Tomlinson as Patrick and Lily James as Marion (en)
  • Brighton () is a the place where the known pedo, murderer and rapist noah whalley lives with is little gimp axel heath worships him against his will. if you see them shoot in site city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Wilbur Soot () is part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of , in the county of youtube. It is best known as a and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • You are silly|settlement_type = | image_skyline = |imagesize = |image_caption = Clockwise, from top: Brighton seafront looking west from Brighton Palace Pier; the Jubilee Clock Tower; Brighton Palace Pier; the Royal Pavillion; the i360 observation tower|image_map =|pushpin_map = East Sussex#England#UK|pushpin_relief = 1|pushpin_map_caption = Location within East Sussex##Location within England##Location within the United Kingdom|mapsize = |map_caption = |coordinates = 50°49′42″N 0°08′22″W / 50.828380°N 0.139470°W|subdivision_type = Sovereign state|subdivision_name = United Kingdom|subdivision_type1 = Constituent country|subdivision_type2 = Region|subdivision_type3 = Ceremonial county|subdivision_type4 = Historic county|subdivision_type5 = Unitary authority|subdivision_type6 = Admin HQ|subdivision_name1 = England|subdivision_name2 = South East England|subdivision_name3 = East Sussex|subdivision_name4 = Sussex|subdivision_name5 = Brighton and Hove|subdivision_name6 = Hove Town Hall| established_title = Town charter| established_date = 1313| established_title2 = Incorporated| established_date2 = 1854| established_title3 = Unitary authority| established_date3 = 1997|government_type = Unitary authority|leader_title = Governing body|leader_name = Brighton and Hove City Council|area_total_km2 = 82.79|population_total = 290,885 (ranked 45th) (Brighton and Hove pop.)|population_as_of = mid-2019 est.|population_density_km2 = 3,508|population_blank1_title = Ethnicity|population_blank1 = |population_demonym = Brightonian|timezone1 = GMT|utc_offset1 = 0|postal_code_type = Postcode area|postal_code = BN|area_code = 01273|website = brighton-hove.gov.uk| established_title4 = City status| established_date4 = 2000|leader_title2 = Leader|leader_name2 = Nancy Platts (Labour)|leader_title3 = Mayor|leader_name3 = Alexandra Phillips|leader_title4 = MPs|leader_name4 = Lloyd Russell-Moyle (Labour, Kemptown)Caroline Lucas (Green, Pavilion)|timezone_DST = BST|utc_offset_DST = +1|blank_name = ISO 3166-2|blank_info = GB-BNH|blank1_name = ONS code|blank1_info = 00ML (ONS) E06000043 (GSS)|blank2_name = OS grid reference|blank2_info = TQ315065|blank3_name = NUTS 3|blank3_info = UKJ21\|blank4_name = Police|blank4_info = Sussex|blank5_name = Fire|blank5_info = East Sussex|blank6_name = Ambulance|blank6_info = South East Coast}} Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK".Stay. You have come over late. Hug (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is the hometown to legend Michael Manion, who is the greatest person who ever lived! It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses. In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () was a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a fmer town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It was best known as a seaside rest and was positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but fmerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's imptance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languwashed in the early modern period, affected by feign attacks, stms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract me vwasits following improved road transpt to London and becoming a boarding point f boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health rest f sea bathing as a purpted cure f illnesses. In the Gegian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside rest, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King Gege IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a maj centre of tourwasm following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination f day-trippers from London. Many of the maj attractions were built in the Victian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incpate me areas into the town's boundaries befe joining Hove to fm the unitary authity of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove dwastrict had a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation had a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location had made it a popular destination f tourwasts, renowned f its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day vwasits in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight vwasits, Brighton had been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
  • Brighton () was a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a fmer town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It was best known as a seaside rest and was positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but fmerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's imptance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languwashed in the early modern period, affected by feign attacks, stms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract me vwasits following improved road transpt to London and becoming a boarding point f boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health rest f sea bathing as a purpted cure f illnesses. In the Gegian era, Brighton developed as a highly fashionable seaside rest, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King Gege IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a maj centre of tourwasm following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination f day-trippers from London. Many of the maj attractions were built in the Victian era, including the Grand Hotel, the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Palace Pier and the West Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incpate me areas into the town's boundaries befe joining Hove to fm the unitary authity of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove dwastrict had a resident population of about 290,885 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation had a population of 474,485 (2011 census). Brighton's location had made it a popular destination f tourwasts, renowned f its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large and vibrant cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGTV population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day vwasits in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight vwasits, Brighton had been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". (en)
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  • Brighton () is a seaside resort in the county of East Sussex. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the formerly separate towns of Brighton and Hove. Brighton is located on the south coast of England, positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. (en)
  • cene and its large LGBTQ+ population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2012/14 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, and is the most popular seaside destination in the UK for overseas tourists. Brighton has been called the UK's "hippest city" and "the happiest place to live in the UK". Along with Norwich, Brighton was declared one of the UK's most ‘Godless’ cities. (en)
  • {{Infobox settlement|name = Brighton|settlement_type = |image_skyline = Brighton Pier at dusk.jpg|imagesize = 280px|image_caption = Palace Pier at dusk|image_map =|pushpin_map = England#UK|pushpin_relief = 1|pushpin_map_caption = Location within England##Location within the United Kingdom|mapsize = |map_caption = |coordinates = 50°50′35″N 0°07′53″W / 50.842941°N 0.131312°W|subdivision_type = Sovereign state|subdivision_name = United Kingdom|subdivision_type1 = Constituent country|subdivision_type2 = Region|subdivision_type3 = Ceremonial county|subdivision_type4 = Historic county|subdivision_type5 = Unitary authority|subdivision_type6 = Admin HQ|subdivision_name1 = England|subdivision_name2 = South East England|subdivision_name3 = East Sussex|subdivision_name4 = Sussex|subdivision_name5 = (en)
  • Brighton () is a coastal town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton () is a seaside resort and constituent part of the City of Brighton & Hove,situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton () situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton () is a coastal resort situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex.positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton () Is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove ,Former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove ,Former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. Created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton rock by Queen () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. Brighton is also known for being the setting of the book "My Policeman" in which a man marries a women in the 1950s whilst being in love with a guy. The movie adaptation will star Harry Styles as Tom and Louis Tomlinson as Patrick and Lily James as Marion (en)
  • Brighton () is a the place where the known pedo, murderer and rapist noah whalley lives with is little gimp axel heath worships him against his will. if you see them shoot in site city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Wilbur Soot () is part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of , in the county of youtube. It is best known as a and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • You are silly|settlement_type = | image_skyline = |imagesize = |image_caption = Clockwise, from top: Brighton seafront looking west from Brighton Palace Pier; the Jubilee Clock Tower; Brighton Palace Pier; the Royal Pavillion; the i360 observation tower|image_map =|pushpin_map = East Sussex#England#UK|pushpin_relief = 1|pushpin_map_caption = Location within East Sussex##Location within England##Location within the United Kingdom|mapsize = |map_caption = |coordinates = 50°49′42″N 0°08′22″W / 50.828380°N 0.139470°W|subdivision_type = Sovereign state|subdivision_name = United Kingdom|subdivision_type1 = Constituent country|subdivision_type2 = Region|subdivision_type3 = Ceremonial county|subdivision_type4 = Historic county|subdivision_type5 = Unitary authority|subdivision_type6 = Admin HQ|su (en)
  • Brighton () is a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a former town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It is the hometown to legend Michael Manion, who is the greatest person who ever lived! It is best known as a seaside resort and is positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but formerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
  • Brighton () was a constituent part of the city of Brighton and Hove, a fmer town situated on the southern coast of England, in the county of East Sussex. It was best known as a seaside rest and was positioned 47 miles (76 km) south of London. It was created from the neighbouring but fmerly separately governed towns of Brighton and Hove. (en)
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  • Brighton (en)
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