Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, specifically to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one where the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman, in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat, a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by.

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  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, specifically to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one where the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman, in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat, a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by. Critics considered the tactic intimidating and physically threatening, to the point of being unfair in a game that was supposed to uphold gentlemanly traditions. England's use of a tactic perceived by some as overly aggressive or even unfair ultimately threatened diplomatic relations between the two countries before the situation was calmed. Although no serious injuries arose from any short-pitched deliveries while a leg theory field was actually set, the tactic still led to considerable ill feeling between the two teams, particularly when Australian batsmen suffered actual injuries in separate incidents, which inflamed the watching crowds. Short-pitched bowling continues to be permitted in cricket, even when aimed at the batsman. However, over time, several of the Laws of Cricket were changed to render the bodyline tactic less effective. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, specifically created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one where the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman, in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat, a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by. Critics considered the tactic intimidating and physically threatening, to the point of being unfair in a game that was supposed to uphold gentlemanly traditions. England's use of a tactic perceived by some as overly aggressive or even unfair ultimately threatened diplomatic relations between the two countries before the situation was calmed. Although no serious injuries arose from any short-pitched deliveries while a leg theory field was actually set, the tactic still led to considerable ill feeling between the two teams, particularly when Australian batsmen suffered actual injuries in separate incidents, which inflamed the watching crowds. Short-pitched bowling continues to be permitted in cricket, even when aimed at the batsman. However, over time, several of the Laws of Cricket were changed to render the bodyline tactic less effective. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, specifically created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one where the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman, in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat, a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by. Critics considered the tactic intimidating and physically threatening, to the point of being unfair in a game that was supposed to uphold gentlemanly traditions. England's use of a tactic was perceived by some as overly aggressive or even unfair ultimately threatened diplomatic relations between the two countries before the situation was calmed. Although no serious injuries arose from any short-pitched deliveries while a leg theory field was actually set, the tactic still led to considerable ill feeling between the two teams, particularly when Australian batsmen suffered actual injuries in separate incidents, which inflamed the watching crowds. Short-pitched bowling continues to be permitted in cricket, even when aimed at the batsman. However, over time, several of the Laws of Cricket were changed to render the bodyline tactic less effective. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, specifically created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one where the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman, in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat, a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by. Critics considered the tactic intimidating and physically threatening, to the point of being unfair in a game that was supposed to uphold gentlemanly traditions. England's use of a tactic was perceived by some as overly aggressive or even unfair, ultimately threatened diplomatic relations between the two countries before the situation was calmed. Although no serious injuries arose from any short-pitched deliveries while a leg theory field was actually set, the tactic still led to considerable ill feeling between the two teams, particularly when Australian batsmen suffered actual injuries in separate incidents, which inflamed the watching crowds. Short-pitched bowling continues to be permitted in cricket, even when aimed at the batsman. However, over time, several of the Laws of Cricket were changed to render the bodyline tactic less effective. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one in which the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by. Critics considered the tactic intimidating and physically threatening to the point of being unfair in a game that was supposed to uphold gentlemanly traditions. England's use of the tactic was perceived by some as overly aggressive or even unfair. It threatened diplomatic relations between the two countries before the situation was calmed. Although no serious injuries arose from any short-pitched deliveries while a leg theory field was actually set, the tactic led to considerable ill feeling between the two teams, particularly when Australian batsmen suffered injuries, which inflamed spectators. Short-pitched bowling continues to be permitted in cricket, even when aimed at the batsman. However, over time, several of the Laws of Cricket were changed to render the bodyline tactic less effective. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one in which the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by. Critics considered the tactic intimidating and physically threatening to the point of being unfair in a game that was supposed to uphold gentlemanly traditions. England's use of the tactic was perceived by some as overly aggressive or even unfair. It threatened diplomatic relations between the two countries before the situation was calmed. Although no serious injuries arose from any short-pitched deliveries while a leg theory field was actually set, the tactic led to considerable ill feeling between the two teams, particularly when Australian batsmen suffered injuries, which inflamed spectators. Short-pitched bowling continues to be permitted in cricket, even when aimed at the batsman. However, over time, several of the Laws of Cricket were changed to render the bodyline tactic less effective. A recent example is in India's tour of Australia in the summer of 2020-21 for Border-Gavaskar Trophy, in which Australian fast bowlers regularly bowled short pitch balls at the body of Indian tailenders as well as, in the final test at Brisbane, at Cheteshwar Pujara. Some critics have noted that these short pitch balls were intentionally bowled by Australian fast bowlers to intimidate and injure Indian players. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one in which the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman in the expectation that when he defended himself with his bat a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by on the leg side. Critics of the tactic considered it intimidating and physically threatening to the point of being unfair in a game that was traditionally supposed to uphold the conventions of sportsmanship. England's use of the tactic was perceived by some as overly aggressive or even unfair. It threatened diplomatic relations between the two countries before the situation was calmed. Although no serious injuries arose from any short-pitched deliveries while a leg theory field was actually set, the tactic led to considerable ill feeling between the two teams, particularly when Australian batsmen suffered injuries, which inflamed spectators. Short-pitched bowling continues to be permitted in cricket, even when aimed at the batsman. However, over time, several of the Laws of Cricket were changed to render the bodyline tactic less effective. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one in which the cricket ball was bowled, at pace, at the body of the batsman in the expectation that when he defended himself with his bat a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by on the leg side. Critics of the tactic considered it intimidating and physically threatening, to the point of being unfair in a game that was traditionally supposed to uphold long-held conventions of sportsmanship. The England team's use of the tactic was perceived by some, both in Australia and England, as overly aggressive or even unfair, and caused a controversy which rose to such a level that it even threatened diplomatic relations between the two countries before the situation was calmed. Although no serious injuries arose from any short-pitched deliveries while a leg theory field was actually set, the tactic led to considerable ill feeling between the two teams, particularly when Australian batsmen where struck by the ball, which inflamed spectators. Whilst short-pitched bowling continues to be permitted in cricket, even when aimed at the batsman, and is considered to be a perfectly legimate bowling tactic when used sparingly. However, over time, several of the Laws of Cricket were changed to render the bodyline tactic less effective. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one in which the cricket ball was bowled, at pace, at the body of the batsman in the expectation that when he defended himself with his bat a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by on the leg side. Critics of the tactic considered it intimidating and physically threatening, to the point of being unfair in a game that was traditionally supposed to uphold long-held conventions of sportsmanship. The England team's use of the tactic was perceived by some, both in Australia and England, as overly aggressive or even unfair, and caused a controversy which rose to such a level that it even threatened diplomatic relations between the two countries before the situation was calmed. Although no serious injuries arose from any short-pitched deliveries while a leg theory field was actually set, the tactic led to considerable ill feeling between the two teams, particularly when Australian batsmen where struck by the ball, which inflamed spectators. Short-pitched fast bowling in general continues to be permitted in cricket, even when aimed at the batsman, and is considered to be a legimate bowling tactic when used sparingly. However, over time, several of the Laws of Cricket were changed to render the bodyline tactic less effective. (en)
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  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, specifically to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one where the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman, in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat, a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, specifically created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one where the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman, in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat, a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one in which the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman in the hope that when he defended himself with his bat a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one in which the cricket ball was bowled at the body of the batsman in the expectation that when he defended himself with his bat a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by on the leg side. (en)
  • Bodyline, also known as fast leg theory bowling, was a cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, created to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman. A bodyline delivery was one in which the cricket ball was bowled, at pace, at the body of the batsman in the expectation that when he defended himself with his bat a resulting deflection could be caught by one of several fielders standing close by on the leg side. (en)
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  • Bodyline (en)
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