The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎ basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ) "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block.

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  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎ basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ) "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each surah (chapter) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth.It is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎ basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ) "In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each surah (chapter) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth.It is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎ basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of Allah"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ) "In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each surah (chapter) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth.It is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each surah (chapter) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth.It is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevent 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevent 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • Bismillah(For other uses, see Bismillah and In the name of Allah (disambiguation).) The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • Bismillah(For other uses, see Bismillah and In the name of Allah (disambiguation).) The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, pronounced as Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Bismillah within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Bismillah is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Bismillah is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Bismillah is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), known in Arabic by Muslims as Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of Allah"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Bismillah is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Bismillah is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Bismillah is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بسم اللہ‎, bism-allah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (nastaliq}}), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (nastaliq}}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (Arabic: nastaliq‎}}), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (Arabic: nastaliq‎}}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (Arabic: nastaliq‎}), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (Arabic: nastaliq‎}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: ‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (Arabic: تَسْمِيَّة‎}}), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ‎}}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: ‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: }, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (Arabic: تَسْمِيَّة‎‎), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ‎}}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • (For other uses, see Bismillah and In the name of Allah (disambiguation).) The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • (For other uses, see Bismillah and In the name of Allah (disambiguation).) The Basmala(Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Bismillah is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bismillah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِٱسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسۡمِ ٱللَّهِ ٱلرَّحۡمَـٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِٱسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسۡمِ ٱللَّهِ ٱلرَّحۡمَـٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, [Bismillah] ), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful."This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful."This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāh (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful."This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāh (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of Allah "), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful."This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. The Basmala is used by Muslims in various contexts (for instance, during daily prayer) and is used in over half of the constitutions of countries where Islam is the official religion or more than half of the population follows Islam, usually the first phrase in the preamble, including those of Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Maldives, Pakistan, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
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  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎ basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ) "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎ basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ) "In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎ basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of Allah"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ) "In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • Bismillah(For other uses, see Bismillah and In the name of Allah (disambiguation).) The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • Bismillah(For other uses, see Bismillah and In the name of Allah (disambiguation).) The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, pronounced as Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Bismillah is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Bismillah is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), known in Arabic by Muslims as Bi-smi llāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of Allah"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Bismillah is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Bismillah is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allāhi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بسم اللہ‎, bism-allah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (nastaliq}}), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (nastaliq}}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (Arabic: nastaliq‎}}), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (Arabic: nastaliq‎}}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (Arabic: nastaliq‎}), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (Arabic: nastaliq‎}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: ‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (Arabic: تَسْمِيَّة‎}}), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ‎}}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: ‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: }, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (Arabic: تَسْمِيَّة‎‎), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ‎}}), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (Arabic: بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ‎, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • (For other uses, see Bismillah and In the name of Allah (disambiguation).) The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. (en)
  • (For other uses, see Bismillah and In the name of Allah (disambiguation).) The Basmala(Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bismillah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِٱسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسۡمِ ٱللَّهِ ٱلرَّحۡمَـٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِٱسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسۡمِ ٱللَّهِ ٱلرَّحۡمَـٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, [Bismillah] ), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful."This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful." In Arabic calligraphy, the Basmala is the most prevalent motif, even more so than the Shahadah. In Unicode, the Basmala is encoded as one ligature at code point U+FDFD ﷽ in the Arabic Presentation Forms-A block. (en)
  • The Bismillah (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bism Allah (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful."This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāh (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of God"), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful."This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. (en)
  • The Basmala (Arabic: بَسْمَلَة‎, basmalah), also known by its incipit Bi-smi llāh (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ, "In the name of Allah "), or Classical Arabic Tasmiyah (تَسْمِيَّة), is the Islamic phrase bi-smi llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi (بِسْمِ ٱللَّٰهِ ٱلرَّحْمَٰنِ ٱلرَّحِيمِ), "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful."This is the phrase recited before each chapter (surah) of the Qur'an – except for the ninth. Muslim disagreement over whether to include the Basmala within the Quranic text, reached consensus following the 1924 Cairo Edition, which included it as the first verse (āyah) of Quran chapter 1 but otherwise included it as an unnumbered line of text preceding the other relevant 112 chapters. (en)
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  • Basmala (en)
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