Ayyappan (Ayyappa) is a Hindu God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa) is a Hindu God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse.He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa)or (sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse.He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa)or (sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • AyyappanSwami sharana Ayyappan(Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan or Swami sharana Ayyappa (Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • AyyappanSwami sharana Ayyappa(Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan or Swami sharana Ayyappa(Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Swami sharana Ayyappa or Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini, and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini, and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and sabri. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini) and Shiva. Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and sabri. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini) and Shiva. Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and sabri. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini) and Shiva. Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (vishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara Vishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . He is considered as one of the most powerful and audacious gods in Hindu tradition. The worship of Lord Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, until the expansion of Islam and Christianity reduced its worship to Southern India. While he is often renounced for being the one who establishes peace and dharma, Ayyapan is called on for many reasons - which include the removal obstacles for his devotees, granting financial success and even good health. Given the fact that the deity is a union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva, he is said to meditate along with them, as the ruler of the universe. Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. Although there is a lack of strong scriptural evidence about the existence of the deity, various scriptures discovered subsequently by religious leaders and common folk alike, have re affirmed the presence of the deity. While Lord Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. Although there is a lack of strong scriptural evidence about the existence of the deity, various scriptures discovered subsequently by religious leaders and common folk alike, have re affirmed the presence of the deity. While Lord Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. Although there is a lack of strong scriptural evidence about the existence of the deity, various scriptures discovered subsequently by religious leaders and common folk alike, have re affirmed the presence of the deity. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. While Lord Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. It is also one of the few deities that are worshipped by Muslims and Christians alike. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabarinath or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. It is also one of the few deities that are worshipped by Muslims and Christians alike. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabarinath or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. It is also one of the few deities that are worshipped by Muslims and Christians alike. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath . The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabarinath or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. It is also one of the few deities that are worshipped by Muslims and Christians alike. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath . The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Aatgiygyu Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabarinath or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. It is also one of the few deities that are worshipped by Muslims and Christians alike. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath . The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabarinath or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. It is also one of the few deities that are worshipped by Muslims and Christians alike. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath . The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. It is also one of the few deities that are worshipped by Muslims and Christians alike. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath . The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. Ayyappan may share a historical relationship with the Tamil deity Aiyanar. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. It is also one of the few deities that are worshipped by Muslims and Christians alike. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath . The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions.Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath . The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. It has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions.Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath . The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. He has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. He has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [[Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh][Telangana]]. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. He has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [[Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh] [sujeeth]]. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. He has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh]. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu traditions. He has been mentioned in various scriptures. The deity is also revered for being the one who is worshipped by all other Devas in Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in the world for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Lord Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh]. The deity is considered powerful and is a revered deity in South Indian Hindu traditions. He has been mentioned in various scriptures. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent earlier, in South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Lord Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh]. The deity is considered powerful and is a revered deity in South Indian Hindu traditions. He has been mentioned in various scriptures. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent earlier, in South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Arabic brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Lord Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh]. The deity is considered powerful and is a revered deity in South Indian Hindu traditions. He has been mentioned in various scriptures. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent earlier, in South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Arab brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered deity in south Indian Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent earlier, in South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Tamil Nadu and in Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered deity in south Indian Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent earlier, in South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Mohini (Vishnu) and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered in south Indian Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent earlier, in South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate Brahmachari God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Mohini (Vishnu) and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered in south Indian Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent earlier, in South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate (Brahmachari) God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappa (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Mohini (Vishnu) and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered in south Indian Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent earlier, in South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate (Brahmachari) God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Mohini (Vishnu) and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered in south Indian Hindu traditions. Although Devotion to Ayyappa has existed in South India for centuries but became famous only later.According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate (Brahmachari) God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Mohini (Vishnu) and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered in south Indian Hindu traditions. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent earlier, in South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikandan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabarinath. The iconography of Ayyappan depicts him as a handsome celibate (Brahmachari) God doing yoga and as an epitome of Dharma, who wears a bell around his neck. In the Hindu pantheon, his legends are relatively recent but diverse. He is honored by Muslims in Kerala, with legends wherein Ayyappan defeats and gains worship of the Muslim brigand Vavar. In the Hindu tradition popular in the Western Ghats of India, he was born with the powers of Shiva and Vishnu to confront and defeat the shape shifting evil Buffalo demoness Mahishi. He was raised by a childless royal couple Rajashekara pandiyan and Koperundevi, and grows up as a warrior yogi champion of ethical and dharmic living. In the South Indian version, Ayyappan images show him as riding a tigress, but in some places such as Sri Lanka he is shown as riding a white elephant. Ayyappan popularity has grown in many parts of India, and the most prominent Ayyappan shrine is at Sabarimala, nestled in the hills of Pathanamthitta of Kerala. The shrine receives millions of pilgrims every year in late December and early January, many of whom prepare for weeks before and then climb the hill barefoot, making it one of the largest active pilgrimage sites in the world. The pilgrimage attracts a wide range of devotees, from diverse social or economic backgrounds, except women in their fertile age because Ayyappan is believed to be the celibate deity and a plethora of other scientific arguments to vindicate the same. It remains one of the few Deities in Hindu tradition, that are worshipped by all religious communities, including Muslims and Christians in Kerala. The most significant festival linked to him is the Makaravilakku (Makara Sankranti), observed around the winter solstice. (en)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-04-14 11:50:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 08:38:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-03 14:14:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-03 14:15:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-10 01:32:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:19:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:19:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:19:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:22:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:22:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:26:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:26:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:28:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:29:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:32:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:32:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-19 11:48:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-21 02:04:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-05 19:39:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-05 19:42:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-07 05:33:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-13 17:18:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-28 15:47:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 15:46:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 15:47:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-21 18:21:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-22 08:24:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-25 20:20:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-12 07:00:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 03:42:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 05:26:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-27 08:30:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-27 08:31:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-05 02:41:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-05 02:43:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-08 11:22:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:42:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:43:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:45:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:54:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:55:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 04:33:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 04:37:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 04:52:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 04:57:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 05:01:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 05:01:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 05:11:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 12:20:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 12:23:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-18 09:27:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-18 19:34:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-18 19:37:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:41:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:43:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-23 04:07:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-23 14:38:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-24 13:04:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-24 13:05:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 06:16:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 15:25:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 04:31:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-07 08:57:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-07 08:58:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-08 15:47:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-14 05:05:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-24 18:35:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-25 06:45:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-29 17:10:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-02 10:06:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-02 10:08:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-04 03:11:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-04 03:12:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-06 07:04:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-06 18:08:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-06 18:09:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-06 18:10:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-10 14:11:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-14 14:41:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-14 14:41:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-15 16:49:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 08:43:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 09:59:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 23:48:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 23:49:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-19 15:58:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-22 04:56:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-27 11:52:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-27 21:46:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-31 15:52:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-31 15:54:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-02 10:14:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-04 18:36:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-04 18:38:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-04 18:59:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-09 05:54:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-09 05:57:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-11 19:07:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-13 22:19:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 20:27:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-17 13:50:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-19 13:45:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-19 14:21:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-19 14:22:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 07:43:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 07:43:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 07:46:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 07:55:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 17:26:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-26 13:12:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-28 16:26:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-28 16:27:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-28 16:29:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-26 07:34:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-26 07:34:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-28 02:38:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-28 17:47:57Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 100545 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 28429 (xsd:integer)
  • 28439 (xsd:integer)
  • 28440 (xsd:integer)
  • 28441 (xsd:integer)
  • 28485 (xsd:integer)
  • 28491 (xsd:integer)
  • 28492 (xsd:integer)
  • 28500 (xsd:integer)
  • 28517 (xsd:integer)
  • 28518 (xsd:integer)
  • 28524 (xsd:integer)
  • 28527 (xsd:integer)
  • 28528 (xsd:integer)
  • 28546 (xsd:integer)
  • 28547 (xsd:integer)
  • 28549 (xsd:integer)
  • 28828 (xsd:integer)
  • 28874 (xsd:integer)
  • 28875 (xsd:integer)
  • 28961 (xsd:integer)
  • 28964 (xsd:integer)
  • 28973 (xsd:integer)
  • 28974 (xsd:integer)
  • 28985 (xsd:integer)
  • 29454 (xsd:integer)
  • 29502 (xsd:integer)
  • 29504 (xsd:integer)
  • 29552 (xsd:integer)
  • 29567 (xsd:integer)
  • 29878 (xsd:integer)
  • 29884 (xsd:integer)
  • 29990 (xsd:integer)
  • 30015 (xsd:integer)
  • 30020 (xsd:integer)
  • 30030 (xsd:integer)
  • 30073 (xsd:integer)
  • 30091 (xsd:integer)
  • 30098 (xsd:integer)
  • 30100 (xsd:integer)
  • 30103 (xsd:integer)
  • 30108 (xsd:integer)
  • 30112 (xsd:integer)
  • 30117 (xsd:integer)
  • 30148 (xsd:integer)
  • 30150 (xsd:integer)
  • 30165 (xsd:integer)
  • 30172 (xsd:integer)
  • 30185 (xsd:integer)
  • 30203 (xsd:integer)
  • 30205 (xsd:integer)
  • 30212 (xsd:integer)
  • 30231 (xsd:integer)
  • 30233 (xsd:integer)
  • 30251 (xsd:integer)
  • 30255 (xsd:integer)
  • 30256 (xsd:integer)
  • 30258 (xsd:integer)
  • 30260 (xsd:integer)
  • 30261 (xsd:integer)
  • 30263 (xsd:integer)
  • 30265 (xsd:integer)
  • 30277 (xsd:integer)
  • 30294 (xsd:integer)
  • 30296 (xsd:integer)
  • 30310 (xsd:integer)
  • 30316 (xsd:integer)
  • 30320 (xsd:integer)
  • 30322 (xsd:integer)
  • 30323 (xsd:integer)
  • 30324 (xsd:integer)
  • 30328 (xsd:integer)
  • 30333 (xsd:integer)
  • 31008 (xsd:integer)
  • 31198 (xsd:integer)
  • 31200 (xsd:integer)
  • 31227 (xsd:integer)
  • 31242 (xsd:integer)
  • 31285 (xsd:integer)
  • 31289 (xsd:integer)
  • 31291 (xsd:integer)
  • 31294 (xsd:integer)
  • 31295 (xsd:integer)
  • 31296 (xsd:integer)
  • 31303 (xsd:integer)
  • 31309 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-04-14 11:50:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 08:38:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-03 14:14:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-03 14:15:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-10 01:32:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:18:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:19:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:19:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:22:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:22:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:26:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:26:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:28:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:29:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:32:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-14 17:32:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-19 11:48:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-21 02:04:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-05 19:38:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-05 19:42:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-07 05:33:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-13 17:18:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-28 15:47:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 15:46:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 15:47:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-21 18:21:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-22 08:24:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-25 20:20:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-12 07:00:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 03:42:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 05:26:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-27 08:30:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-27 08:31:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-05 02:41:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-05 02:43:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-08 11:22:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:42:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:43:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:45:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:53:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-13 13:55:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 04:33:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 04:37:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 04:52:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 04:57:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 05:01:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 05:11:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 12:20:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-17 12:23:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-18 09:27:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-18 19:34:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-18 19:37:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:41:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-21 12:43:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-23 04:07:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-23 14:38:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-24 13:04:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-24 13:05:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 06:16:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 15:25:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-26 04:31:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-07 08:57:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-08 15:47:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-14 05:05:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-24 18:35:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-25 06:45:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-29 17:10:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-02 10:06:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-02 10:08:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-04 03:11:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-04 03:12:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-06 07:04:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-06 18:08:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-06 18:09:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-06 18:10:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-10 14:11:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-14 14:40:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-14 14:41:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-15 16:49:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 08:43:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 09:59:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 23:48:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 23:48:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-19 15:57:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-22 04:56:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-27 11:51:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-27 21:45:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-31 15:51:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-31 15:54:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-02 10:13:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-04 18:36:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-04 18:38:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-04 18:59:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-09 05:54:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-09 05:56:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-11 19:07:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-13 22:18:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-15 20:27:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-17 13:50:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-19 13:44:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-19 14:21:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-19 14:22:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 07:42:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 07:46:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 07:55:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 17:26:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-26 13:11:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-28 16:26:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-28 16:27:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-28 16:29:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-26 07:34:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-26 07:34:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-28 02:38:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-28 17:47:48Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 69 (xsd:integer)
  • 76 (xsd:integer)
  • 80 (xsd:integer)
  • 82 (xsd:integer)
  • 83 (xsd:integer)
  • 85 (xsd:integer)
  • 86 (xsd:integer)
  • 87 (xsd:integer)
  • 88 (xsd:integer)
  • 99 (xsd:integer)
  • 100 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 950893067 (xsd:integer)
  • 959130853 (xsd:integer)
  • 960539482 (xsd:integer)
  • 960539680 (xsd:integer)
  • 961720743 (xsd:integer)
  • 962540975 (xsd:integer)
  • 962541061 (xsd:integer)
  • 962541075 (xsd:integer)
  • 962541408 (xsd:integer)
  • 962541482 (xsd:integer)
  • 962541983 (xsd:integer)
  • 962542011 (xsd:integer)
  • 962542348 (xsd:integer)
  • 962542410 (xsd:integer)
  • 962542847 (xsd:integer)
  • 962542868 (xsd:integer)
  • 963362814 (xsd:integer)
  • 963661179 (xsd:integer)
  • 966215956 (xsd:integer)
  • 966216486 (xsd:integer)
  • 966448977 (xsd:integer)
  • 967509225 (xsd:integer)
  • 969990004 (xsd:integer)
  • 970314758 (xsd:integer)
  • 970314864 (xsd:integer)
  • 974213774 (xsd:integer)
  • 974314256 (xsd:integer)
  • 974920010 (xsd:integer)
  • 977994947 (xsd:integer)
  • 982753793 (xsd:integer)
  • 984801292 (xsd:integer)
  • 985676114 (xsd:integer)
  • 985676237 (xsd:integer)
  • 987128588 (xsd:integer)
  • 987128856 (xsd:integer)
  • 987644951 (xsd:integer)
  • 988484649 (xsd:integer)
  • 988484711 (xsd:integer)
  • 988484993 (xsd:integer)
  • 988485967 (xsd:integer)
  • 988486177 (xsd:integer)
  • 989122130 (xsd:integer)
  • 989122527 (xsd:integer)
  • 989124022 (xsd:integer)
  • 989124503 (xsd:integer)
  • 989124910 (xsd:integer)
  • 989125921 (xsd:integer)
  • 989164183 (xsd:integer)
  • 989164405 (xsd:integer)
  • 989322295 (xsd:integer)
  • 989400672 (xsd:integer)
  • 989401006 (xsd:integer)
  • 989857802 (xsd:integer)
  • 989858087 (xsd:integer)
  • 990163374 (xsd:integer)
  • 990225287 (xsd:integer)
  • 990432473 (xsd:integer)
  • 990432525 (xsd:integer)
  • 990565741 (xsd:integer)
  • 990622069 (xsd:integer)
  • 990726097 (xsd:integer)
  • 992827367 (xsd:integer)
  • 993056308 (xsd:integer)
  • 994123072 (xsd:integer)
  • 996130709 (xsd:integer)
  • 996220921 (xsd:integer)
  • 997019491 (xsd:integer)
  • 997811322 (xsd:integer)
  • 997811552 (xsd:integer)
  • 998161871 (xsd:integer)
  • 998162086 (xsd:integer)
  • 998620979 (xsd:integer)
  • 998713714 (xsd:integer)
  • 998713982 (xsd:integer)
  • 998714122 (xsd:integer)
  • 999499531 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000292095 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000292235 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000557955 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000705197 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000713556 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000835104 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000835240 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001415845 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001966028 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003099199 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003199183 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003974699 (xsd:integer)
  • 1003975157 (xsd:integer)
  • 1004385583 (xsd:integer)
  • 1004851524 (xsd:integer)
  • 1004851830 (xsd:integer)
  • 1004855333 (xsd:integer)
  • 1005742995 (xsd:integer)
  • 1005743301 (xsd:integer)
  • 1006228644 (xsd:integer)
  • 1006626803 (xsd:integer)
  • 1006971899 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007315313 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007700296 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007705333 (xsd:integer)
  • 1007705483 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008630297 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008630615 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008631617 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008708916 (xsd:integer)
  • 1009050764 (xsd:integer)
  • 1009440363 (xsd:integer)
  • 1009440558 (xsd:integer)
  • 1009440749 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014291202 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014291237 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014609298 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014710501 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa) is a Hindu God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa)or (sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • AyyappanSwami sharana Ayyappan(Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • Ayyappan or Swami sharana Ayyappa (Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • AyyappanSwami sharana Ayyappa(Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • Ayyappan or Swami sharana Ayyappa(Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • Swami sharana Ayyappa or Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a God, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in recent times (in the late 20th century). According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini, and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini, and Shiva). Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and sabri. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini) and Shiva. Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and sabri. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabri or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini) and Shiva. Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and sabri. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini) and Shiva. Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (vishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara Vishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . Ayyappan is also referred to as Ayyappa, Sastavu, Hariharasudhan, Manikantan, Shasta or Dharma Shasta and Sabari. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Although devotion to Ayyappan has been prevalent in Kerala for hundreds of years, in the rest of South India, it has become popular only in the late 20th century. According to Hindu theology, he is the son of Harihara (Mahavishnu in the form of Mohini and Shiva) . He is considered as one of the most powerful and audacious gods in Hindu tradition. The worship of Lord Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, until the expansion of Islam and Christianity reduced its worship to Southern India. While he is often renounced for being the one who establishes peace and dharma, Ayyapan is called on for many reasons - which include the removal obstacles for his devotees, gran (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu tr (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabari or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hi (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabarinath or Manikantha) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities i (en)
  • Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabarinath or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities i (en)
  • Aatgiygyu Ayyappan (Ayyappa or Sastha or Sabarinath or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyapa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu t (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala,by members of all communities, and Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hindu (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in Tamil Nadu. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and revered deities in Hi (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [[Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh][Telangana]]. The deity is considered as one of the most pow (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [[Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh] [sujeeth]]. The deity is considered as one of the most powe (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was prevalent across the world, the early ages of expansion of Christianity and medieval expansionism of Islam confined its worship to South India. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyapa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh]. The deity is considered as one of the most powerful and rev (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Lord Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Lord Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Lord Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in [Tamil Nadu][Andhra pradesh]. The deity is considered powerful and is a revered deity in South Indian Hindu traditions. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala, by members of all communities, and in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered deity in south Indian Hindu traditions. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Lord Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Lord Vishnu and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Tamil Nadu and in Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered deity in south Indian Hindu traditions. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Mohini (Vishnu) and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered in south Indian Hindu traditions. (en)
  • Ayyappa (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Mohini (Vishnu) and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered in south Indian Hindu traditions. (en)
  • Ayyappan (Sastha or Dharmasastha or Manikandan) is a Hindu deity, particularly popular in the South Indian state of Kerala. Ayyapa is considered to be the union of Mohini (Vishnu) and Shiva. Although the worship of Ayyappa was more widespread earlier, his worship is now mainly confined to South India. Ayyappa is considered to be the ruler of the universe, and thus meditates alongside Vishnu and Shiva. He is considered to be the epitome of dharma, truth and righteousness and is often called upon to obliterate evil. The worship of Ayyappa has become very popular in the state of Kerala by members of all communities, in Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The deity is mentioned in various scriptures and is a revered in south Indian Hindu traditions. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Ayyappan (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:deity of
is dbp:primaryDeityGod of
is foaf:primaryTopic of