The Anti-Saloon League was the leading organization lobbying for prohibition in the United States in the early 20th century. It was a key component of the Progressive Era, and was strongest in the South and rural North, drawing heavy support from pietistic Protestant ministers and their congregations, especially Methodists, Baptists, Disciples and Congregationalists. It concentrated on legislation, and cared about how legislators voted, not whether they drank or not. Founded as a state society in Oberlin, Ohio, in 1893, its influence spread rapidly. In 1895, it became a national organization and quickly rose to become the most powerful prohibition lobby in America, overshadowing the older Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Prohibition Party. Its triumph was nationwide prohibition l

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The Anti-Saloon League was the leading organization lobbying for prohibition in the United States in the early 20th century. It was a key component of the Progressive Era, and was strongest in the South and rural North, drawing heavy support from pietistic Protestant ministers and their congregations, especially Methodists, Baptists, Disciples and Congregationalists. It concentrated on legislation, and cared about how legislators voted, not whether they drank or not. Founded as a state society in Oberlin, Ohio, in 1893, its influence spread rapidly. In 1895, it became a national organization and quickly rose to become the most powerful prohibition lobby in America, overshadowing the older Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Prohibition Party. Its triumph was nationwide prohibition locked into the Constitution with passage of the 18th Amendment in 1920. It was decisively defeated when Prohibition was repealed in 1933. However, the organization continued, and is today known as the American Council on Alcohol Problems. (en)
  • The Anti-Saloon League was the leading organization lobbying for prohibition in the United States in the early 20th century. It was a key component of the Progressive Era, and was strongest in the South and rural North, drawing heavy support from pietistic Protestant ministers and their congregations, especially Methodists, Baptists, Disciples and Congregationalists. It concentrated on legislation, and cared about how legislators voted, not whether they drank or not. Founded as a state society in Oberlin, Ohio, in 1893, its influence spread rapidly. In 1895, it became a national organization and quickly rose to become the most powerful prohibition lobby in America, overshadowing the older Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Prohibition Party. Its triumph was nationwide prohibition locked into the Constitution with passage of the 18th Amendment in 1920. It was decisively defeated when Prohibition was repealed in 1933. However, the organization continued, and is today known as the . (en)
  • The Anti-Saloon League was the leading organization lobbying for prohibition in the United States in the early 20th century. It was a key component of the Progressive Era, and was strongest in the South and rural North, drawing heavy support from pietistic Protestant ministers and their congregations, especially Methodists, Baptists, Disciples and Congregationalists. It concentrated on legislation, and cared about how legislators voted, not whether they drank or not. Founded as a state society in Oberlin, Ohio, in 1893, its influence spread rapidly. In 1895, it became a national organization and quickly rose to become the most powerful prohibition lobby in America, overshadowing the older Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Prohibition Party. Its triumph was nationwide prohibition locked into the Constitution with passage of the 18th Amendment in 1920. It was decisively defeated when Prohibition was repealed in 1933. However, the organization continued – albeit with multiple name changes – and as of 2016 is known as the . (en)
  • The Anti-Saloon League, now known as the American Council on Addiction and Alcohol Problems, is an organization of temperance movement that lobbied for prohibition in the United States in the early 20th century. It was a key component of the Progressive Era, and was strongest in the South and rural North, drawing heavy support from pietistic Protestant ministers and their congregations, especially Methodists, Baptists, Disciples and Congregationalists. It concentrated on legislation, and cared about how legislators voted, not whether they drank or not. Founded as a state society in Oberlin, Ohio, in 1893, its influence spread rapidly. In 1895, it became a national organization and quickly rose to become the most powerful prohibition lobby in America, overshadowing the older Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Prohibition Party. Its triumph was nationwide prohibition locked into the Constitution with passage of the 18th Amendment in 1920. It was decisively defeated when Prohibition was repealed in 1933. However, the organization continued – albeit with multiple name changes – and as of 2016 is known as the American Council on Addiction and Alcohol Problems. (en)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-03-16 15:18:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-31 12:28:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-31 13:20:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 12:13:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 12:14:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-12 22:47:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-26 14:29:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-22 18:15:02Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 948659 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 15591 (xsd:integer)
  • 15666 (xsd:integer)
  • 17040 (xsd:integer)
  • 17044 (xsd:integer)
  • 17045 (xsd:integer)
  • 17146 (xsd:integer)
  • 17163 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-03-16 15:18:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-31 12:28:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-31 13:20:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 12:13:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 12:14:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-12 22:47:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-26 14:29:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-22 18:14:56Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 55 (xsd:integer)
  • 57 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 945852579 (xsd:integer)
  • 959958165 (xsd:integer)
  • 959965151 (xsd:integer)
  • 970287038 (xsd:integer)
  • 970287149 (xsd:integer)
  • 972594558 (xsd:integer)
  • 975061628 (xsd:integer)
  • 990080313 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The Anti-Saloon League was the leading organization lobbying for prohibition in the United States in the early 20th century. It was a key component of the Progressive Era, and was strongest in the South and rural North, drawing heavy support from pietistic Protestant ministers and their congregations, especially Methodists, Baptists, Disciples and Congregationalists. It concentrated on legislation, and cared about how legislators voted, not whether they drank or not. Founded as a state society in Oberlin, Ohio, in 1893, its influence spread rapidly. In 1895, it became a national organization and quickly rose to become the most powerful prohibition lobby in America, overshadowing the older Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Prohibition Party. Its triumph was nationwide prohibition l (en)
  • The Anti-Saloon League, now known as the American Council on Addiction and Alcohol Problems, is an organization of temperance movement that lobbied for prohibition in the United States in the early 20th century. However, the organization continued – albeit with multiple name changes – and as of 2016 is known as the American Council on Addiction and Alcohol Problems. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Anti-Saloon League (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:knownFor of
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of