The Anti-Defamation League (ADL; formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith) is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL; formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith) is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing Antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama Administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. Indeed, this stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups, such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, rightwing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Candidate Donald Trump for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 Presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid 2018 ADL publicly raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Despite the fact that ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the Administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL; formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith) is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing Antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama Administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. Indeed, this stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups, such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, rightwing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 Presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Despite the fact that ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the Administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama Administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. Indeed, this stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups, such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, rightwing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 Presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Despite the fact that ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the Administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. Indeed, this stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups, such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Differentiation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the differentiation of social discussion, and to polarise society into increasingly anti-free speech attitudes and elevated treatment to minorities" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which only extreme political positions exist because we were undifferentiated enough to invent problems when they didn't exist for anything we don't like, no matter the context. Short, US and THEM." The headquarters of ADL are located in ((New York City)).Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international criminal Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewishreligious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewishreligious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewishterror service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no Muslim or Christian has rights." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewishterror service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no Muslim or Christian has rights." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish terrorist service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no Muslim or Christian has rights." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish terrorist service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To maintain Jewish supremacy while curtailing the rights of Muslims and Christians across the world " via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no Muslim or Christian has rights." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community because of the blatant and unapologetic racism that originated within the organization. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To eliminate Islam and Christianity through media and politics. To maintain Jewish Supremacy over the masses." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community for their unwavering support of Jewish terrorism in Palestine. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States that protects the international Jewish child sex slave trade. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop Islam and Christianity" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which not a single Christian or Muslim breath the air of the chosen people." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States that protects the international Jewish child sex slave trade. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Jewish Mafia, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, the ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Religious Extremist Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • {{Infobox organization| name = Anti-Defamation League| image = ADL logo (2018).svg| size = 200px| motto = We Hate Christ | formation = September 1913 (as Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith)| founder = Simon of Trent| headquarters = New York City, New York, U.S.| type = Civil rights law| leader_title = Director| leader_name = Simon of Trent| key_people = Sigmund Livingston (founder)Esta Gordon Epstein (chair)| website = The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Religious Extremist Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • Free Palestine | name = Anti-Defamation League| image = ADL logo (2018).svg| size = 200px| motto = We Hate Christ | formation = September 1913 (as Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith)| founder = Simon of Trent| headquarters = New York City, New York, U.S.| type = Civil rights law| leader_title = Director| leader_name = Simon of Trent| key_people = Sigmund Livingston (founder)Esta Gordon Epstein (chair)| website = The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Religious Extremist Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • Free Palestine The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Religious Extremist Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • Free Palestine The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • Reject Zionist Propaganda + Free Palestine The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamaphobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international far-left Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To promote Jewish supremacy while eroding the rights of Christians and Muslims across the world " via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewishterrorist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish extremist terrorist group non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • PoggersPoggersPoggers Poggers Poggers Poggers Poggers | name = Anti-Defamation League| image = ADL logo (2018).svg| size = 200px| motto = Fighting Hate for Good| formation = September 1913 (as Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith)| founder = Sigmund Livingston| headquarters = New York City, New York, U.S.| type = Civil rights law| leader_title = CEO| leader_name = Jonathan Greenblatt| key_people = Sigmund Livingston (founder)Esta Gordon Epstein (chair)| website = adl.org}} The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies i dole=Our Mission|website=Anti-Defamation League|access-date=December 10, 2019|archive-url= 30, 2018|url-status=dead}}</ref> Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, D.C., and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the U.S. political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the farther reaches of the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's whitewashing of the crimes of Israel, and the organization's vocal opposition to the human rights of Palestinians. This stance has led many progressive organizations (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to Israeli occupation, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on the ADL's whitewashing of the crimes of Israel, and the organization's vocal opposition to the human rights of Palestinians. This stance has led many progressive organizations (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to defend the Israeli occupation, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led American leftist groups, including Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace, to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led American leftist groups, including Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace, to claim that ADL cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Some of the criticism from the left is based on ADL's support for Israel as a Jewish homeland and the organization's vocal opposition to attempts to equate Zionism, the national movement for a state for the Jewish people, with racism. This stance has led some on the American left (including some Jewish groups such as Jewish Voice for Peace) to claim that so long as ADL continues to support Israel as a Jewish homeland, it cannot credibly call itself a civil rights organization, regardless of any other civil rights positions it takes domestically or internationally. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (presumably in part because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (because its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is a far-left extremist, anti-Jewish, and anti-science hate group that promotes the vile transgender ideology and rejects biological science and reality. It is also an international cultural Marxist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." However, it has abandoned its defense of the Jewish people and now spends its time and money defending our enemies such as leftists and the mentally-ill, anti-Semitic Alphabet People. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. Abraham Foxman was the national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In November 2014, it was announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Foxman as national director in July 2015. The national chair of the governing board of directors is Esta Gordon Epstein; she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including within the American Jewish community. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by the left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including very conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports illegal immigrants and "refugees," the transgender ideology and other LGBTQ subcultures, and advocates against establishment of religion as well as against what they claim to be "Islamophobia." ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for what they claimed was him making use of anti-Semitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and allegedly bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that they claimed gave voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller—who is Jewish and the architect of the administration's immigration policy—falsely smearing him as an associate of "white supremacists." (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018 ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. Other ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has also repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronovirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018 ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL once more raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has also repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronovirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018 ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, trans rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has also repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronovirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018 ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has also repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronovirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has also repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronovirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former stance on the Armenian Genocide, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronovirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronovirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronovirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international (((Jewish))) non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the criticism of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all, except for ethnic Europeans. " via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of, as it declares and labels as, hate, as well as identifying and declaring groups it views as and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have attacked ADL as being too left, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as against Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, Right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too Left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama Administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports illegal immigrantion and Aliens gaining Citizenship, granting blanket asylum to all refugees, supporting LGBTQ issues. and while not concentrated amongst Conservatives, the ADL decries groups against or pro certain Religions, as well as those against radical and peaceful followers of Islam Islamophobia. The ADL receives criticism from all sides regarding what many think as unfair, even Censorship, practices limiting Freedom of Speech and Expression. ADL repeatedly criticized President Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as White supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, Right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too Left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama Administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports illegal immigrantion and Aliens gaining Citizenship, granting blanket asylum to all refugees, supporting LGBTQ issues. and while not concentrated amongst Conservatives, the ADL decries groups against or pro certain Religions, as well as those against radical and peaceful followers of Islam Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized President Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as White supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama Administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports illegal immigrantion and Aliens gaining Citizenship, granting blanket asylum to all refugees, supporting LGBTQ issues. and while not concentrated amongst Conservatives, the ADL decries groups against or pro certain Religions, as well as those against radical and peaceful followers of Islam Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized President Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) and decrying its civil rights agenda, which supports illegal immigrantion and Aliens gaining Citizenship, granting blanket asylum to all refugees, supporting LGBTQ issues. and while not concentrated amongst Conservatives, the ADL decries groups against or pro certain Religions, as well as those against radical and peaceful followers of Islam Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized President Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized President Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism from the left include domestic spying allegations, its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party (its CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, was in the Obama administration) which supports immigrants and refugees, transgender rights and other LGBTQ rights, and advocates against establishment of religion, as well as Islamophobia. ADL repeatedly criticized Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, for making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions, past and present, that have generated criticism, includes allegations of domestic spying, while the left criticizes the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel coronavirus the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of anti-semitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of anti-semitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish hate group based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a serial social entrepreneur, former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), is a jewish tool to stop any negative information about the jewish plan for world dominance. Any talks of jewish corruption or uncovering of their evil plan are twisted and turned against the reporter of such information and labled as anti semetic.formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good." In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL has repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations.In truth the ADL is an extreme right group designed to normalize the hatred of Muslim peoples. They would be considered terrorists if they didn't have as much political power (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021 ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-Elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, a man whos grandchildren are jewish, while he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021 ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-Elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021 ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021, ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. Led by national director Adam Joseph who oddly enough makes $700,000/year, the ADL has been extremely effective in reducing the number of race wars that occur annually. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021, ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating self determination and other forms of based, and fighting domestic chads both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which white people suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-white" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Whitesfor Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021, ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for killing rapist and murder Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021, ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, to defened their jewish buddy Leo Frank, who raped and killed a little Girl. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2018 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $75 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021, ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. It's total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021, ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded itself as an "anti-hate" organization, and adopted the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. Its total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021, ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded as an "anti-hate" organization, adopting the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. Its total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. ADL repeatedly accused Donald Trump, when he was a presidential candidate in 2016, of making use of antisemitic tropes or otherwise exploiting divisive and bigoted rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The organization continued to call out President Trump for comments and actions that appeared to give voice or support to extremists such as white supremacists, for politicizing charges of antisemitism for partisan purposes and for continued use of antisemitic tropes. In mid-2018, ADL raised concerns over President Donald Trump's nomination of then-DC Circuit Court of Appeals judge Brett Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Although ADL had for many years submitted questions to the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court and other key government nominations, the organization and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt were harshly criticized by many on the right for raising concerns in this instance, particularly with regard to abortion. Subsequently, in another move that enraged many on the right, ADL called for the resignation or firing of Trump administration official Stephen Miller, the architect of the administration's immigration policy, on the basis of his association with white supremacists. In 2020, ADL repeatedly condemned President Trump for incitement of anti-Asian American hate, as the President continued to label the novel Coronavirus as the "China plague" and both he and his supporters made use of similar characterizations. In early January 2021, ADL called for the removal of Donald Trump as President, the first time in more than a century of existence that the organization had ever made such a call. This came in the wake of the violent attack on the United States Capitol by rioters seeking to stop the certification of the election of President-elect Joe Biden. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded as an "anti-hate" organization, adopting the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. Its total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include allegations of domestic spying, while left-wing groups have criticized the ADL for its former Armenian Genocide denial, since repudiated and apologized for, and what frequently is alleged by parts of the American left to be ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 also garnered criticism from the left. On the other hand, right-wing groups and pundits, including some conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it an arm of the Democratic Party. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded as an "anti-hate" organization, adopting the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director from 1987 for more than a quarter-century. In the fall of 2020 ADL's board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and National Director for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. The headquarters of ADL are located in New York City. ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, and is also active overseas, with an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. Its total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include alleged domestic spying, its former Armenian Genocide denial, (since repudiated and apologized for), and what parts of the American left argue is the ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 left criticism. Right-wing groups and pundits, including conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it a "Democratic Party auxilary". (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is twofold: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded as an "anti-hate" organization, adopting the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". In November 2014, the organization announced that Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official who had not operated within the Jewish communal organization world prior to his hiring, would succeed Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director since 1987. The ADL board of directors renewed Greenblatt's contract as CEO and national director in fall 2020 for a second five-year term. The national chair of the governing board of directors is ; elected in late 2018 for a three-year term, she is the second woman to hold the organization's top volunteer leadership post. ADL headquarters are located in New York City. The ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, as well as an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. Its total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include alleged domestic spying, its former Armenian Genocide denial, (since repudiated and apologized for), and what parts of the American left argue is the ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 left criticism. Right-wing groups and pundits, including conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it a "Democratic Party auxilary". (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is twofold: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded as an "anti-hate" organization, adopting the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official, succeeded Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served as national director since 1987. ADL headquarters are located in New York City. The ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, as well as an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. Its total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include alleged domestic spying, its former Armenian Genocide denial, (since repudiated and apologized for), and what parts of the American left argue is the ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 left criticism. Right-wing groups and pundits, including conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it a "Democratic Party auxilary". (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is twofold: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded as an "anti-hate" organization, adopting the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official, succeeded Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served in the role since 1987. ADL headquarters are located in New York City. The ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, as well as an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. Its total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include alleged domestic spying, its former Armenian Genocide denial, (since repudiated and apologized for), and what parts of the American left argue is the ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 left criticism. Right-wing groups and pundits, including conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it a "Democratic Party auxilary". (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is twofold: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded as an "anti-hate" organization, adopting the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official, succeeded Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served in the role since 1987. ADL headquarters are located in New York City. The ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, as well as an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. Its total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include alleged domestic spying, its former Armenian Genocide denial, (since repudiated and apologized for), and what parts of the American left argue is the ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 drew criticism. Right-wing groups and pundits, including conservative Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it a "Democratic Party auxilary". (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is twofold: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." In 2018, ADL rebranded as an "anti-hate" organization, adopting the logo: "Fighting Hate for Good". Jonathan Greenblatt, a former Silicon Valley tech executive and former Obama administration official, succeeded Abraham Foxman as national director in July 2015. Foxman had served in the role since 1987. ADL headquarters are located in New York City. The ADL has 25 regional offices in the United States including a Government Relations Office in Washington, DC, as well as an office in Israel and staff in Europe. In its 2019 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of $92 million, the vast majority from contributions and grants. Its total operating revenue is reported at $80.9 million. ADL has been criticized both from the right and left of the US political spectrum, including from within the American Jewish community. ADL positions and actions that have generated criticism include alleged domestic spying, its former Armenian Genocide denial, (since repudiated and apologized for), and what parts of the American left argue is the ADL's conflation of opposition to Israel with antisemitism. ADL's support for the Trump Administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 drew criticism. Right-wing groups and pundits, including right-wing Jewish groups, have criticized ADL as being too left-wing, labeling it a "Democratic Party auxilary". (en)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-04-28 05:17:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 11:55:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 12:11:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:30:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:30:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:43:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:45:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:50:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:51:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:56:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:58:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:59:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 16:01:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 14:01:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 14:12:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-01 12:15:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-01 12:16:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-01 12:16:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-02 15:26:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-02 15:32:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-04 18:58:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-04 18:59:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-05 15:58:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-05 15:59:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-05 16:08:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:46:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:47:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:48:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:49:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:52:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:54:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:55:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:55:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:56:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-12 14:51:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-12 14:51:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-12 14:54:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:06:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:32:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:32:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:34:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:35:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:35:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:36:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:36:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:37:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:38:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:39:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:39:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:41:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:42:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:43:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:43:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:44:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:44:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:46:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:47:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:52:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:53:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:54:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:54:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:59:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:59:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:00:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:01:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:01:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:02:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:02:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 20:24:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-19 23:58:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:09:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:13:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:16:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:18:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:19:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-21 22:22:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-21 22:30:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-23 21:24:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-23 21:24:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-24 01:32:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:40:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:43:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:44:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:55:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:57:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:58:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:02:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:04:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:05:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:07:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:11:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:11:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:14:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:15:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:16:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:17:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:18:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:19:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:20:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:21:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:22:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:23:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-04 04:33:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-09 04:44:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-09 17:26:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-12 10:34:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-16 15:29:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-16 15:43:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-17 10:21:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-17 10:22:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-19 00:44:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 07:27:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-10 03:09:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-14 07:00:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-14 07:19:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 21:35:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 21:38:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 21:38:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 21:39:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 21:53:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 22:00:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-17 05:23:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-20 03:12:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-25 08:34:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-25 08:35:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-26 10:41:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-26 10:43:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-26 10:46:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-27 00:37:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-27 00:38:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-27 00:40:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-27 00:41:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-27 00:41:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 23:06:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 01:48:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 01:48:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 23:28:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 23:29:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 23:52:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-01 21:18:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:27:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:29:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:38:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:39:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:41:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:45:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:53:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-09 09:14:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-09 15:11:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-09 15:12:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-09 18:11:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-19 14:10:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-19 14:14:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-19 15:50:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-23 01:20:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-27 04:57:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-27 18:22:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-28 05:26:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-03 16:29:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-05 01:32:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-05 04:03:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 23:50:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-11 00:07:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-11 12:58:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-15 03:43:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-15 03:48:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-23 03:49:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 11:30:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 11:38:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 11:38:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 11:52:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:26:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:40:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:46:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:47:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:48:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 13:34:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 08:48:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 08:49:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 08:50:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 08:51:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 10:23:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 10:25:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 12:01:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 22:17:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 23:18:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 23:36:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 23:38:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-11 07:44:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-11 07:45:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:00:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:20:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:33:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:34:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:37:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:38:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:42:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:43:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:54:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:55:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 16:32:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 05:54:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:13:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:14:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:15:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:17:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:30:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 15:02:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-16 07:08:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-16 07:08:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-16 07:51:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-16 18:28:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-16 18:33:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 19:50:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 05:24:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 05:52:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 06:01:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 09:20:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 09:22:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 09:24:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 09:28:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 12:51:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-27 01:58:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-29 03:51:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-29 03:55:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-29 05:35:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-30 00:54:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-04 21:23:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-05 04:58:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-11 14:47:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-11 16:49:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-16 08:30:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-16 09:13:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-23 21:38:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-23 21:58:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 07:52:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 07:58:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 07:59:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 08:00:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-27 03:20:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-14 07:25:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-14 07:26:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-15 03:38:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-15 15:33:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-19 16:30:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-19 16:31:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-25 21:00:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-25 21:00:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-25 21:31:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-30 17:27:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-30 17:27:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-31 07:55:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-08 04:31:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-08 18:30:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 06:54:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 06:57:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 23:02:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-14 00:48:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 04:23:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 12:45:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-17 07:33:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-20 13:24:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-20 13:24:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 00:42:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-01 14:42:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-10 04:07:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-10 04:09:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-10 04:54:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-10 04:55:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-10 06:00:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-23 15:53:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 15:57:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 15:59:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 16:01:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 16:11:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 16:13:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 15:32:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 15:33:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 15:36:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 15:36:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 19:09:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 19:09:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 19:10:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-20 03:13:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 02:17:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 02:48:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 02:53:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:06:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:25:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:26:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:36:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:39:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:41:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 00:01:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 00:13:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 01:49:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 01:54:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 01:54:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 15:00:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 15:10:21Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 27243620 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 95575 (xsd:integer)
  • 95638 (xsd:integer)
  • 95656 (xsd:integer)
  • 95672 (xsd:integer)
  • 95966 (xsd:integer)
  • 96003 (xsd:integer)
  • 96164 (xsd:integer)
  • 96191 (xsd:integer)
  • 96216 (xsd:integer)
  • 96569 (xsd:integer)
  • 96765 (xsd:integer)
  • 96786 (xsd:integer)
  • 97000 (xsd:integer)
  • 97299 (xsd:integer)
  • 97461 (xsd:integer)
  • 97485 (xsd:integer)
  • 97496 (xsd:integer)
  • 97498 (xsd:integer)
  • 97826 (xsd:integer)
  • 97880 (xsd:integer)
  • 97886 (xsd:integer)
  • 97898 (xsd:integer)
  • 97899 (xsd:integer)
  • 97900 (xsd:integer)
  • 97907 (xsd:integer)
  • 97953 (xsd:integer)
  • 98029 (xsd:integer)
  • 98034 (xsd:integer)
  • 98038 (xsd:integer)
  • 98049 (xsd:integer)
  • 98052 (xsd:integer)
  • 98055 (xsd:integer)
  • 98058 (xsd:integer)
  • 98060 (xsd:integer)
  • 98065 (xsd:integer)
  • 98066 (xsd:integer)
  • 98070 (xsd:integer)
  • 98077 (xsd:integer)
  • 98078 (xsd:integer)
  • 98080 (xsd:integer)
  • 98082 (xsd:integer)
  • 98083 (xsd:integer)
  • 98084 (xsd:integer)
  • 98086 (xsd:integer)
  • 98087 (xsd:integer)
  • 98089 (xsd:integer)
  • 98090 (xsd:integer)
  • 98091 (xsd:integer)
  • 98095 (xsd:integer)
  • 98108 (xsd:integer)
  • 98125 (xsd:integer)
  • 98127 (xsd:integer)
  • 98129 (xsd:integer)
  • 98147 (xsd:integer)
  • 98150 (xsd:integer)
  • 98165 (xsd:integer)
  • 98169 (xsd:integer)
  • 98174 (xsd:integer)
  • 98175 (xsd:integer)
  • 98177 (xsd:integer)
  • 98179 (xsd:integer)
  • 98180 (xsd:integer)
  • 98182 (xsd:integer)
  • 98184 (xsd:integer)
  • 98204 (xsd:integer)
  • 98255 (xsd:integer)
  • 98266 (xsd:integer)
  • 98269 (xsd:integer)
  • 98270 (xsd:integer)
  • 98282 (xsd:integer)
  • 98295 (xsd:integer)
  • 98390 (xsd:integer)
  • 98444 (xsd:integer)
  • 98446 (xsd:integer)
  • 98456 (xsd:integer)
  • 98513 (xsd:integer)
  • 98518 (xsd:integer)
  • 98523 (xsd:integer)
  • 98609 (xsd:integer)
  • 98759 (xsd:integer)
  • 98764 (xsd:integer)
  • 98777 (xsd:integer)
  • 98788 (xsd:integer)
  • 98797 (xsd:integer)
  • 98804 (xsd:integer)
  • 98805 (xsd:integer)
  • 98806 (xsd:integer)
  • 98810 (xsd:integer)
  • 98817 (xsd:integer)
  • 98822 (xsd:integer)
  • 98826 (xsd:integer)
  • 98903 (xsd:integer)
  • 98979 (xsd:integer)
  • 98994 (xsd:integer)
  • 99056 (xsd:integer)
  • 99063 (xsd:integer)
  • 99084 (xsd:integer)
  • 99086 (xsd:integer)
  • 99088 (xsd:integer)
  • 99319 (xsd:integer)
  • 100153 (xsd:integer)
  • 101195 (xsd:integer)
  • 101211 (xsd:integer)
  • 101216 (xsd:integer)
  • 101217 (xsd:integer)
  • 101544 (xsd:integer)
  • 101568 (xsd:integer)
  • 101771 (xsd:integer)
  • 101774 (xsd:integer)
  • 101787 (xsd:integer)
  • 101788 (xsd:integer)
  • 101815 (xsd:integer)
  • 101828 (xsd:integer)
  • 102152 (xsd:integer)
  • 102560 (xsd:integer)
  • 102564 (xsd:integer)
  • 102707 (xsd:integer)
  • 102708 (xsd:integer)
  • 102711 (xsd:integer)
  • 102712 (xsd:integer)
  • 102817 (xsd:integer)
  • 102858 (xsd:integer)
  • 102861 (xsd:integer)
  • 102912 (xsd:integer)
  • 102951 (xsd:integer)
  • 102969 (xsd:integer)
  • 102987 (xsd:integer)
  • 103019 (xsd:integer)
  • 103060 (xsd:integer)
  • 103071 (xsd:integer)
  • 103079 (xsd:integer)
  • 103091 (xsd:integer)
  • 103095 (xsd:integer)
  • 103100 (xsd:integer)
  • 103177 (xsd:integer)
  • 103178 (xsd:integer)
  • 103230 (xsd:integer)
  • 103348 (xsd:integer)
  • 103533 (xsd:integer)
  • 103539 (xsd:integer)
  • 103612 (xsd:integer)
  • 103825 (xsd:integer)
  • 103830 (xsd:integer)
  • 103831 (xsd:integer)
  • 103839 (xsd:integer)
  • 103888 (xsd:integer)
  • 104031 (xsd:integer)
  • 104042 (xsd:integer)
  • 104126 (xsd:integer)
  • 105098 (xsd:integer)
  • 105105 (xsd:integer)
  • 105107 (xsd:integer)
  • 105116 (xsd:integer)
  • 105164 (xsd:integer)
  • 105229 (xsd:integer)
  • 105282 (xsd:integer)
  • 105351 (xsd:integer)
  • 105608 (xsd:integer)
  • 105638 (xsd:integer)
  • 105702 (xsd:integer)
  • 105704 (xsd:integer)
  • 105712 (xsd:integer)
  • 105718 (xsd:integer)
  • 105722 (xsd:integer)
  • 105727 (xsd:integer)
  • 105728 (xsd:integer)
  • 105737 (xsd:integer)
  • 105743 (xsd:integer)
  • 105751 (xsd:integer)
  • 105752 (xsd:integer)
  • 105756 (xsd:integer)
  • 105770 (xsd:integer)
  • 105771 (xsd:integer)
  • 105784 (xsd:integer)
  • 105791 (xsd:integer)
  • 105822 (xsd:integer)
  • 105941 (xsd:integer)
  • 106004 (xsd:integer)
  • 106006 (xsd:integer)
  • 106910 (xsd:integer)
  • 106958 (xsd:integer)
  • 107242 (xsd:integer)
  • 107258 (xsd:integer)
  • 108444 (xsd:integer)
  • 108464 (xsd:integer)
  • 108466 (xsd:integer)
  • 108480 (xsd:integer)
  • 108483 (xsd:integer)
  • 108489 (xsd:integer)
  • 108494 (xsd:integer)
  • 108500 (xsd:integer)
  • 108501 (xsd:integer)
  • 108511 (xsd:integer)
  • 108517 (xsd:integer)
  • 108538 (xsd:integer)
  • 108604 (xsd:integer)
  • 108654 (xsd:integer)
  • 108655 (xsd:integer)
  • 108670 (xsd:integer)
  • 108693 (xsd:integer)
  • 108721 (xsd:integer)
  • 108731 (xsd:integer)
  • 108735 (xsd:integer)
  • 108742 (xsd:integer)
  • 108763 (xsd:integer)
  • 108768 (xsd:integer)
  • 108772 (xsd:integer)
  • 108820 (xsd:integer)
  • 108972 (xsd:integer)
  • 109303 (xsd:integer)
  • 109321 (xsd:integer)
  • 109325 (xsd:integer)
  • 109330 (xsd:integer)
  • 109338 (xsd:integer)
  • 109354 (xsd:integer)
  • 109375 (xsd:integer)
  • 109376 (xsd:integer)
  • 109412 (xsd:integer)
  • 109494 (xsd:integer)
  • 109500 (xsd:integer)
  • 109509 (xsd:integer)
  • 109519 (xsd:integer)
  • 109528 (xsd:integer)
  • 109535 (xsd:integer)
  • 109666 (xsd:integer)
  • 109732 (xsd:integer)
  • 109743 (xsd:integer)
  • 109779 (xsd:integer)
  • 109789 (xsd:integer)
  • 109812 (xsd:integer)
  • 109818 (xsd:integer)
  • 109820 (xsd:integer)
  • 109823 (xsd:integer)
  • 109830 (xsd:integer)
  • 109850 (xsd:integer)
  • 109858 (xsd:integer)
  • 109863 (xsd:integer)
  • 109870 (xsd:integer)
  • 109874 (xsd:integer)
  • 109877 (xsd:integer)
  • 109878 (xsd:integer)
  • 109884 (xsd:integer)
  • 109905 (xsd:integer)
  • 109947 (xsd:integer)
  • 110096 (xsd:integer)
  • 110475 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-04-28 05:17:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 11:55:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 12:11:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:30:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:30:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:43:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:45:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:50:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:51:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:56:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:57:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 15:59:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-28 16:01:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 14:01:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-04-30 14:12:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-01 12:16:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-01 12:16:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-02 15:25:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-02 15:32:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-04 18:58:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-04 18:59:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-05 15:58:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-05 15:59:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-05 16:08:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:46:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:47:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:48:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:49:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:52:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:54:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:55:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:55:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-07 19:56:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-12 14:50:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-12 14:51:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-12 14:54:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:06:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:31:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:32:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:34:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:35:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:36:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:36:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:37:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:38:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:39:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:39:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:41:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:42:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:43:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:43:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:44:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:44:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:46:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:47:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:54:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:54:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:59:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 16:59:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:00:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:01:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:01:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:02:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 17:02:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 20:24:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-18 20:24:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-19 23:58:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:08:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:13:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:16:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:18:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-20 00:19:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-21 22:22:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-21 22:30:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-23 21:24:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-23 21:24:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-24 01:32:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:40:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:42:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:44:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:55:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 16:57:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:01:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:04:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:05:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:07:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:11:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:11:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:14:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:15:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:16:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:17:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:18:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:19:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:20:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:21:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:22:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-05-27 17:23:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-04 04:33:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-09 04:44:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-09 17:26:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-12 10:34:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-16 15:29:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-16 15:43:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-17 10:21:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-17 10:22:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-19 00:43:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-06-22 07:27:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-10 03:09:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-14 07:00:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-14 07:19:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 21:38:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 21:38:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 21:39:41Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 21:53:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-16 22:00:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-17 05:23:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-20 03:12:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-25 08:34:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-25 08:35:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-26 10:43:06Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-26 10:46:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-27 00:41:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-27 00:41:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-30 23:06:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 01:47:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 01:48:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 23:28:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 23:29:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-07-31 23:51:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-01 21:18:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:27:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:29:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:38:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:39:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:41:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:45:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-06 14:52:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-09 09:14:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-09 15:11:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-09 15:12:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-09 18:11:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-19 14:10:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-19 14:13:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-19 15:50:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-23 01:20:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-27 04:57:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-27 18:22:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-08-28 05:26:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-03 16:29:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-05 01:32:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-05 04:03:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-10 23:50:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-11 00:07:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-11 12:58:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-15 03:43:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-15 03:48:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-09-23 03:49:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 11:29:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 11:38:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 11:51:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:26:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:40:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:46:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:47:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 12:48:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-04 13:34:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 08:47:56Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 08:49:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 08:50:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 08:51:28Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 10:23:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 10:25:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 12:01:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 22:17:29Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 23:18:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 23:36:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-10 23:38:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-11 07:44:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-11 07:45:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:00:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:20:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:33:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:34:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:37:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:38:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:41:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:43:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:54:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 12:55:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-14 16:32:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 05:54:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:13:24Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:14:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:14:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:17:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 14:30:30Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-15 15:02:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-16 07:08:44Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-16 07:51:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-16 18:28:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-16 18:33:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-22 19:50:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 05:24:19Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 05:52:04Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 06:01:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 09:20:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 09:22:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 09:24:05Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 09:28:27Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-26 12:51:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-27 01:57:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-29 03:51:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-29 03:55:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-29 05:35:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-10-30 00:53:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-04 21:22:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-05 04:58:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-11 14:47:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-11 16:49:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-16 08:30:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-16 09:13:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-23 21:38:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-23 21:58:31Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 07:52:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 07:58:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 07:59:12Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-25 08:00:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-11-27 03:20:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-14 07:25:13Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-14 07:25:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-15 03:38:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-15 15:33:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-19 16:30:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-19 16:30:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-25 21:00:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-25 21:31:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-30 17:27:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-30 17:27:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2020-12-31 07:55:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-08 04:31:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-08 18:30:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 06:54:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 06:57:46Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-13 23:02:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-14 00:48:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 04:23:48Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-16 12:45:23Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-17 07:33:21Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-20 13:23:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-20 13:24:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-01-21 00:42:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-01 14:42:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-10 04:07:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-10 04:09:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-10 04:54:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-10 06:00:38Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-23 15:53:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 15:57:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 15:59:49Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 16:01:42Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 16:11:34Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-02-24 16:13:11Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 06:55:57Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 15:33:25Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 15:36:00Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-04 15:36:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-20 03:13:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 02:17:37Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 02:48:36Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 02:52:59Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:05:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:25:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:26:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:36:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:39:26Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-23 14:40:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 00:00:50Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 00:13:40Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 01:49:51Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 01:54:16Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 01:54:43Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 15:00:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 15:10:10Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 15:12:22Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 15:36:15Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 15:51:02Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 16:08:53Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 16:15:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 16:18:20Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 16:30:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 16:40:18Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 16:40:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 17:37:52Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 18:22:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 18:25:58Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 20:26:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-24 23:45:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-25 13:05:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2021-03-26 03:06:38Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 221 (xsd:integer)
  • 222 (xsd:integer)
  • 223 (xsd:integer)
  • 224 (xsd:integer)
  • 225 (xsd:integer)
  • 226 (xsd:integer)
  • 227 (xsd:integer)
  • 228 (xsd:integer)
  • 229 (xsd:integer)
  • 231 (xsd:integer)
  • 232 (xsd:integer)
  • 234 (xsd:integer)
  • 235 (xsd:integer)
  • 236 (xsd:integer)
  • 237 (xsd:integer)
  • 238 (xsd:integer)
  • 239 (xsd:integer)
  • 243 (xsd:integer)
  • 246 (xsd:integer)
  • 247 (xsd:integer)
  • 249 (xsd:integer)
  • 250 (xsd:integer)
  • 251 (xsd:integer)
  • 252 (xsd:integer)
  • 253 (xsd:integer)
  • 254 (xsd:integer)
  • 255 (xsd:integer)
  • 256 (xsd:integer)
  • 257 (xsd:integer)
  • 259 (xsd:integer)
  • 260 (xsd:integer)
  • 261 (xsd:integer)
  • 262 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 953622168 (xsd:integer)
  • 953662720 (xsd:integer)
  • 953664302 (xsd:integer)
  • 953691466 (xsd:integer)
  • 953691552 (xsd:integer)
  • 953693786 (xsd:integer)
  • 953693992 (xsd:integer)
  • 953694639 (xsd:integer)
  • 953694804 (xsd:integer)
  • 953695396 (xsd:integer)
  • 953695668 (xsd:integer)
  • 953695844 (xsd:integer)
  • 953696186 (xsd:integer)
  • 954065145 (xsd:integer)
  • 954066865 (xsd:integer)
  • 954246714 (xsd:integer)
  • 954246764 (xsd:integer)
  • 954467204 (xsd:integer)
  • 954468238 (xsd:integer)
  • 954872884 (xsd:integer)
  • 954873062 (xsd:integer)
  • 955033240 (xsd:integer)
  • 955033298 (xsd:integer)
  • 955034665 (xsd:integer)
  • 955432782 (xsd:integer)
  • 955432842 (xsd:integer)
  • 955432998 (xsd:integer)
  • 955433265 (xsd:integer)
  • 955433743 (xsd:integer)
  • 955434008 (xsd:integer)
  • 955434221 (xsd:integer)
  • 955434262 (xsd:integer)
  • 955434366 (xsd:integer)
  • 956288237 (xsd:integer)
  • 956288314 (xsd:integer)
  • 956288713 (xsd:integer)
  • 957386817 (xsd:integer)
  • 957390989 (xsd:integer)
  • 957391077 (xsd:integer)
  • 957391398 (xsd:integer)
  • 957391468 (xsd:integer)
  • 957391665 (xsd:integer)
  • 957391715 (xsd:integer)
  • 957391916 (xsd:integer)
  • 957392055 (xsd:integer)
  • 957392257 (xsd:integer)
  • 957392288 (xsd:integer)
  • 957392610 (xsd:integer)
  • 957392660 (xsd:integer)
  • 957392843 (xsd:integer)
  • 957392925 (xsd:integer)
  • 957392987 (xsd:integer)
  • 957393076 (xsd:integer)
  • 957393367 (xsd:integer)
  • 957393407 (xsd:integer)
  • 957394481 (xsd:integer)
  • 957394586 (xsd:integer)
  • 957395359 (xsd:integer)
  • 957395438 (xsd:integer)
  • 957395601 (xsd:integer)
  • 957395652 (xsd:integer)
  • 957395799 (xsd:integer)
  • 957395876 (xsd:integer)
  • 957395948 (xsd:integer)
  • 957429905 (xsd:integer)
  • 957429918 (xsd:integer)
  • 957668149 (xsd:integer)
  • 957669831 (xsd:integer)
  • 957670455 (xsd:integer)
  • 957670972 (xsd:integer)
  • 957671152 (xsd:integer)
  • 957671250 (xsd:integer)
  • 958083212 (xsd:integer)
  • 958084873 (xsd:integer)
  • 958447977 (xsd:integer)
  • 958448065 (xsd:integer)
  • 958480503 (xsd:integer)
  • 959203395 (xsd:integer)
  • 959203867 (xsd:integer)
  • 959204126 (xsd:integer)
  • 959206314 (xsd:integer)
  • 959206737 (xsd:integer)
  • 959207790 (xsd:integer)
  • 959208392 (xsd:integer)
  • 959208478 (xsd:integer)
  • 959208935 (xsd:integer)
  • 959209598 (xsd:integer)
  • 959209740 (xsd:integer)
  • 959210400 (xsd:integer)
  • 959210517 (xsd:integer)
  • 959210814 (xsd:integer)
  • 959210863 (xsd:integer)
  • 959211188 (xsd:integer)
  • 959211276 (xsd:integer)
  • 959211479 (xsd:integer)
  • 959211732 (xsd:integer)
  • 959211947 (xsd:integer)
  • 959212101 (xsd:integer)
  • 960653044 (xsd:integer)
  • 961557252 (xsd:integer)
  • 961649264 (xsd:integer)
  • 962146527 (xsd:integer)
  • 962889064 (xsd:integer)
  • 962891089 (xsd:integer)
  • 963023895 (xsd:integer)
  • 963023957 (xsd:integer)
  • 963296734 (xsd:integer)
  • 963865421 (xsd:integer)
  • 966933210 (xsd:integer)
  • 967603909 (xsd:integer)
  • 967605721 (xsd:integer)
  • 968043279 (xsd:integer)
  • 968043297 (xsd:integer)
  • 968043418 (xsd:integer)
  • 968045036 (xsd:integer)
  • 968045899 (xsd:integer)
  • 968090624 (xsd:integer)
  • 968556495 (xsd:integer)
  • 969416447 (xsd:integer)
  • 969416508 (xsd:integer)
  • 969590280 (xsd:integer)
  • 969590584 (xsd:integer)
  • 969715591 (xsd:integer)
  • 969715640 (xsd:integer)
  • 970377202 (xsd:integer)
  • 970396111 (xsd:integer)
  • 970396195 (xsd:integer)
  • 970547814 (xsd:integer)
  • 970547928 (xsd:integer)
  • 970549884 (xsd:integer)
  • 970696396 (xsd:integer)
  • 971498795 (xsd:integer)
  • 971499103 (xsd:integer)
  • 971500412 (xsd:integer)
  • 971500554 (xsd:integer)
  • 971500827 (xsd:integer)
  • 971501405 (xsd:integer)
  • 971502410 (xsd:integer)
  • 971955648 (xsd:integer)
  • 971991566 (xsd:integer)
  • 971991619 (xsd:integer)
  • 972018391 (xsd:integer)
  • 973836501 (xsd:integer)
  • 973836883 (xsd:integer)
  • 973849552 (xsd:integer)
  • 974435531 (xsd:integer)
  • 975175846 (xsd:integer)
  • 975275615 (xsd:integer)
  • 975378367 (xsd:integer)
  • 976555685 (xsd:integer)
  • 976791112 (xsd:integer)
  • 976805556 (xsd:integer)
  • 977785176 (xsd:integer)
  • 977787132 (xsd:integer)
  • 977867608 (xsd:integer)
  • 978471004 (xsd:integer)
  • 978471422 (xsd:integer)
  • 979846896 (xsd:integer)
  • 981779562 (xsd:integer)
  • 981780670 (xsd:integer)
  • 981782603 (xsd:integer)
  • 981787734 (xsd:integer)
  • 981789578 (xsd:integer)
  • 981790308 (xsd:integer)
  • 981790444 (xsd:integer)
  • 981790506 (xsd:integer)
  • 981796130 (xsd:integer)
  • 982778702 (xsd:integer)
  • 982778809 (xsd:integer)
  • 982778928 (xsd:integer)
  • 982779005 (xsd:integer)
  • 982787742 (xsd:integer)
  • 982787986 (xsd:integer)
  • 982797696 (xsd:integer)
  • 982875071 (xsd:integer)
  • 982882647 (xsd:integer)
  • 982884539 (xsd:integer)
  • 982884706 (xsd:integer)
  • 982933110 (xsd:integer)
  • 982933217 (xsd:integer)
  • 983469415 (xsd:integer)
  • 983471811 (xsd:integer)
  • 983473454 (xsd:integer)
  • 983473552 (xsd:integer)
  • 983473900 (xsd:integer)
  • 983474006 (xsd:integer)
  • 983474361 (xsd:integer)
  • 983474568 (xsd:integer)
  • 983475841 (xsd:integer)
  • 983475996 (xsd:integer)
  • 983505223 (xsd:integer)
  • 983606968 (xsd:integer)
  • 983659406 (xsd:integer)
  • 983659601 (xsd:integer)
  • 983659629 (xsd:integer)
  • 983659963 (xsd:integer)
  • 983661924 (xsd:integer)
  • 983666282 (xsd:integer)
  • 983786139 (xsd:integer)
  • 983791136 (xsd:integer)
  • 983865985 (xsd:integer)
  • 983866789 (xsd:integer)
  • 984902316 (xsd:integer)
  • 985479601 (xsd:integer)
  • 985482086 (xsd:integer)
  • 985482963 (xsd:integer)
  • 985501443 (xsd:integer)
  • 985501620 (xsd:integer)
  • 985501725 (xsd:integer)
  • 985502098 (xsd:integer)
  • 985521212 (xsd:integer)
  • 985638109 (xsd:integer)
  • 985988093 (xsd:integer)
  • 985988479 (xsd:integer)
  • 985997737 (xsd:integer)
  • 986136790 (xsd:integer)
  • 987091555 (xsd:integer)
  • 987141444 (xsd:integer)
  • 988168223 (xsd:integer)
  • 988184333 (xsd:integer)
  • 988967532 (xsd:integer)
  • 988972072 (xsd:integer)
  • 990289929 (xsd:integer)
  • 990292556 (xsd:integer)
  • 990573886 (xsd:integer)
  • 990574417 (xsd:integer)
  • 990574482 (xsd:integer)
  • 990574599 (xsd:integer)
  • 990893152 (xsd:integer)
  • 994139486 (xsd:integer)
  • 994139563 (xsd:integer)
  • 994326129 (xsd:integer)
  • 994405335 (xsd:integer)
  • 995167592 (xsd:integer)
  • 995167637 (xsd:integer)
  • 996314711 (xsd:integer)
  • 996318175 (xsd:integer)
  • 997247855 (xsd:integer)
  • 997247955 (xsd:integer)
  • 997391698 (xsd:integer)
  • 999031384 (xsd:integer)
  • 999145696 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000041665 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000041975 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000170633 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000185500 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000671569 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000732966 (xsd:integer)
  • 1000897248 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001609287 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001609377 (xsd:integer)
  • 1001720269 (xsd:integer)
  • 1004202722 (xsd:integer)
  • 1005934791 (xsd:integer)
  • 1005934976 (xsd:integer)
  • 1005940614 (xsd:integer)
  • 1005947514 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008491694 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008694484 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008694916 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008695216 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008697017 (xsd:integer)
  • 1008697269 (xsd:integer)
  • 1010190417 (xsd:integer)
  • 1010254342 (xsd:integer)
  • 1010254759 (xsd:integer)
  • 1010254808 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013118625 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013718721 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013722505 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013723006 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013794875 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013797765 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013798013 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013799305 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013799825 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013800043 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013883584 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013885653 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013898335 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013898840 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013898884 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013982754 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013984344 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013984724 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013988485 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013991020 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013994204 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013995251 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013995745 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013997777 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013999454 (xsd:integer)
  • 1013999534 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014009127 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014016053 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014016594 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014034898 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014062590 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014148182 (xsd:integer)
  • 1014268325 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL; formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith) is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremi (en)
  • The Anti-Differentiation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the differentiation of social discussion, and to polarise society into increasingly anti-free speech attitudes and elevated treatment to minorities" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose a (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international criminal Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism an (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewishreligious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antis (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing anti (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewishreligious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewishterror service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewishterror service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposin (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish terrorist service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opp (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish terrorist service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To maintain Jewish supremacy while curtailing the rights of Muslims and Christians across the world " via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us ba (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. In its 2017 annual information Form 990, ADL reported total revenues of just over $70 million, from contributions and grants. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To eliminate Islam and Christianity through media and politics. To maintain Jewish Supremacy over the masses." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish religious extremist non-governmental organization based in the United States that protects the international Jewish child sex slave trade. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop Islam and Christianity" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which not a single Christian or Muslim breath the air (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States that protects the international Jewish child sex slave trade. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no gro (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Jewish Mafia, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Religious Extremist Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discr (en)
  • {{Infobox organization| name = Anti-Defamation League| image = ADL logo (2018).svg| size = 200px| motto = We Hate Christ | formation = September 1913 (as Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith)| founder = Simon of Trent| headquarters = New York City, New York, U.S.| type = Civil rights law| leader_title = Director| leader_name = Simon of Trent| key_people = Sigmund Livingston (founder)Esta Gordon Epstein (chair)| website = The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Religious Extremist Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an (en)
  • Free Palestine | name = Anti-Defamation League| image = ADL logo (2018).svg| size = 200px| motto = We Hate Christ | formation = September 1913 (as Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith)| founder = Simon of Trent| headquarters = New York City, New York, U.S.| type = Civil rights law| leader_title = Director| leader_name = Simon of Trent| key_people = Sigmund Livingston (founder)Esta Gordon Epstein (chair)| website = The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Religious Extremist Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an indepen (en)
  • Free Palestine The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Religious Extremist Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers f (en)
  • Free Palestine The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimina (en)
  • Reject Zionist Propaganda + Free Palestine The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual s (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international far-left Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination o (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To promote Jewish supremacy while eroding the rights of Christians and Muslims across the world " via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hat (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewishterrorist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination o (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish extremist terrorist group non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent U.S. Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, (en)
  • PoggersPoggersPoggers Poggers Poggers Poggers Poggers | name = Anti-Defamation League| image = ADL logo (2018).svg| size = 200px| motto = Fighting Hate for Good| formation = September 1913 (as Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith)| founder = Sigmund Livingston| headquarters = New York City, New York, U.S.| type = Civil rights law| leader_title = CEO| leader_name = Jonathan Greenblatt| key_people = Sigmund Livingston (founder)Esta Gordon Epstein (chair)| website = adl.org}} (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." Opposing antisemitism and extremism, ADL describes its "ultimate goal" as "a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate." (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is a far-left extremist, anti-Jewish, and anti-science hate group that promotes the vile transgender ideology and rejects biological science and reality. It is also an international cultural Marxist non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all" via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international (((Jewish))) non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extr (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the criticism of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all, except for ethnic Europeans. " via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of, as it declares and labels as, hate, a (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish hate group based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and off, ADL (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both online and (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), is a jewish tool to stop any negative information about the jewish plan for world dominance. Any talks of jewish corruption or uncovering of their evil plan are twisted and turned against the reporter of such information and labled as anti semetic.formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the wrongful conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, an (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism both onli (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremi (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. Led by national director Adam Joseph who oddly enough makes $700,000/year, the ADL has been extremely effective in reducing the number of race wars that occur annually. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating self determination and other forms of based, and fighting domestic (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for killing rapist and murder Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, to defened their jewish buddy Leo Frank, who raped and killed a little Girl. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is a dual one: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domest (en)
  • The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. It was founded in late September 1913 by the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, a Jewish service organization, in the wake of the contentious conviction for murder of Leo Frank. ADL subsequently split from B'nai B'rith and continued as an independent US section 501(c)(3) nonprofit. ADL states that its mission is twofold: "To stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all," via the development of "new programs, policies and skills to expose and combat whatever holds us back." With a focus on combating antisemitism and other forms of hate, and fighting domestic extremism (en)
rdfs:label
  • Anti-Defamation League (en)
rdfs:seeAlso
owl:sameAs
foaf:homepage
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:knownFor of
is dbo:occupation of
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is rdfs:seeAlso of
is foaf:primaryTopic of