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  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Many claim that this quick, hot cooking seals in the flavors of the foods, as well as preserving their color and texture. The term "stir-fry" was introduced into the English language in Buwei Yang Chao's book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945), to describe the chǎo technique. (en)
  • 25بك المحتوى هنا ينقصه الاستشهاد بمصادر. يرجى إيراد مصادر موثوق بها. أي معلومات غير موثقة يمكن التشكيك بها وإزالتها. (مارس 2016) القلي السريع طريقة لتحضير الطعام يتميز فيها المطبخ في منطقة جنوب شرق أسيا في تايلند والصين وهي طريقة معتمدة لديهم في قلي الخضار دون سلقها أو شيها وتفيد هذه الطريقة في المحافظة على الفيتامينات القابلة للانحلال في الماء أو التأثر بالحرارة كفيتامين أ (A) وفيتامين ج (C). (ar)
  • El stir frying (que puede denominarse salteado agitado, salteado removido o salteado en wok) es una expresión inglesa que se emplea para denominar a cualquiera de las dos técnicas de la cocina china: chǎo (炒) y bào (爆). Ambas técnicas difieren sólo en la velocidad con la que se ejecuta la preparación de los platos, la cantidad de calor empleada, y como se lanza la comida en el wok. Los clientes de los restaurantes cantoneses juzgan la habilidad del chef realizando "stir frying" por el "wok hei" generado en la comida. Se cree que esto demuestra la capacidad del chef extrayendo el qi del wok. (es)
rdfs:label
  • Roerbakken (nl)
  • Smażenie w ruchu (pl)
  • Stir frying (es)
  • Стир-фрай (ru)
  • قلي سريع (ar)
  • (zh)
  • 炒める (ja)
dbo:abstract
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Many claim that this quick, hot cooking seals in the flavors of the foods, as well as preserving their color and texture. Scholars think that wok (or pan) frying may have been used as early as the Han dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) for drying grain, not for cooking, but it was not until the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) that the wok reached its modern shape and allowed quick cooking in hot oil. Well into the 20th century, while restaurants and affluent families could afford the oil and fuel needed for stir fry, the most widely used cooking techniques remained boiling and steaming. Stir fry cooking came to predominate over the course of the century as more people could afford oil and fuel, and in the West spread beyond Chinese communities. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. The term "stir-fry" was introduced into the English language in Buwei Yang Chao's book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945), to describe the chǎo technique. (en)
  • Roerbakken, wokken (Chinees: 炒, pinyin: chǎo) of omscheppend bakken is een van oorsprong uit Azië afkomstige kooktechniek voor het bereiden van voedsel in een wok (in Indonesië wadjan of wadjang), in sterk verhitte olie en op een hoog vuur. Hierbij wordt het gerecht continu omgeroerd (oorspronkelijk door de wok te schudden). Wokken stamt uit de omgeving van de Chinese stad Kanton. Eeuwen geleden groeide er nauwelijks hout en vuurbronnen waren er dus schaars. Dat betekende dat men gedwongen was tot economisch koken. De oplossing was groenten en vlees in kleine stukjes snijden en in een holle pan, boven een hoog vuur waar de wok van de hitte donkerrood werd, alle ingrediënten tegelijk snel te bakken. (nl)
  • El stir frying (que puede denominarse salteado agitado, salteado removido o salteado en wok) es una expresión inglesa que se emplea para denominar a cualquiera de las dos técnicas de la cocina china: chǎo (炒) y bào (爆). Ambas técnicas difieren sólo en la velocidad con la que se ejecuta la preparación de los platos, la cantidad de calor empleada, y como se lanza la comida en el wok. Los clientes de los restaurantes cantoneses juzgan la habilidad del chef realizando "stir frying" por el "wok hei" generado en la comida. Se cree que esto demuestra la capacidad del chef extrayendo el qi del wok. (es)
dbp:c
dbp:p
  • bào
  • chǎo
dbp:s
  • 镬气
dbp:t
  • 鑊氣
dbp:j
  • wok6 hei3
dbp:l
  • pop, explosion
dbp:links
  • no

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  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. (en)
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a LARGE amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. (en)
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a SMALL amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. (en)
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a NOoil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. (en)
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West.It is often used in many authentic Asian dishes, and is a much more healthier alternative of cooking, then oil-frying. The English language term "stir-fry" was coined by Y.R. Chao in Buwei Yang Chao's book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945), to describe the chǎo technique. (en)
dbo:abstract
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Scholars think that wok (or pan) frying may have been used as early as the Han dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) for drying grain, not for cooking, but it was not until the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) that the wok reached its modern shape and allowed quick cooking in hot oil. Well into the 20th century, while restaurants and affluent families could afford the oil and fuel needed for stir fry, the most widely used cooking techniques remained boiling and steaming. Stir fry cooking came to predominate over the course of the century as more people could afford oil and fuel, and in the West spread beyond Chinese communities. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. The English language term "stir-fry" was coined by Y.R. Chao in Buwei Yang Chao's book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945), to describe the chǎo technique. (en)
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a LARGE amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Scholars think that wok (or pan) frying may have been used as early as the Han dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) for drying grain, not for cooking, but it was not until the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) that the wok reached its modern shape and allowed quick cooking in hot oil. Well into the 20th century, while restaurants and affluent families could afford the oil and fuel needed for stir fry, the most widely used cooking techniques remained boiling and steaming. Stir fry cooking came to predominate over the course of the century as more people could afford oil and fuel, and in the West spread beyond Chinese communities. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. The English language term "stir-fry" was coined by Y.R. Chao in Buwei Yang Chao's book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945), to describe the chǎo technique. (en)
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a SMALL amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Scholars think that wok (or pan) frying may have been used as early as the Han dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) for drying grain, not for cooking, but it was not until the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) that the wok reached its modern shape and allowed quick cooking in hot oil. Well into the 20th century, while restaurants and affluent families could afford the oil and fuel needed for stir fry, the most widely used cooking techniques remained boiling and steaming. Stir fry cooking came to predominate over the course of the century as more people could afford oil and fuel, and in the West spread beyond Chinese communities. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. The English language term "stir-fry" was coined by Y.R. Chao in Buwei Yang Chao's book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945), to describe the chǎo technique. (en)
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a NOoil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Scholars think that wok (or pan) frying may have been used as early as the Han dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) for drying grain, not for cooking, but it was not until the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) that the wok reached its modern shape and allowed quick cooking in hot oil. Well into the 20th century, while restaurants and affluent families could afford the oil and fuel needed for stir fry, the most widely used cooking techniques remained boiling and steaming. Stir fry cooking came to predominate over the course of the century as more people could afford oil and fuel, and in the West spread beyond Chinese communities. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. The English language term "stir-fry" was coined by Y.R. Chao in Buwei Yang Chao's book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945), to describe the chǎo technique. (en)
  • Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West.It is often used in many authentic Asian dishes, and is a much more healthier alternative of cooking, then oil-frying. Scholars think that wok (or pan) frying may have been used as early as the Han dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) for drying grain, not for cooking, but it was not until the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) that the wok reached its modern shape and allowed quick cooking in hot oil. Well into the 20th century, while restaurants and affluent families could afford the oil and fuel needed for stir fry, the most widely used cooking techniques remained boiling and steaming. Stir fry cooking came to predominate over the course of the century as more people could afford oil and fuel, and in the West spread beyond Chinese communities. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. The English language term "stir-fry" was coined by Y.R. Chao in Buwei Yang Chao's book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945), to describe the chǎo technique. (en)
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