About: Siege of Senonae     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : yago:MilitaryAction100952963, within Data Space : live.dbpedia.org associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://live.dbpedia.org/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FSiege_of_Senonae

In 356 AD, after leaving Cologne, Roman Emperor Julian the Apostate over-wintered in Senonae (possibly modern Sens) in Gaul. Following desertions from his German federated troops, hostile Germanic warbands learned that his force was under-strength and moved to attack the town. However, they were not able to break into the town, lacking advanced siegecraft, and could only prevent Julian from venturing outside the walls. After a month, they withdrew.

AttributesValues
rdf:type
thumbnail
sameAs
georss:point
  • 48.2 3.283333
geo:lat
geo:long
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Siege of Senonae
rdfs:comment
  • In 356 AD, after leaving Cologne, Roman Emperor Julian the Apostate over-wintered in Senonae (possibly modern Sens) in Gaul. Following desertions from his German federated troops, hostile Germanic warbands learned that his force was under-strength and moved to attack the town. However, they were not able to break into the town, lacking advanced siegecraft, and could only prevent Julian from venturing outside the walls. After a month, they withdrew.
rdfs:label
  • Siege of Senonae
has abstract
  • In 356 AD, after leaving Cologne, Roman Emperor Julian the Apostate over-wintered in Senonae (possibly modern Sens) in Gaul. Following desertions from his German federated troops, hostile Germanic warbands learned that his force was under-strength and moved to attack the town. However, they were not able to break into the town, lacking advanced siegecraft, and could only prevent Julian from venturing outside the walls. After a month, they withdrew. Finally, after a month the savages withdrew crestfallen, muttering that they had been silly and foolish to have contemplated the blockade of the city. But — a thing to be regarded as a shameful situation — while Caesar was in jeopardy, Marcellus, master of the horse, although he was stationed in neighbouring posts, postponed sending him reinforcements; whereas even if the city alone was endangered, to say nothing of the prince's presence there, it ought to have been saved from the hardships of blockade by the intervention of a large force.
causalties
  • Unknown
combatant
  • Alamanni
  • 25px|alt=|link=Western Roman Empire
  • 18px|alt=|link=Western Roman Empire
commander
Relates an entity ...ch it is located.
result
  • Roman victory
strength
  • Unknown
Link to the Wikipage edit URL
extraction datetime
Link to the Wikipage history URL
Wikipage page ID
page length (characters) of wiki page
Wikipage modification datetime
Wiki page out degree
Wikipage revision ID
Link to the Wikipage revision URL
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
foaf:depiction
  • External Image
geo:geometry
  • POINT(3.2833330631256 48.200000762939)
is foaf:primaryTopic of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 10 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3319 as of Sep 1 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2021 OpenLink Software