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Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship.

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  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Islamic faiths and Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Islam and Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Eritrea gained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993, ratified a constitution in 1997 that includes freedom of religion (and general elections), but has been at a political standstill under the complete authority of self-appointed President-for-life Isaias Afwerki, since 1993. Since May 2002, Afwerki's government has officially only four faith groups: the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle only required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal inform
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since gained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993, then ratifying a constitution in 1997, Eritrea purports to have freedom of religion. However, self-appointed President-for-life Isaias Afwerki, in charge since 1993, has officially allowed only four faith groups: three denominations (Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, Eritrean Catholic Church, Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea) and one Islamic school (Sunni Islam). All other faiths and denominations are in principle only required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they have not allowed to register.
  • projection-table/2050/percent/all/|publisher=Pew Research Center|access-date=26 October 2017}}</ref>|label1=Christianity|value1=62.9|color1=Blue|label2=Islam|value2=36.6|color2=Green|label3=Others|value3=1|color3=Red}}
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  • Religion in Eritrea
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  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 59% of the population was Christian and around 40% was Muslim. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 46% of the population was Christian and around 54% was Muslim. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Islamic faiths and Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 59% of the population was Christian and around 40% was Muslim. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Islam and Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 59% of the population was Christian and around 40% was Muslim. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 50% of the population was Christian and around 48% was Muslim. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 50 percent of the population is Sunni Muslim and 30 percent is Orthodox Christian. Approximately 13 percent of the population is Roman Catholic, while groups that constitute less than 5 percent of the population include Protestants, Seventh-day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Buddhist, Hindus, and Baha'is. Approximately 2 percent of the population practice traditional indigenous religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. In its yerly estimate in 2020 Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 59% of the population was Christian and around 40% was Muslim. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions for it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 59% of the population was Christian and around 40% was Muslim. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions for in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 59% of the population was Christian and around 40% was Muslim. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 59% of the population was Christian and around 40% was Muslim. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) eestimated that 50 percent of the population is Sunni Muslim and 30 percent is Orthodox Christian. Approximately 13 percent of the population is Roman Catholic, while groups that constitute less than 5 percent of the population include Protestants, Seventh-day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Buddhist, Hindus, and Baha'is. Approximately 2 percent of the population practice traditional indigenous religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2010, the United States Department of State (USDoS) estimated that 50 percent of the population is Sunni Muslim and 30 percent is Orthodox Christian. Approximately 13 percent of the population is Roman Catholic, while groups that constitute less than 5 percent of the population include Protestants, Seventh-day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Buddhist, Hindus, and Baha'is. Approximately 2 percent of the population practice traditional indigenous religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that there no reliable figures on religious affiliation, however they cite the pew study as source in their report on religous freedom in Eritrea. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the pew study as source in their report on religous freedom in Eritrea. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the pew research figures in their report on religous freedom in Eritrea. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they site that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Christian and 49 percent Sunni Muslim. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation. They also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follow other religions. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in it’s annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam .Research suggests that Christian50%, and 50% follows Islam In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that % are Christian, and % follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 50% are Christian, and 50 % follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. . . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 36% are Christian, and 63% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 50% are Christian, and 50% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. . According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest 3-4% follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Eritrea gained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993, ratified a constitution in 1997 that includes freedom of religion (and general elections), but has been at a political standstill under the complete authority of self-appointed President-for-life Isaias Afwerki, since 1993. Since May 2002, Afwerki's government has officially only four faith groups: the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle only required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. Per the four groups above, there are only major religions in Eritrea, Christianity (four denominations) and Islam (only the Sunni school). However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. A Pew Research Center report, providing estimates of the 2010 religious population of Eritrea, believes that nearly 63% are Christian, nearly 37% follow Islam, and a remaining <0.5% attempt to discreetly follow other religions. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Eritrea gained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993, ratified a constitution in 1997 that includes freedom of religion (and general elections), but has been at a political standstill under the complete authority of self-appointed President-for-life Isaias Afwerki, since 1993. Since May 2002, Afwerki's government has officially only four faith groups: the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle only required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. Per the four groups above, there are only major religions in Eritrea, Christianity (four denominations) and Islam (only the Sunni school). However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. A Pew Research Center report, providing estimates of the 2010 religious population of Eritrea, believes that nearly 63 percent are Christians, nearly 37 percent are Muslims, and a remaining less than 0.5 percent attempt to discreetly follow other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) confirmed that state-sanctioned persecution causes those who follow the unsanctioned religions to stay quiet, or attend a sanctioned church for major ceremonies (such as funerals); this results in the USDoS confirming that data is unreliable, and cites the figures of the Pew Research Center, while mentioning that other sources suggest a more even split of 49 percent each for Sunni Muslims and Christians, with as much as 2 percent following other denominations and religions. They note, however, that reports suggest as few as 200 followers of the Baháʼí Faith, that there may only be one surviving Jewish person, and that many of the remaining unsanctioned followers are held indefinitely in prison on various charges. In a 2016 report by Aid to the Church in Need, they estimated around 50.1 percent of Eritrea's population adhered to Islam, and 47.9 percent followed Christianity, and all remaining religions accounting for 2 percent. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Eritrea gained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993, ratified a constitution in 1997 that includes freedom of religion (and general elections), but has been at a political standstill under the complete authority of self-appointed President-for-life Isaias Afwerki, since 1993. Since May 2002, Afwerki's government has officially only four faith groups: the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle only required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. Per the four groups above, there are only major religions in Eritrea, Christianity (four denominations) and Islam (only the Sunni school). However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. A Pew Research Center report, providing estimates of the 2010 religious population of Eritrea, believes that nearly 63 percent are Christians, nearly 37 percent are Muslims, and a remaining less than 0.5 percent attempt to discreetly follow other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) confirmed that state-sanctioned persecution causes those who follow the unsanctioned religions to stay quiet, or attend a sanctioned church for major ceremonies (such as funerals); this results in the USDoS confirming that data is unreliable, and cites the figures of the Pew Research Center, while mentioning that other sources suggest a more even split of 49 percent each for Sunni Muslims and Christians, with as much as 2 percent following other denominations and religions. They note, however, that reports suggest as few as 200 followers of the Baháʼí Faith, that there may only be one surviving Jewish person, and that many of the remaining unsanctioned followers are held indefinitely in prison on various charges. In a 2016 report by Aid to the Church in Need, they estimated around 50.1 percent of Eritrea's population adhered to Islam, and 47.9 percent followed Christianity, and all remaining religions accounting for 2 percent. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others; and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Eritrea gained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993, ratified a constitution in 1997 that includes freedom of religion (and general elections), but has been at a political standstill under the complete authority of self-appointed President-for-life Isaias Afwerki, since 1993. Since May 2002, Afwerki's government has officially only four faith groups: the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle only required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. Per the four groups above, there are only major religions in Eritrea, Christianity (four denominations) and Islam (only the Sunni school). However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. A Pew Research Center report, providing estimates of the 2010 religious population of Eritrea, believes that nearly 63 percent are Christians, nearly 37 percent are Muslims, and a remaining less than 0.5 percent attempt to discreetly follow other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) confirmed that state-sanctioned persecution causes those who follow the unsanctioned religions to stay quiet, or attend a sanctioned church for major ceremonies (such as funerals); this results in the USDoS confirming that data is unreliable, and cites the figures of the Pew Research Center, while mentioning that other sources suggest a more even split of 49 percent each for Sunni Muslims and Christians, with as much as 2 percent following other denominations and religions. They note, however, that reports suggest as few as 200 followers of the Baháʼí Faith, that there may only be one surviving Jewish person, and that many of the remaining unsanctioned followers are held indefinitely in prison on various charges. In a 2016 report by Aid to the Church in Need, they estimated around 50.1 percent of Eritrea's population adhered to Islam, and 47.9 percent followed Christianity, and all remaining religions accounting for 2 percent. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Eritrea gained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993, ratified a constitution in 1997 that includes freedom of religion (and general elections), but has been at a political standstill under the complete authority of self-appointed President-for-life Isaias Afwerki, since 1993. Since May 2002, Afwerki's government has officially only four faith groups: the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle only required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. Per the four groups above, there are only two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity (four denominations) and Islam (only the Sunni school). However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. A Pew Research Center report, providing estimates of the 2010 religious population of Eritrea, believes that nearly 63 percent are Christians, nearly 37 percent are Muslims, and a remaining less than 0.5 percent attempt to discreetly follow other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) confirmed that state-sanctioned persecution causes those who follow the unsanctioned religions to stay quiet, or attend a sanctioned church for major ceremonies (such as funerals); this results in the USDoS confirming that data is unreliable, and cites the figures of the Pew Research Center, while mentioning that other sources suggest a more even split of 49 percent each for Sunni Muslims and Christians, with as much as 2 percent following other denominations and religions. They note, however, that reports suggest as few as 200 followers of the Baháʼí Faith, that there may only be one surviving Jewish person, and that many of the remaining unsanctioned followers are held indefinitely in prison on various charges. In a 2016 report by Aid to the Church in Need, they estimated around 50.1 percent of Eritrea's population adhered to Islam, and 47.9 percent followed Christianity, and all remaining religions accounting for 2 percent. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since gained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993, then ratifying a constitution in 1997, Eritrea purports to have freedom of religion. However, self-appointed President-for-life Isaias Afwerki, in charge since 1993, has officially allowed only four faith groups: three denominations (Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, Eritrean Catholic Church, Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea) and one Islamic school (Sunni Islam). All other faiths and denominations are in principle only required to undergo a registration process, but in practice they have not allowed to register. Gathering data in Eritrea is difficult, but various estimates exist, all with the four sanctioned Christian and Muslim faiths accounting for 98 to 99.5 percent of the total population, with the remaining 0.5 to 2 percent attempting to discreetly follow unsanctioned denominations or religions, including the Baháʼí Faith, traditional faiths and animism.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest (3-4%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • projection-table/2050/percent/all/|publisher=Pew Research Center|access-date=26 October 2017}}</ref>|label1=Christianity|value1=62.9|color1=Blue|label2=Islam|value2=36.6|color2=Green|label3=Others|value3=1|color3=Red}} Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest (3-4%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Islam, and 36% follows christian, and the rest (3-4%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The GOE has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 36% follows Islam, and the rest (3-4%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The government of Eritrea has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 63% are Christian, and 33% follows Islam, and the rest (3-4%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The government of Eritrea has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 35% are Christian, and 63% follows Islam, and the rest (3-4%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The government of Eritrea has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 48% are Christian, and 50% follows Islam, and the rest (2%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The government of Eritrea has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 47% are Christian, and 47% follows Islam, and the rest (3-4%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 51.6% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 46.4% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The government of Eritrea has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 79% are Christian, and 17% follows Islam, and the rest (4%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 49 percent Sunni Muslim and 49 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 20% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 80% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The government of Eritrea has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
  • Religion in Eritrea mainly consists of Abrahamic faiths. Since May 2002, the Eritrean government has officially recognized the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Eritrea, and Sunni Islam. All other faiths and denominations are in principle required to undergo a registration process; in practice they are not allowed to register. Among other things, the government's registration system requires religious groups to submit personal information on their membership to be allowed to worship. There are two major religions in Eritrea, Christianity and Islam. However, the number of adherents is subject to debate. Pew research estimates that 79% are Christian, and 17% follows Islam, and the rest (4%) follows other religions in its annual estimates for 2020. In 2018, the United States Department of State (USDoS) claimed that they do not have figures on religious affiliation of Eritrea, however they cite the figures of the Pew Research foundation in their report, they also state that some government, religious, and international sources estimate the population to be 16 percent Sunni Muslim and 80 percent Christians and that the rest follows other religions. According to the ACS-Italia, around 20% of Eritrea's population in 2017 adhered to Islam, and 80% followed Christianity. The remaining 2% of residents practiced other religions, including traditional faiths and animism. All communities in Eritrea are deeply religious and have coexisted peacefully and in harmony alongside each other for centuries. This is why there is a noticeable lack of religious extremism. The country straddles a region grappling with considerable fundamentalist and extremist tendencies. Furthermore, the State of Eritrea is a secular state. As such, there is no state religion; the State does not proscribe or support one faith over others, and all religions are equally treated and operate independently from the State. The government of Eritrea has from the outset officially sanctioned and provided protocol status recognition to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, the Eritrean Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Islam. Since 2002, all other faiths and denominations are required by law to undergo registration process. The Pentecostal groups did not comply with the registrations requirements, while other Protestant denominations such as Presbyterians still officially maintain their offices with pending approval. Generally, the government discourages proliferation of new religious groups. The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and the Tigray Region in northern Ethiopia, arose somewhere around the first or second centuries. The Aksumites erected a number of large stelae, which served a religious purpose in pre-Christian times. Over 200 years after the kingdom's formation, it adopted Christianity under King Ezana. Eritrea was also one of the first Islamic settlements in Africa, as a group of Muslims facing persecution in Mecca migrated to the Kingdom of Aksum.
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