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The Palmyrene Empire was a splinter state centered at Palmyra which broke away from the Roman Empire during the Crisis of the Third Century. It encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, Egypt and large parts of Asia Minor. The Palmyrene Empire is hailed in Syria and plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.

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  • Palmyrene Empire
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  • The Palmyrene Empire was a splinter state centered at Palmyra which broke away from the Roman Empire during the Crisis of the Third Century. It encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, Egypt and large parts of Asia Minor. The Palmyrene Empire is hailed in Syria and plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short lived splinter state of the Roman Empire that resulted during the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after it capita and largest city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, home to Palmyra's ruins, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after it capital and largest city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short-lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after it capital and largest city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short-lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after its capital and largest city, Palmyra, at its height it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short-lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after its capital and largest city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short-lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after its capital city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
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  • Palmyrene Empire
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  • The Palmyrene Empire was a splinter state centered at Palmyra which broke away from the Roman Empire during the Crisis of the Third Century. It encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, Egypt and large parts of Asia Minor. Zenobia ruled the Palmyrene Empire as regent for her son Vaballathus, who had become King of Palmyra in 267. In 270 Zenobia managed to conquer most of the Roman east in a relatively short period, and tried to maintain relations with Rome. In 271 she claimed the imperial title for herself and for her son and fought a short war with the Roman emperor Aurelian, who conquered Palmyra and captured the self-proclaimed Empress. A year later the Palmyrenes rebelled, which led Aurelian to destroy Palmyra. The Palmyrene Empire is hailed in Syria and plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short lived splinter state of the Roman Empire that resulted during the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after it capita and largest city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. The Palmyrene Empire was ruled by Queen Zenobia, officially as regent for her son Vaballathus, who inherired the throne in 267 at age ten. In 270, Zenobia rapidly conquered most of the Roman east, attemptimg to maintain relations with Rome as a legitimate power. In 271 she claimed the imperial title for both herself and her son, fighting a short war with the Roman emperor Aurelian, who conquered Palmyra and captured the self-proclaimed Empress. A year later the Palmyrenes rebelled, which led Aurelian to destroy Palmyra. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, home to Palmyra's ruins, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after it capital and largest city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. The Palmyrene Empire was ruled by Queen Zenobia, officially as regent for her son Vaballathus, who inherired the throne in 267 at age ten. In 270, Zenobia rapidly conquered most of the Roman east, attemptimg to maintain relations with Rome as a legitimate power. In 271 she claimed the imperial title for both herself and her son, fighting a short war with the Roman emperor Aurelian, who conquered Palmyra and captured the self-proclaimed Empress. A year later the Palmyrenes rebelled, which led Aurelian to destroy Palmyra. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short-lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after it capital and largest city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. The Palmyrene Empire was ruled by Queen Zenobia, officially as regent for her son Vaballathus, who inherired the throne in 267 at age ten. In 270, Zenobia rapidly conquered most of the Roman east, attemptimg to maintain relations with Rome as a legitimate power. In 271 she claimed the imperial title for both herself and her son, fighting a short war with the Roman emperor Aurelian, who conquered Palmyra and captured the self-proclaimed Empress. A year later the Palmyrenes rebelled, which led Aurelian to destroy Palmyra. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short-lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after its capital and largest city, Palmyra, at its height it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. Located in what is now central Syria, Palmyra was an ancient Mesopotamian settlement dating to the second millennium BCE, inhabited by a succession of Amorites, Arameans, and Arabs before coming under Roman rule in the first century CE. Situated at the crossroads between the Roman Mediterranean and the great Asian empires further east, it became one of the most prosperous and cosmopolitan cities in Rome, with its trade caravans stretching across the Roman Empire and Silk Road. It was known as the "pearl of the desert" for its wealth and monumental urban development, serving a center of considerable strategic and economic importance, which at times earned its rulers a certain degree of de facto autonomy. As the Roman Empire unraveled in the third century, Palmyra thus became the central base of one of the three major successor states. The Palmyrene Empire was declared by Queen Zenobia, the regent of her ten-year-old son Vaballathus, who inherited the throne in 267. She gradually took control of neighboring territories, and by 270 had conquered most of the Roman east, including all of resource-rich Egypt. While she initially sought to maintain relations with Rome as an equal, independent power, amid the weakened and dysfunctional state of the Roman Empire, in 271 she claimed the Roman imperial title for both herself and her son. Roman emperor Aurelian retaliated by invading Asia Minor, laying siege to Palmyra and capturing the self-proclaimed Empress. After the Palmyrenes rebelled against his rule the following year, Aurelian destroyed the city, ending its potential as a regional power base. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for the splendor of its capital city, and for its ruler being one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. The Augustan History, a collection of biographies of Roman emperors and pretenders, lamented that "all shame is exhausted, for in the weakened state of the [Roman] commonwealth. . . a foreigner, Zenobia by name . . . proceeded to cast about her shoulders the imperial mantle [and ruled] longer than could be endured from one of the female sex." The empire is also regarded fondly in Syria, where it is a major icon of Syrian nationalism, with Zenobia enjoying both a popular and official cult following, including formerly appearing on a banknote.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short-lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after its capital and largest city, Palmyra, at its height it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. Located in what is now central Syria, Palmyra was an ancient Mesopotamian settlement dating to the second millennium BCE, inhabited by a succession of Amorites, Arameans, and Arabs before coming under Roman rule in the first century CE. Situated at the crossroads between the Roman Mediterranean and the great Asian empires further east, it became one of the most prosperous and cosmopolitan cities in Rome, with its trade caravans stretching across the Roman Empire and Silk Road. It was known as the "pearl of the desert" for its wealth and monumental urban development, serving a center of considerable strategic and economic importance, which at times earned its rulers a certain degree of de facto autonomy. As the Roman Empire unraveled in the third century, Palmyra thus became the central base of one of the three major successor states. The Palmyrene Empire was declared by Queen Zenobia, the regent of her ten-year-old son Vaballathus, who inherited the throne in 267. She gradually took control of neighboring territories, and by 270 had conquered most of the Roman east, including all of resource-rich Egypt. While she initially sought to maintain relations with Rome as an equal, independent power, amid the weakened and dysfunctional state of the Roman Empire, in 271 she claimed the Roman imperial title for both herself and her son. Roman emperor Aurelian retaliated by invading Asia Minor, laying siege to Palmyra and capturing the self-proclaimed Empress. After the Palmyrenes rebelled against his rule the following year, Aurelian destroyed the city, ending its potential as a regional power base. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for the splendor of its capital city, and for its ruler being one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. The Augustan History, a collection of biographies of Roman emperors and pretenders, lamented that "all shame is exhausted, for in the weakened state of the [Roman] commonwealth. . . a foreigner, Zenobia by name . . . proceeded to cast about her shoulders the imperial mantle [and ruled] longer than could be endured from one of the female sex." The empire is also regarded fondly in Syria, where it is a major icon of Syrian nationalism, with Zenobia enjoying both a popular and official cult following.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short-lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after its capital and largest city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. The Palmyrene Empire was ruled by Queen Zenobia, officially as regent for her son Vaballathus, who inherited the throne in 267 at age ten. In 270, Zenobia rapidly conquered most of the Roman east, attempting to maintain relations with Rome as a legitimate power. In 271 she claimed the imperial title for both herself and her son, fighting a short war with the Roman emperor Aurelian, who conquered Palmyra and captured the self-proclaimed Empress. A year later the Palmyrenes rebelled, which led Aurelian to destroy Palmyra. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
  • The Palmyrene Empire was a short-lived splinter state of the Roman Empire resulting from the Crisis of the Third Century. Named after its capital city, Palmyra, it encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, and Egypt, as well as large parts of Asia Minor. The Palmyrene Empire was ruled by Queen Zenobia, officially as regent for her son Vaballathus, who inherited the throne in 267 at age ten. In 270, Zenobia rapidly conquered most of the Roman east, attempting to maintain relations with Rome as a legitimate power. In 271 she claimed the imperial title for both herself and her son, fighting a short war with the Roman emperor Aurelian, who conquered Palmyra and captured the self-proclaimed Empress. A year later the Palmyrenes rebelled, which led Aurelian to destroy Palmyra. Despite its brief existence, the Palmyrene Empire is remembered for having been ruled by one of the most ambitious and powerful women in late antiquity. It is also hailed in Syria, where it plays an important role as an icon in Syrian nationalism.
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