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Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, and human rights in China in general.

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  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, and human rights in China in general.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the persecution of Falun Gong, and human rights in China in general.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the PRC Government's response to the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China, the persecution of Falun Gong, and human rights in China in general.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC Government's response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and human rights in China generally.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC government's pandemic response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and more general issues related to human rights in China.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Chinese Communist Party. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC government's pandemic response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and more general issues related to human rights in China.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Chinese Communist Party. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the Genocide of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC government's pandemic response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and more general issues related to human rights in China.
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  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues
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  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, and human rights in China in general. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government encourages its netizens to combat any perceived threats to the territorial integrity of China, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education" system since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and corporations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the persecution of Falun Gong, and human rights in China in general. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government encourages its netizens to combat any perceived threats to the territorial integrity of China, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education" system since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and corporations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the PRC Government's response to the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China, the persecution of Falun Gong, and human rights in China in general. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government encourages its netizens to combat any perceived threats to the territorial integrity of China, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education" system since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and corporations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC Government's response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and human rights in China generally. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government encourages its netizens to combat any perceived threats to the territorial integrity of China, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education" system since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and organisations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC Government's response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and human rights in China generally. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government pays its 50 Cent Party and encourages its Little Pink netizens to combat any perceived threats to the territorial integrity of China, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education" system since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and organisations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC government's pandemic response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and more general issues related to human rights in China. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government pays its 50 Cent Party and encourages its Little Pink netizens to combat any perceived threats to the territorial integrity of China, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education" system since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and organisations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Communist Party of China. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC government's pandemic response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and more general issues related to human rights in China. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government pays 50 Cent Party operatives and encourages "Little Pink" nationalist netizens to combat any perceived dissent against its position on Chinese issues, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education" system since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and organisations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Chinese Communist Party. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC government's pandemic response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and more general issues related to human rights in China. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government pays 50 Cent Party operatives and encourages "Little Pink" nationalist netizens to combat any perceived dissent against its position on Chinese issues, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education" system since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and organisations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Chinese Communist Party. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the persecution of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC government's pandemic response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and more general issues related to human rights in China. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government pays 50 Cent Party operatives and encourages "Little Pink" nationalist netizens to combat any perceived dissent against its position on Chinese issues, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education campaign" since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and organisations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
  • Overseas censorship of Chinese issues refers to censorship outside the People's Republic of China of topics considered sensitive by the ruling Chinese Communist Party. Censored topics include the political status of Taiwan, human rights in Tibet, Xinjiang re-education camps and the Genocide of Uyghurs, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests, the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China and the PRC government's pandemic response, the persecution of Falun Gong, and more general issues related to human rights in China. Censorship is undertaken by foreign companies wishing to do business in China, a growing phenomenon given the country's increasing economic prominence. Companies seeking to avoid offending Chinese customers have engaged in self-censorship and, if accused of offending PRC government sensibilities, have performed "a 21st century kowtow" by posting apologies or making statements in support of government policy. These actions reflect the companies' prioritisation of profit over business ethics, an impulse exploited by the PRC. The PRC government pays 50 Cent Party operatives and encourages "Little Pink" nationalist netizens to combat any perceived dissent against its position on Chinese issues, including opposing any foreign expressions of support for protestors or perceived separatist movements, with the country's "Patriotic Education campaign" since the 1990s emphasising the dangers of foreign influence and the country's century of humiliation by outside powers. Censorship of overseas services is also undertaken by companies based in China, such as WeChat and TikTok. Chinese citizens living abroad as well as family residing in China have also been subject to threats to their employment, education, pension, and business opportunities if they engage in expression critical of the Chinese government or its policies. With limited pushback by foreign governments and organisations, these issues have led to growing concern about self-censorship, compelled speech and a chilling effect on free speech in other countries.
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