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Foreign relations of the Republic of Turkey are the Turkish government's policies in its external relations with the international community. Historically, the Ottoman Empire and later Turkey balanced regional and global powers off against one another, forming alliances that best protected the interests of the incumbent regime. The Soviet Union played a major role in supplying weapons to and financing Mustafa Kemal Atatürk's faction during the Turkish War of Independence but Turkey's relative international isolation during the period of Atatürk's Reforms in 1920s and 1930s was followed by closer relations with Western powers after Turkey became a founding member of the United Nations in 1945, a recipient of Marshall Plan aid and a member of North Atlantic Treaty Organization in 1952. Europ

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  • Foreign relations of the Republic of Turkey are the Turkish government's policies in its external relations with the international community. Historically, the Ottoman Empire and later Turkey balanced regional and global powers off against one another, forming alliances that best protected the interests of the incumbent regime. The Soviet Union played a major role in supplying weapons to and financing Mustafa Kemal Atatürk's faction during the Turkish War of Independence but Turkey's relative international isolation during the period of Atatürk's Reforms in 1920s and 1930s was followed by closer relations with Western powers after Turkey became a founding member of the United Nations in 1945, a recipient of Marshall Plan aid and a member of North Atlantic Treaty Organization in 1952. Europ
  • Foreign relations of the Republic of Turkey are the Turkish government's policies in its external relations with the international community.
  • Foreign relations of the Republic of Turkey are the Turkish government's policies in its external relations with the international community. Turkey's promotion of Armenian Genocide denial has been a major aspect of its foreign relations, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Since the founding of the modern republic, a Western orientation has dominated Turkey’s foreign policy. Throughout the Cold War, Turkey’s most important ally has been the United States, which shared Turkey’s interest in containing Soviet expansion. In support of the United States, Turkey contributed personnel to the UN forces in the Korean War (1950-53), joined NATO in 1952, recognized Israel in 1948 and has cooperated closely with it. Turkey's foreign policy revolves around Armenian Genocide denial, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Since the founding of the modern republic, a Western orientation has dominated Turkey’s foreign policy. Throughout the Cold War, Turkey’s most important ally has been the United States, which shared Turkey’s interest in containing Soviet expansion. In support of the United States, Turkey contributed personnel to the UN forces in the Korean War (1950-53), joined NATO in 1952, recognized Israel in 1948 and has cooperated closely with it. Armenian Genocide denial has been a major aspect of Turkey's foreign policy, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Physically bridging Europe and Asia, Turkey, a Muslim-majority country with two centuries of institutional westernization experience, constitutionally-mandated secular heritage, and its institutional connections to the West, plays a distinctive and productive role in bridging the fault lines between Western and Islamic countries. To this end, Turkey uses its global diplomatic network—the fifth most extensive— of 246 diplomatic and consular missions. Armenian Genocide denial has been a major aspect of Turkey's foreign policy, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Physically bridging Europe and Asia, Turkey, a Muslim-majority country with two centuries of institutional westernization experience, constitutionally-mandated secular heritage, and institutional connections to the West, plays a distinctive and productive role in bridging the fault lines between Western and Islamic countries. To this end, Turkey uses its global diplomatic network—the fifth most extensive—of 246 diplomatic and consular missions. Armenian Genocide denial has been a major aspect of Turkey's foreign policy, dating back to the 1920s.
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  • Foreign relations of Turkey
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  • Foreign relations of the Republic of Turkey are the Turkish government's policies in its external relations with the international community. Historically, the Ottoman Empire and later Turkey balanced regional and global powers off against one another, forming alliances that best protected the interests of the incumbent regime. The Soviet Union played a major role in supplying weapons to and financing Mustafa Kemal Atatürk's faction during the Turkish War of Independence but Turkey's relative international isolation during the period of Atatürk's Reforms in 1920s and 1930s was followed by closer relations with Western powers after Turkey became a founding member of the United Nations in 1945, a recipient of Marshall Plan aid and a member of North Atlantic Treaty Organization in 1952. European Union–Turkey relations warmed during the Cold War period and the post-Cold War period has seen a diversification of relations, with Turkey, at various moments, seeking to strengthen its regional presence in the Balkans, the Middle East and the Caucasus, as well as taking steps toward EU membership. Under the AKP government (2003-), Turkey's economy has grown rapidly and the country's influence has grown in the Middle East based on a strategic depth doctrine, also called Neo-Ottomanism. Debate on Turkey's foreign relations is controversial both within Turkey itself and outside the country. In the West, there is a divide between those who are worried about Turkey's perceived movement away from the West toward a less democratic, more "Islamic" or more pro-Russian and pro-Chinese orientation and those who do not see Turkey's changing political structure, growing regional power and relations with Russia as a threat.
  • Foreign relations of the Republic of Turkey are the Turkish government's policies in its external relations with the international community.
  • Foreign relations of the Republic of Turkey are the Turkish government's policies in its external relations with the international community. Turkey's promotion of Armenian Genocide denial has been a major aspect of its foreign relations, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Since the founding of the modern republic, a Western orientation has dominated Turkey’s foreign policy. Throughout the Cold War, Turkey’s most important ally has been the United States, which shared Turkey’s interest in containing Soviet expansion. In support of the United States, Turkey contributed personnel to the UN forces in the Korean War (1950-53), joined NATO in 1952, recognized Israel in 1948 and has cooperated closely with it. Turkey’s alliance with Israel during the Arab-Israeli conflict strained its relations with the Arab world and subsequently led to overt Syrian support for Palestinian and Armenian terrorist operations against Turkish diplomats abroad until 1990. Turkey's foreign policy revolves around Armenian Genocide denial, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Since the founding of the modern republic, a Western orientation has dominated Turkey’s foreign policy. Throughout the Cold War, Turkey’s most important ally has been the United States, which shared Turkey’s interest in containing Soviet expansion. In support of the United States, Turkey contributed personnel to the UN forces in the Korean War (1950-53), joined NATO in 1952, recognized Israel in 1948 and has cooperated closely with it. Turkey’s alliance with Israel during the Arab-Israeli conflict strained its relations with the Arab world and Iran, and subsequently led to overt Syrian support for Palestinian and Armenian terrorist operations against Turkish diplomats abroad until 1990. Turkey's foreign policy revolves around Armenian Genocide denial, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Since the founding of the modern republic, a Western orientation has dominated Turkey’s foreign policy. Throughout the Cold War, Turkey’s most important ally has been the United States, which shared Turkey’s interest in containing Soviet expansion. In support of the United States, Turkey contributed personnel to the UN forces in the Korean War (1950-53), joined NATO in 1952, recognized Israel in 1948 and has cooperated closely with it. Turkey’s alliance with Israel during the Arab-Israeli conflict strained its relations with the Arab world and Iran, and subsequently led to overt Syrian support for Palestinian and Armenian terrorist operations against Turkish diplomats abroad until 1990. Armenian Genocide denial has been a major aspect of Turkey's foreign policy, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Physically bridging Europe and Asia, Turkey, a Muslim-majority country with two centuries of institutional westernization experience, constitutionally-mandated secular heritage, and its institutional connections to the West, plays a distinctive and productive role in bridging the fault lines between Western and Islamic countries. To this end, Turkey uses its global diplomatic network—the fifth most extensive— of 246 diplomatic and consular missions. Since the founding of the modern republic, a Western orientation has dominated Turkey’s foreign policy. Throughout the Cold War, Turkey’s most important ally has been the United States, which shared Turkey’s interest in containing Soviet expansion. In support of the United States, Turkey contributed personnel to the UN forces in the Korean War (1950-53), joined NATO in 1952, recognized Israel in 1948 and has cooperated closely with it. Turkey’s alliance with Israel during the Arab-Israeli conflict strained its relations with the Arab world and Iran, and subsequently led to overt Syrian support for Palestinian and Armenian terrorist operations against Turkish diplomats abroad until 1990. Armenian Genocide denial has been a major aspect of Turkey's foreign policy, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Physically bridging Europe and Asia, Turkey, a Muslim-majority country with two centuries of institutional westernization experience, constitutionally-mandated secular heritage, and institutional connections to the West, plays a distinctive and productive role in bridging the fault lines between Western and Islamic countries. To this end, Turkey uses its global diplomatic network—the fifth most extensive—of 246 diplomatic and consular missions. Since the founding of the modern republic, a Western orientation has dominated Turkey’s foreign policy. Throughout the Cold War, Turkey’s most important ally has been the United States, which shared Turkey’s interest in containing Soviet expansion. In support of the United States, Turkey contributed personnel to the UN forces in the Korean War (1950-53), joined NATO in 1952, recognized Israel in 1948 and has cooperated closely with it. Turkey’s alliance with Israel during the Arab-Israeli conflict strained its relations with the Arab world and Iran, and subsequently led to overt Syrian support for Palestinian and Armenian terrorist operations against Turkish diplomats abroad until 1990. Armenian Genocide denial has been a major aspect of Turkey's foreign policy, dating back to the 1920s.
  • Physically bridging Europe and Asia, Turkey, a Muslim-majority country with two centuries of institutional westernization experience, constitutionally-mandated secular heritage, and institutional connections to the West, plays a distinctive and productive role in bridging the fault lines between Western and Islamic countries. To this end, Turkey uses its global diplomatic network—the fifth most extensive—of 246 diplomatic and consular missions. Since the founding of the modern republic, a Western orientation has dominated Turkey’s foreign policy. Throughout the Cold War, Turkey’s most important ally has been the United States, which shared Turkey’s interest in containing Soviet expansion. In support of the United States, Turkey contributed personnel to the UN forces in the Korean War (1950–53), joined NATO in 1952, recognized Israel in 1948 and has cooperated closely with it. Turkey’s alliance with Israel during the Arab-Israeli conflict strained its relations with the Arab world and Iran, and subsequently led to overt Syrian support for Palestinian and Armenian terrorist operations against Turkish diplomats abroad until 1990. Armenian Genocide denial has been a major aspect of Turkey's foreign policy, dating back to the 1920s.
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