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The Dönmeh (Turkish: Dönme, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Jewish rabbi and kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually converted to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's conversion, a number of Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society.

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  • The Dönmeh (Turkish: Dönme, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Jewish rabbi and kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually converted to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's conversion, a number of Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's feigned conversion, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Dunamah, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's feigned conversion, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's feigned conversion, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish so
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish s
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-century Turkey as descendants of the Dönmeh.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-century Turkey as descendants of the Dönmeh.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) ARE STILL a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-century Turkey as descendants of the Dönmeh.
  • The donmeh are still an active crypto muslim organisation. The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) ARE STILL a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-ce
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  • Dönmeh
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  • The Dönmeh (Turkish: Dönme, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Jewish rabbi and kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually converted to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's conversion, a number of Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society. The Turkish word dönme is from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means 'to turn', i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or 'turncoat'. They are also called Selânikli "person from Thessaloniki" or avdetî "religious convert" (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎). Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" in Hebrew (Hebrew: המאמינים ha-Ma'aminim), or "sazanikos," Turkish for "carp" in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Turkish: Dönme, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Jewish rabbi and kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually converted to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's conversion, a number of Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society. The Turkish word dönme is from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means 'to turn', i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or 'turncoat'. They are also called Selânikli "person from Thessaloniki" or avdetî "religious convert" (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎). “Dönmeh” not only refers to the Jewish “untrustworthy converts” to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" in Hebrew (Hebrew: המאמינים ha-Ma'aminim), or "sazanikos," Turkish for "carp" in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's feigned conversion, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society. The Turkish word dönme is from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means 'to turn', i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or 'turncoat'. They are also called Selânikli "person from Thessaloniki" or avdetî "religious convert" (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎). “Dönmeh” not only refers to the Jewish “untrustworthy converts” to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" in Hebrew (Hebrew: המאמינים‎ ha-Ma'aminim), or "sazanikos," Turkish for "carp" in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Dunamah, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's feigned conversion, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society. The Turkish word dönme is from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means 'to turn', i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or 'turncoat'. They are also called Selânikli "person from Thessaloniki" or avdetî "religious convert" (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎). “Dönmeh” not only refers to the Jewish “untrustworthy converts” to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), or "sazanikos," Turkish for "carp" in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's feigned conversion, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society. The Turkish word dönme is from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means 'to turn', i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or 'turncoat'. They are also called Selânikli "person from Thessaloniki" or avdetî "religious convert" (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎). “Dönmeh” not only refers to the Jewish “untrustworthy converts” to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), or "sazanikos," Turkish for "carp" in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted publicly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society. The Turkish word Dönme ("Apostates") derives from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means "to turn", i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or "turncoat". They are also called Selânikli "person from Thessaloniki" or avdetî "religious convert" (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎). “Dönmeh” not only refers to the Jewish “untrustworthy converts” to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), or "sazanikos," Turkish for "carp" in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Since the 20th century, assimilated Dönmeh have intermarried with other groups and most have assimilated into Turkish society. The Turkish word Dönme ("Apostates") derives from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means "to turn", i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or "turncoat". They are also called Selânikli ("person from Thessaloniki") or avdetî (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎, "religious convert"). Dönme not only refers to the Jewish “untrustworthy converts” to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), or "sazanikos," Turkish for "carp" in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the Sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-century Turkey as descendants of the Dönmeh. The Turkish word Dönme ("Apostates") derives from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means "to turn", i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or "turncoat". They are also called Selânikli ("person from Thessaloniki") or avdetî (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎, "religious convert"). Dönme not only refers to the Jewish “untrustworthy converts” to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), or sazanikos, Turkish for "carp" in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-century Turkey as descendants of the Dönmeh. The Turkish word Dönme ("Apostates") derives from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means "to turn", i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or "turncoat". They are also called Selânikli ("person from Thessaloniki") or avdetî (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎, "religious convert"). Dönme not only refers to the Jewish “untrustworthy converts” to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), or sazanikos, Turkish for "carp" in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-century Turkey as descendants of the Dönmeh. The Turkish word Dönme ("Apostates") derives from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means "to turn", i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or "turncoat". They are also called Selânikli ("person from Thessaloniki") or avdetî (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎, "religious convert"). Dönme not only refers to the Jewish "untrustworthy converts" to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), or Sazanikos (Turkish for "carps"), in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the zodiacal sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) were a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-century Turkey as descendants of the Dönmeh. The Turkish word Dönme ("Apostates") derives from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means "to turn", i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or "turncoat". They are also called Selânikli ("person from Thessaloniki") or avdetî (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎, "religious convert"). Dönme not only refers to the Jewish "untrustworthy converts" to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), Ḥaberim ("Associates"), or Ba'ale Milḥamah ("Warriors"), while in the town of Adrianople they were known as Sazanikos (Turkish for "little carps"), in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the zodiacal sign of the fish.
  • The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) ARE STILL a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-century Turkey as descendants of the Dönmeh. The Turkish word Dönme ("Apostates") derives from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means "to turn", i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or "turncoat". They are also called Selânikli ("person from Thessaloniki") or avdetî (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎, "religious convert"). Dönme not only refers to the Jewish "untrustworthy converts" to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), Ḥaberim ("Associates"), or Ba'ale Milḥamah ("Warriors"), while in the town of Adrianople they were known as Sazanikos (Turkish for "little carps"), in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the zodiacal sign of the fish.
  • The donmeh are still an active crypto muslim organisation. The Dönmeh (Hebrew: דוֹנְמֶה‎, romanized: Donmeh, Ottoman Turkish: دونمه‎, Turkish: Dönme) ARE STILL a group of Sabbatean crypto-Jews in the Ottoman Empire who converted outwardly to Islam, but retained their Jewish faith and Kabbalistic beliefs in secret. The movement was centered mainly in Thessaloniki. The group originated during and soon after the era of Sabbatai Zevi, a 17th-century Sephardic Jewish Rabbi and Kabbalist who claimed to be the Jewish Messiah and eventually feigned conversion to Islam under threat of death penalty by the sultan Mehmed IV. After Zevi's forced conversion to Islam, a number of Sabbatean Jews also falsely converted to Islam and became the Dönmeh. Part of the Sabbateans lived on until well into 21st-century Turkey as descendants of the Dönmeh. The Turkish word Dönme ("Apostates") derives from the verbal root dön- (Ottoman Turkish: دون‎) that means "to turn", i.e., "to convert", but in a pejorative sense or "turncoat". They are also called Selânikli ("person from Thessaloniki") or avdetî (Ottoman Turkish: عودتی‎, "religious convert"). Dönme not only refers to the Jewish "untrustworthy converts" to Islam in Turkey but it is also a derogatory Turkish word for a transvestite, or someone who is claiming to be someone they are not. Members of the group refer to themselves as "the Believers" (Hebrew: המאמינים‎, romanized: ha-Ma'aminim), Ḥaberim ("Associates"), or Ba'ale Milḥamah ("Warriors"), while in the town of Adrianople they were known as Sazanikos (Turkish for "little carps"), in reference to the changing outward nature of the fish. An alternate explanation of this self-nomenclature is the prophecy that Sabbatai Zevi would deliver the Jews under the zodiacal sign of the fish.
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